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Samisen of the Seven Spheres

Wondrous item, rare (requires attunement)

This traditional eastern string instrument possesses seven strings rather than the usual three, each tightly pulled across a slab of darkwood. A samisen of the seven spheres can be strummed at will to create up to seven tangible music notes, each about the size of your hand. You can create a single note with a DC 10 Charisma (Performance) check, plus an additional note for every 2 points by which you exceed the DC, up to 7 notes, each of which lasts for up to 7 rounds. If you strum the samisen to create a new set of notes, the previous notes you created disappear.

These notes appear wherever you designate within 30 feet of you, glowing faintly like a candle, and are solid constructs of force. You can use them as hooks to hold things, obstructions to block a door, or anything else you desire. Creatures attempting to move a note or something blocked by it must succeed in an Athletics check with a DC of 10 plus one-half your caster level. If the notes are created in an open area, a square with at least two notes in it is treated as difficult terrain, and a square with at least four notes is impassable unless a creature succeeds on an Athletics or Acrobatics check against a DC of 12 plus one-half your caster level.

A note disappears if a creature succeeds on an Athletics check to push through it. They also can be destroyed by attacks; each has an AC of 10 plus your Charisma modifier and 1 hit point. They provide no cover or concealment.

Once per day, a character proficient with the samisen (treat as a tool proficiency) can use a samisen of the seven spheres to create real objects with the instrument’s power.

This functions as though the character had cast fabricate, substituting a Charisma (Performance) check for any tool proficiency check required to craft a specific type of item.

Section 15: Copyright Notice

The Dragon’s Hoard #3 © 2021, Legendary Games; Lead Designer: Jason Nelson. Authors Matt Kimmel, Michael “solomani” Mifsud, Scott D. Young, Mark Hart, and Jeff Ibach.

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