5e SRD >Equipment >

Weapons

Weapon Proficiency | Range | Weapon Properties | Special Weapons | Improvised Weapons | Silvered Weapons

Your class grants proficiency in certain weapons, reflecting both the class’s focus and the tools you are most likely to use. Whether you favor a longsword or a longbow, your weapon and your ability to wield it effectively can mean the difference between life and death while adventuring.

The Weapons table shows the most common weapons used in fantasy gaming worlds, their price and weight, the damage they deal when they hit, and any special properties they possess. Every weapon is classified as either melee or ranged. A melee weapon is used to attack a target within 5 feet of you, whereas a ranged weapon is used to attack a target at a distance.

Simple Weapons
(Simple) Melee Weapons Cost Damage Range Weight Properties
Club 1 sp 1d4 bludgeoning 2 lb. light
Dagger 2 gp 1d4 piercing 20/60 1 lb. finesse, light, thrown
Greatclub 2 sp 1d8 bludgeoning 10 lb. two-handed
Handaxe 5 gp 1d6 slashing 20/60 2 lb. light, thrown
Javelin 5 sp 1d6 piercing 30/120 2 lb. thrown
Light hammer 2 gp 1d4 bludgeoning 20/60 2 lb. light, thrown
Mace 5 gp 1d6 bludgeoning 4 lb.
Quarterstaff 2 sp 1d6 bludgeoning 4 lb. versatile (1d8)
Sickle 1 gp 1d4 slashing 2 lb. light
Spear 1 gp 1d6 piercing 20/60 3 lb. thrown, versatile (1d8)
(Simple) Ranged Weapons Cost Damage Range Weight Properties
Crossbow, light 25 gp 1d8 piercing 80/320 5 lb. ammunition, loading, two-handed
Dart 5 cp 1d4 piercing 20/60 1/4 lb. finesse, thrown
Shortbow 25 gp 1d6 piercing 80/320 2 lb. ammunition, two-handed
Sling 1 sp 1d4 bludgeoning 30/120 ammunition

Martial Weapons

(Martial) Melee Weapons Cost Damage Range Weight Properties
Battleaxe 10 gp 1d8 slashing 4 lb. versatile (1d10)
Dwarven Urgrosh (3pp) 22 gp 1d8 piercing or 1d10 slashing 20/60 4 lb. special, two-handed
Elven Crescent Blade (3pp) 80 gp 2d6 slashing 6 lb. heavy, special, two-handed
Flail 10 gp 1d8 bludgeoning 2 lb.
Glaive 20 gp 1d10 slashing 6 lb. heavy, reach, two-handed
Greataxe 30 gp 1d12 slashing 7 lb. heavy, two-handed
Greatsword 50 gp 2d6 slashing 6 lb. heavy, two-handed
Halberd 20 gp 1d10 slashing 6 lb. heavy, reach, two-handed
Lance 10 gp 1d12 piercing 6 lb. reach, special1
Longsword 15 gp 1d8 slashing 3 lb. versatile (1d10)
Maul 10 gp 2d6 bludgeoning 10 lb. heavy, two-handed
Morningstar 15 gp 1d8 piercing 4 lb.
Pike 5 gp 1d10 piercing 18 lb. heavy, reach, two-handed
Rapier 25 gp 1d8 piercing 2 lb. finesse
Scimitar 25 gp 1d6 slashing 3 lb. finesse, light
Shortsword 10 gp 1d6 piercing 2 lb. finesse, light
Spiked Chain (3pp) 50 gp 1d8 piercing 10 lb. finesse, heavy, reach, special, two-handed
Trident 5 gp 1d6 piercing 20/60 4 lb. thrown, versatile (1d8)
War pick 5 gp 1d8 piercing 2 lb.
Warhammer 15 gp 1d8 bludgeoning 2 lb. versatile (1d10)
Whip 2 gp 1d4 slashing 3 lb. finesse, reach
War Scythe (3pp) 25 gp 1d10 slashing 4 lb. special, two-handed
(Martial) Ranged Weapons Cost Damage Range Weight Properties
Blowgun 10 gp 1 piercing 25/100 1 lb. ammunition, loading
Crossbow, hand 75 gp 1d6 piercing 30/120 3 lb. ammunition, light, loading
Crossbow, heavy 50 gp 1d10 piercing 100/400 18 lb. ammunition, heavy, loading, two-handed
Great Bow (3pp) 100 gp 1d8 piercing 150/600 2 lb. ammunition, heavy, two-handed, special
Longbow 50 gp 1d8 piercing 150/600 2 lb. ammunition, heavy, two-handed
Net 1 gp 5/15 3 lb. thrown, special2

