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Slurrn

Slurrn are a species of tiny parasitic slugs that burrow into hosts and take over their bodies. They can make their host’s voice boom and have its skin glow a specific color.

Traits

Ability Score Increase. A slurrn uses the host’s ability scores.

Age. Slurrn are spawned with an adult intellect. Their hosts do age, and when one host reaches an aged state, the slurrn is likely to choose another.

Alignment. While slurrn might take a willing host, most take the unwilling. Their goals are typically some alignment of evil, regardless of their host’s choice.

Rarity. Rare.

Size. Slurrn are about 6 inches long and weigh only a few ounces. Your size is Tiny. As an active humanoid creature, a slurrn is the size of its host.

Speed. Your speed equals that of your host.

Commanding Presence. You can alter your host’s voice to speak in a booming discordant tone and make your skin glow a color that is specific to you and doesn’t change. You have proficiency in the Intimidation skill when speaking in this way.

Hostless Parasite. While separated from a host, you are a humanoid, but your aberrant nature gives you the following traits.

  • Your size is Tiny.
  • You have Strength 1, Dexterity 7, and Constitution 10.
  • You have 1 hit point per level.
  • You are considered to be an aberration whenever it is detrimental for you.
  • You are immune to disease and poison damage, as well as the poisoned condition, but you are vulnerable to bludgeoning, slashing, and piercing damage.
  • Your base walking speed is 5 feet, you are prone, and you can crawl at full speed.
  • You retain your class abilities, but you cannot perform somatic spell components or other tasks that require a full body.
  • You are incapable of wearing armor and clothing and using gear, tools, and weapons.
  • During a long rest, which you still need outside your host, you remain conscious and aware. To benefit from a long rest you must have been exposed to sunlight for 1 hour in the same 24 hour period.

Subjugate Host. You exist as a parasitic mind of another sapient humanoid, usually a human. Over the course of 1 hour, you can subjugate a nonconstruct, nonelemental humanoid that has O hit points by enveloping its brain, entering through its ear canal.

The body must be whole since you can’t restore severed limbs and such, but any disease or poison in the host clears from the system. Your experience, memories, and soul then override the host’s. You absorb only the host’s most basic mental and spiritual faculties, meaning you take on the host’s racial traits, including ability score adjustments. You can access the host’s memories, which gives you proficiency in the Persuasion skill when attempting a check to deceive another about your true nature. Also, you can add your proficiency bonus to any check where you attempt to perform an action or recall information unique to your host. If you leave your host, which you can do as part of your movement, the host body has O hit points, although you can subjugate it again using this trait. The host would recall your memories and thoughts if they become conscious.

You are also susceptible to certain magic while controlling a body in this way. The break enchantment option of dispel evil and good disrupts your connection to the subjugated body, rendering you stunned for 1 minute if you fail a Wisdom saving throw against the spell. You can repeat the saving throw at the end of each of your turns, ending the stunned condition on you from the spell if you succeed.

Languages. You speak, read, and write Common, as well as the unique Slurrn language and the languages known to your host. In addition to slurrn and sock puppets, there are many sentient parasitic races, such as animate wigs, burrowing blood sprites, cursed masks, living beards, and the exigua, an arthropod that eats its host’s tongue and takes its place. The Wild Lord Apophis has bred a species of sentient cobra that can possess a mortal host.

Section 15: Copyright Notice
Tales of Arcana Race Guide © 2021 Arcanomicon, LLC Author(s) Matt Knicl, Chris S. Sims