5e SRD >Creatures >

Giant Dung Beetle, Medium

Medium beast, unaligned

Armor Class 17 (natural armor)
Hit Points 39 (6d8+12)
Speed 30 ft.; fly 20 ft.

STR DEX CON INT WIS CHA
19 (+4) 12 (+1) 15 (+2) 2 (-4) 10 (+0) 7 (-2)

Skills Athletics +6
Senses blindsight 50 feet, passive Perception 10
Languages
Challenge 1 (200 XP)

SPECIAL TRAITS

  • Trampling Charge. If the Giant Dung Beetle moves at least 20 feet straight toward a creature and then hits it with a gore or ram attack on the same turn, that target must succeed on a DC 14 Strength saving throw or be knocked prone. If the target is prone and smaller than itself, the Giant Dung Beetle can make one stomp attack against it as a bonus action.

ACTIONS

  • Gore (Antlers). Melee Weapon Attack: +6 to hit, reach 5 ft., one creature. Hit: 9 (2d4+4) piercing damage.
  • Ram (No Antlers). Melee Weapon Attack: +6 to hit, reach 5 ft., one creature. Hit: 7 (1d6+4) bludgeoning damage.
  • Stomp. Melee Weapon Attack: +6 to hit, reach 5 ft., one prone creature. Hit: 7 (1d6+4) bludgeoning damage.

ABOUT

Vermin of this sort subsist on dung and roll it into spherical balls that they push around, store in tunnels, or simply dwell within. Giant Dung Beetles can fly, albeit relatively slowly and clumsily, when they need to cross obstacles or the like. Their blindsight is based on a keen sense of smell that allows them to find the material that is their namesake.

There is virtually no limit, given enough time and dung, to the size such creatures can grow to, and a Large Giant Dung Beetle is about 10 feet long. Giant Dung Beetles often have large antlers that they can use in combat, but not all such monsters are not so equipped and those that are not simply ram threats to them instead.

The very largest Giant Dung Beetles can also trample man-sized creatures that get in their way. As creatures adapted to eating very soft food, however, dung beetles do not have an effective bite attack.

Giant Dung Beetles have great significance in some religions and their activities are seen as representations of the sun’s daily passage around the world and are widely are depicted throughout the country as scarabs, which represent the ideas of transformation, renewal, and resurrection. Both celestial and fiendish versions of such creatures exist, native to various heavenly and infernal realms, and might be found in or around the temples dedicated to a number of Aigyptian deities, particularly Khepri, god of the rising sun.

Section 15: Copyright Notice
"Aigyptos: A Gazetteer for 5th Edition" copyright 2021, Skirmisher Publishing LLC.