Weapon Proficiency

Your race, class, and feats can grant you proficiency with certain weapons or categories of weapons. The two categories are simple and martial. Most people can use simple weapons with proficiency. These weapons include clubs, maces, and other weapons often found in the hands of commoners. Martial weapons, including swords, axes, and polearms, require more specialized training to use effectively. Most warriors use martial weapons because these weapons put their fighting style and training to best use.

Proficiency with a weapon allows you to add your proficiency bonus to the attack roll for any attack you make with that weapon. If you make an attack roll using a weapon with which you lack proficiency, you do not add your proficiency bonus to the attack roll.

Range

A weapon that can be used to make a ranged attack has a range as well as the ammunition or thrown property. The range lists two numbers. The first is the weapon’s normal range in feet, and the second indicates the weapon’s long range. When attacking a target beyond normal range, you have disadvantage on the attack roll. You can’t attack a target beyond the weapon’s long range.

Weapon Properties

Many weapons have special properties related to their use, as shown in the Weapons table.

Ammunition: You can use a weapon that has the ammunition property to make a ranged attack only if you have ammunition to fire from the weapon. Each time you attack with the weapon, you expend one piece of ammunition. Drawing the ammunition from a quiver, case, or other container is part of the attack (you need a free hand to load a one-handed weapon). At the end of the battle, you can recover half your expended ammunition by taking a minute to search the battlefield. If you use a weapon that has the ammunition property to make a melee attack, you treat the weapon as an improvised weapon (see “Improvised Weapons” later in the section). A sling must be loaded to deal any damage when used in this way.

Close. A close weapon is more effective up close than other ranged weapons. When you make a ranged attack with a close weapon, you do not suffer disadvantage on the attack roll when you are within 5 feet of a hostile creature who can see you and who is not incapacitated. Source TLCR

Deadly. When you roll a natural 1 on a damage die with a deadly weapon, treat the result as a 2 instead. Source TLCR

Defensive. A defensive weapon makes you harder to hit effectively while you are wielding two weapons. As long as at least one of your two weapons has the defensive property, you add +1 to your AC against the first attack that targets you in a round, provided you aren’t surprised or immobile. You regain the bonus at the start of your next turn, and do not gain this bonus against subsequent attacks against you until then. Source TLCR

Finesse: When making an attack with a finesse weapon, you use your choice of your Strength or Dexterity modifier for the attack and damage rolls. You must use the same modifier for both rolls.

Heavy: Small creatures have disadvantage on attack rolls with heavy weapons. A heavy weapon’s size and bulk make it too large for a Small creature to use effectively.

Light: A light weapon is small and easy to handle, making it ideal for use when fighting with two weapons.

Loading: Because of the time required to load this weapon, you can fire only one piece of ammunition from it when you use an action, bonus action, or reaction to fire it, regardless of the number of attacks you can normally make.

Reach: This weapon adds 5 feet to your reach when you attack with it, as well as when determining your reach for opportunity attacks with it.

Special: A weapon with the special property has unusual rules governing its use, explained in the weapon’s description (see “Special Weapons” later in this section).

Thrown: If a weapon has the thrown property, you can throw the weapon to make a ranged attack. If the weapon is a melee weapon, you use the same ability modifier for that attack roll and damage roll that you would use for a melee attack with the weapon. For example, if you throw a handaxe, you use your Strength, but if you throw a dagger, you can use either your Strength or your Dexterity, since the dagger has the finesse property.

Two-Handed: This weapon requires two hands when you attack with it.

Versatile: This weapon can be used with one or two hands. A damage value in parentheses appears with the property—the damage when the weapon is used with two hands to make a melee attack.

Special Weapons

Weapons with special rules are described here.

