5e SRD >Gamemastering >Monsters & Foes >Monsters By Type >Monstrosities >

Roggenwolf

A large wolf with long, white fur and black eyes pads its way into the rows of corn and vanishes. A chorus of dozens of howls echoes from every corner of the field at once.

Medium monstrosity, neutral evil

Armor Class 13
Hit Points 60 (11d8 + 11)
Speed 40 ft.

STR DEX CON INT WIS CHA
14 (+2) 16 (+3) 13 (+1) 5 (–3) 13 (+1) 14 (+2)

Skills Perception +3, Stealth +5
Damage Resistances bludgeoning, piercing, and slashing from nonmagical attacks not made with silver
Senses darkvision 60 ft., passive Perception 13
Languages
Challenge 2 (450 XP)

Special Traits

  • Keen Hearing and Smell. The roggenwolf has advantage on Wisdom (Perception) checks that rely on hearing and smell.

Actions

  • Bite. Melee Weapon Attack: +5 to hit, reach 5 ft., one target. Hit: 7 (1d8 + 3) necrotic damage.
  • Howl (Recharge 5–6). The roggenwolf lets loose a howl that can only be heard inside the minds of nearby creatures. Each creature within 30 feet of the roggenwolf that isn’t an undead or a construct must succeed on a DC 13 Wisdom saving throw or become frightened and restrained for 1 minute. A creature can repeat the saving throw at the end of each of its turns, ending both effects on itself on a success.

About

Smart Prey. The roggenwolf has a taste for the flesh of intelligent beings. It stalks the fields of rural settlements, rendering its prey immobile with its strange howling before dragging the creature away into the fields to feast. It will ignore sheep and goats unless shepherds and servants are unavailable; it lurks near fountains and wells, where people come for water, or along paths between small villages.

False Trails. A roggenwolf possesses just enough intelligence to understand a little of how humanoids think, and it often leaves the bones of its victims arranged in ways that mislead or cast blame on others. It may take a bone into a hunting kennel or place a scrap of cloth in a shepherd’s hut to mislead others.

Extracting Payment for Services. Once seen as minor deities who received sacrifices in exchange for protecting fields and isolated farms, roggenwolves have adapted to take what they were once given. They do still provide the same protection, but this is entirely incidental; they deter other predators to protect their own source of food. Some rituals still call them up to service, harming enemies or chasing off wolves or monsters.

Section 15: Copyright Notice

Creature Codex. © 2018 Open Design LLC; Authors Wolfgang Baur, Dan Dillon, Richard Green, James Haeck, Chris Harris, Jeremy Hochhalter, James Introcaso, Chris Lockey, Shawn Merwin, and Jon Sawatsky.