Dwarven Urgrosh: (Player’s Advantage – Barbarian) One head of this weapon ends in a spear and the other end is an axe. Originally used exclusively for mining, these weapons were adapted to combat creatures in the Underdark. If you have the Dual Wielder feat, the Exotic Weapon Master feat, or the Two-Weapon Fighting style, you can wield a dwarven urgrosh as a one-handed spear and a one-handed battleaxe. It gains the light property when wielded in this way.

Elven Crescent Blade: (Player’s Advantage – Barbarian) This long, almost moon-shaped blade allows a proper wielder unsurpassed flexibility in battle. If you have the Exotic Weapon Master feat, the elven crescent blade gains the finesse property.

Great Bow: (Player’s Advantage – Barbarian) This 6-foot tall bow is made of elm rather than yew or ash, making it astonishingly stiff, large and strong, and equally capable of use for long and short shooting. You can use a bonus action to steady yourself. While you are steadied, your attacks with the great bow deal 2d6 piercing damage. You are no longer steadied if you move.

Lance: You have disadvantage when you use a lance to attack a target within 5 feet of you. Also, a lance requires two hands to wield when you aren’t mounted.

Net: A Large or smaller creature hit by a net is restrained until it is freed. A net has no effect on creatures that are formless, or creatures that are Huge or larger. A creature can use its action to make a DC 10 Strength check, freeing itself or another creature within its reach on a success. Dealing 5 slashing damage to the net (AC 10) also frees the creature without harming it, ending the effect and destroying the net. When you use an action, bonus action, or reaction to attack with a net, you can make only one attack regardless of the number of attacks you can normally make.

Spiked Chain: (Player’s Advantage – Barbarian) A length of spiked chain is between 6 and 8-feet long with wicked barbs welded onto one end. If you have the Dual-Wielder feat, the Exotic Weapon Master feat, or the Two-Weapon Fighting style, you can wield a spiked chain as two one-handed, light weapons that each deal 1d6 piercing damage. The spiked chain loses the reach property when wielded in this way.

War Scythe: (Player’s Advantage – Barbarian) Fashioned to resemble the threshing implement but modified for battle, the war scythe can be a deadly weapon in the right hands. You can’t wield a war scythe in one hand. If you have the Exotic Weapon Master feat, you can wield the war scythe as a war pick. It gains the versatile (d10) property when wielded in this way. When you take the Attack action, you can attempt the Trip Attack combat manuever (DC 8 + your proficiency bonus + your Strength modifier) against a creature as one of your attacks.

Improvised Weapons

Sometimes characters don’t have their weapons and have to attack with whatever is at hand. An improvised weapon includes any object you can wield in one or two hands, such as broken glass, a table leg, a frying pan, a wagon wheel, or a dead goblin.

Often, an improvised weapon is similar to an actual weapon and can be treated as such. For example, a table leg is akin to a club. At the GM’s option, a character proficient with a weapon can use a similar object as if it were that weapon and use his or her proficiency bonus.

An object that bears no resemblance to a weapon deals 1d4 damage (the GM assigns a damage type appropriate to the object). If a character uses a ranged weapon to make a melee attack, or throws a melee weapon that does not have the thrown property, it also deals 1d4 damage. An improvised thrown weapon has a normal range of 20 feet and a long range of 60 feet.

Special Materials

Some items can be crafted from odd or rare materials, including silver, gold, adamantine, etc. Listed below are some sample materials. The only “official” material described in the SRD is silver. The other materials are from other publishers. Use at your GM’s discretion.

Identifying Special Materials

With a successful Arcana check, a character can attempt to identify and understand strange substances such as the ones listed here:

Material DC
Aethel 22
Black adamantine 25
Firestone 15
Heliothil 19
Ithildin 18
Ithilnaur 18
Liquid light 23
Liquid shadow 24
Marlite 24
Moonsilver 20
Vallis 22

Aethel

Source Pt-MCCbtS

One of the rarest and most valuable substances isn’t a drug or a weapon, but a mineral. While the greenish stone of the absent moon is a natural power source on its own, the clear crystals of aethel absorb magical energy and even light.

Aethel can absorb one to ten spell levels (depending on the size of the crystal). Once the crystal has absorbed this many spell levels of energy, it can’t ever absorb more.

Spellcasters can use the energy stored within aethel to power their own spells, as though the crystal were a rod of absorption. The aethel stone does not require attunement. A crystal that can no longer absorb energy and has no energy remaining becomes inert forever.

If a character tries to absorb more spell levels than a piece of aethel can hold, the stone bursts in a 10-foot radius, inflicting 10 (3d6) piercing damage plus 3 (1d6) piercing damage for each spell level stored within the crystal (characters in the area can attempt a DC 18 Dexterity save for half damage).

The value of aethel stone is equal to the number of potential spell levels absorbed squared × 1,000 gp.

A character who makes a DC 25 Arcana check can figure out a way to use an aethel crystal full of absorbed energy as a crafting component for a magic item. The exact use of the stone is up to the Gm, but is generally the equivalent of a spell scroll of a spell whose level is equal to the stone’s stored spell levels.

Antler or Horn

Source VKCS

Mostly suited for piercing weapons, with care and time an antler or horn can be hewn and worked into a fearsome edge.

  • Creatures with the Evil primal element take a –2 penalty on attack rolls using antler or horn weapons.

Black Adamantine

Source Pt-MCCbtS

Black adamantine is one of the hardest substances in existence, and it has additional antimagical qualities. It is immensely expensive, usually about 1,000 gp per ounce.

Black adamantine has resistance to all damage, and advantage on saves against magic.

A DC 25 Arcana check reveals that a wish spell can make black adamantine completely impervious to physical force or spells. Black adamantine armor is equivalent to adamantine armor, but the wearer also gains the metal’s advantage on saves against magic.

Bone

Source VKCS

Grisly as it may be, bone is a strong material frequently hewn into weaponry. Usually it’s meant to pierce or slash, but the femur of a massive creature can easily become a greatclub or even perfected into a maul.

  • A bone weapon functions as magical when striking a creature with immunity or resistance to nonmagical weapons.
  • When an attacker rolls a natural 1 on an attack roll using a bone weapon, it rolls an attack roll against AC 10. On a failure, the bone weapon becomes broken.
  • Creatures with the Good primal element take a –2 penalty on attack rolls using bone weapons.
  • Bone weapons cost 50% more than their listed price in the core Fifth Edition rules.

Bronze

Source VKCS

Copper and tin can be mined then melted down, mixed together into a malleable material, and cast into blades and shapes of all sorts.

  • When a bronze weapon or shield takes 20 or more fire damage (30 or more if it has the Heavy property) in one round it becomes broken.

Firestone

Source Pt-MCCbtS

The mineral known as firestone can be created only through magic. It burns with great efficiency, which causes technologists to desire it greatly to fuel their devices. A small stone weighs 1 pound and can burn hotly for twenty-four hours.

Heliothil

Source Pt-MCCbtS

Heliothil is a pale violet stone that has negative weight. A stone that should weigh about 1 pound has in fact 5 pounds of negative weight.

This means that, if a piece of pure heliothil were unsecured, it would fall upward at a great rate and disappear into the sky. It also means that securing 5 pounds of normal material to a 1-pound chunk of heliothil renders the normal material effectively weightless. The heliothil and attached material float in midair.

When dwarven miners discovered heliothil, much of it initially was lost—once mined and freed from surrounding minerals, the loosed heliothil floated up into space.

Eventually, the dwarves developed safe mining and transporting practices, and engineers began using heliothil to create floating castles, flying ships, hovering (virtually) weightless chariots, and so on.

Heliothil is not magical, at least not in the technical sense of the word. It retains its negative weight even in antimagic areas.

Heliothil is worth 100 gp per negative pound.

Iron

Source VKCS

This metal’s ore is common enough, but melting the useful parts out requires tremendous heat and sophisticated equipment far beyond the ken of most mortals. Those who do know the process and are capable of forging iron weapons are wont to share the knowledge.

  • Iron weapons count as magical for the purpose of overcoming resistance and immunity to nonmagical attacks and damage.
  • Iron weapons cost 25% more than their listed price in the core Fifth Edition rules.
  • Iron rusts when not protected from air and water. For every week that an iron weapon or shield is not treated with oil over the course of a short rest, or for every day it is exposed to the open air or in water, it gains one level of rusting. For each level of rusting a weapon has, it takes a permanent and cumulative ?1 penalty to damage rolls. If its penalty drops to ?5, the weapon is destroyed. An iron shield reduces its bonus to armor class by 1 for every two levels of rusting it has, and is destroyed when it has 5 levels of rusting.

Ithildin And Ithilnaur

Source Pt-MCCbtS

The elves know of many special minerals, materials, and herbs. In particular, they are known for two metals: ithildin (a decorative silver that glows at night but is dull and almost invisible during the day) and ithilnaur (a thin, strong material with the same properties as ithildin). Both metals’ glow is equal to that of candlelight.

Ithildin is like silver but costs twice as much.

Ithilnaur is like silver, but harder and lighter than steel of the same thickness, and costs five times as much.

Liquid Light

In the earliest days of creation, when air, earth, fire, and water had not yet reached their final states, sunlight shone into pockets of air that eventually became trapped deep underground.

This air turned naturally into liquid light as a result of tremendous good done in the world; the residue seeps up from the depths of the earth and takes on a physical substance. Thus, deep in the earth one can encounter pools of bright sunlight, preserved forever as a thick, milky liquid. One pint of this fluid shines as if full daylight in just over a 100-foot radius without ever losing its brightness.

Liquid light is worth 1,000 gp per pint and is usually found only in amounts of six to ten pints at a time.

One can use liquid light to enhance spells that create or amplify light and goodness; any spell cast with liquid light added as an optional material component counts as a spell of light and good. A pint of the material used as a spell component modifies a spell so that its effective spell slot level is 2 higher than normal (maximum 9th level), and increases the spell save DC by +2.

Liquid light can be used like holy water against fiends, undead, and evil-aligned creatures native to other planes. Each pint inflicts 10 (3d6) radiant damage, or 70 (20d6) radiant damage per round for full immersion.

Liquid Shadow

Source Pt-MCCbtS

Liquid shadow is a vile substance that pools in the darkest corners of the world—usually at the heartrock of a massive mountain or in a cave at the bottom of the deepest lake. It exists naturally as a result of evil done in the world; the residue seeps into the earth and takes on a physical substance in the deep darkness.

Liquid shadow is worth 1,000 gp per pint and is usually found in amounts of only one or two pints at a time.

One can use liquid shadow to enhance spells that create or amplify darkness, evil, or shadow; any spell cast with liquid shadow added as an optional material component counts as a spell of darkness, evil, and shadow. A pint of the material used as a spell component modifies a spell so that its effective spell slot level is 2 higher than normal (maximum 9th level), and increases the spell save DC by +2.

Like splashing undead with holy water, liquid shadow can be used to harm blessed children, celestials, and good-aligned creatures native to other planes. Each pint inflicts 10 (3d6) necrotic damage, or 70 (20d6) necrotic damage per round for full immersion. If used against fiends or undead, it heals them instead of harms them.

Marlite

Source Pt-MCCbtS

Marlite shines like blue-tinted iron and can be processed into a metal as hard and resilient as steel. It is far more valuable than steel, however, due to its secondary property: marlite is a magic-dead material. It has no natural magic within it, and it cannot be affected by spells, magic items, or magical abilities. In effect, it is completely immune to magic. A sword made of marlite couldn’t be affected by a spell designed to make it too hot to hold or turn to dust. No one could magically yank such a sword from the wielder’s hand with magical telekinesis.

This means, of course, that magic can’t affect it in beneficial ways, either—the sword couldn’t be made magically sharper or more likely to hit.

Armor made of marlite gives the wearer no special properties. Spells can still affect the wearer, just not the armor directly.

An item made with marlite instead of iron or steel costs ten times the normal price.

Moonsilver

Source Pt-MCCbtS

Called “ithilirid” by the elves, this metal is always found in liquid form, looking similar to mercury. One can use it to coat a solid surface, to which it then adheres, protecting the surface as if it were made of iron. The surface retains all normal flexibility. Thus, one could apply it to a person to grant them the benefits of wearing plate with none of the drawbacks that heavier armor usually exacts. The effects of moonsilver are as fleeting as the moon’s reign in the night sky, however—the substance fades away approximately four hours after it adheres to a surface.

Moonsilver will not adhere to ithildin or ithilnaur, so sealed containers made of these materials can be used to store the liquid.

Moonsilver forms in droplets among the dew of heavily forested areas on nights of the full moon. If no one collects it, the trees, grass, and other plants in such regions sometimes have silvery drops clinging to them after daybreak, as hard as metal. However, they fade by mid-morning.

Moonsilver prices depend on the amount of the substance. Enough for a full suit of armor costs about 600 gp. Partial doses fail to work, and multiple doses do not add up.

Obsidian

Source VKCS

When expertly flaked, the edge of this rock becomes lethally sharp, and though it only sometimes matters those fell kaviyans who engage in blood rituals prefer to do so with an obsidian blade.

  • When an obsidian weapon is used to score a critical hit, the wielder can choose for a part of it to break off into the target. If the target is a living creature it takes 1d4 damage at the start of its turn every round until the wound is stanched with a successful Wisdom (Medicine) check (DC equal to damage from the critical hit) or the target receives magical healing. The obsidian weapon takes a permanent and cumulative ?1 penalty to damage rolls. If its penalty drops to ?5, the weapon is destroyed.
  • When an attacker rolls a natural 1 on an attack roll using an obsidian weapon, it rolls an attack roll against AC 14. On a failure, the obsidian weapon becomes broken.
  • Creatures with the Air primal element take a –2 penalty on attack rolls using obsidian weapons.
  • Obsidian weapons cost 25% less than their listed price in the core Fifth Edition rules.

Silver

Some monsters that have immunity or resistance to nonmagical weapons are susceptible to silver weapons, so cautious adventurers invest extra coin to plate their weapons with silver. You can silver a single weapon or ten pieces of ammunition for 100 gp. This cost represents not only the price of the silver, but the time and expertise needed to add silver to the weapon without making it less effective.

Stone

Source VKCS

The vast majority of stone weapons are made of knapped flint or chert.

  • When an attacker rolls a natural 1 on an attack roll using a stone weapon, it rolls an attack roll against AC 12. On a failure, the stone weapon becomes broken.
  • Stone weapons cost 50% less than their listed price in the core Fifth Edition rules.

Vallis

Source Pt-MCCbtS

Vallis stones are raw magical power in solid form and can be used to fuel spells, magic items, and mighty rituals.

Vallis dust can be used to create spell slots just like using the stored energy of a rod of absorption. The larger the speck of dust, the more spell levels it can create; most specks range from one to six spell levels in capacity. As the piece of Vallis is used, it diminishes. So if a bit of Vallis dust with the capacity for four spell levels is used to create a 2nd-level spell slot, it grows noticeably smaller, but still has two spell levels left and can be used to create another 2nd-level spell slot or two 1st-level spell slots. Exhausted Vallis disappears entirely.

For proper use, one must prepare the dust in a magical ritual that takes twenty-four hours. Unprepared Vallis can power spells, but at a less efficient rate. A piece of unprepared Vallis weighing 1 ounce holds power for one spell level, while a prepared Vallis stone that same size could power twenty spell levels.

Should one find a significantly large piece of unprepared Vallis, using it would pose a real danger. Once tapped, the stone literally leaks power. Further, the Vallis loses one potential spell level of power per day as the stone’s capacity leaks away. Anyone touching a leaking Vallis stone must make a DC 15 Constitution saving throw each round or gain one level of exhaustion.

Someone who succeeds at a DC 25 Arcana check can figure out how to use a Vallis stone as a crafting component for a magic item. The exact use of the stone is up to the Gm, but is generally the equivalent of a spell scroll of a spell whose level is equal to the stone’s stored spell levels.

The value of Vallis stone or dust is equal to its number of spell levels squared × 50. Thus, a piece of Vallis that could power one spell level costs 50 gp; one that could power two spell levels costs 200 gp; three spell levels is 450 gp; and so on.

Everything Breaks

Source VKCS

Eventually Using a broken piece of equipment isn’t ideal, but when wielding primitive weaponry and shields it’s often the case during combat that a warrior must make do with what’s at hand.

A broken weapon or shield can be repaired with a DC 12 Dexterity or Wisdom check over the course of a long rest. This check can be attempted during a short rest by making it with disadvantage, but rushing endangers the repair and on a failure all the materials become useless.

Broken Weapon. When you hit with a weapon attack using a broken weapon, you deal half damage.

Broken Shield. While wielding a broken shield, you only gain a +1 bonus to your armor class.