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Weapons

Contents

Weapon Proficiency | Range | Weapon Properties | Special Weapons | Improvised Weapons | Silvered Weapons

Your class grants proficiency in certain weapons, reflecting both the class’s focus and the tools you are most likely to use. Whether you favor a longsword or a longbow, your weapon and your ability to wield it effectively can mean the difference between life and death while adventuring.

The Weapons table shows the most common weapons used in fantasy gaming worlds, their price and weight, the damage they deal when they hit, and any special properties they possess. Every weapon is classified as either melee or ranged. A melee weapon is used to attack a target within 5 feet of you, whereas a ranged weapon is used to attack a target at a distance.

Simple Weapons
(Simple) Melee Weapons Cost Damage Range Weight Properties
Club 1 sp 1d4 bludgeoning 2 lb. light
Dagger 2 gp 1d4 piercing 20/60 1 lb. finesse, light, thrown
Greatclub 2 sp 1d8 bludgeoning 10 lb. two-handed
Handaxe 5 gp 1d6 slashing 20/60 2 lb. light, thrown
Javelin 5 sp 1d6 piercing 30/120 2 lb. thrown
Light hammer 2 gp 1d4 bludgeoning 20/60 2 lb. light, thrown
Mace 5 gp 1d6 bludgeoning 4 lb.
Quarterstaff 2 sp 1d6 bludgeoning 4 lb. versatile (1d8)
Sickle 1 gp 1d4 slashing 2 lb. light
Spear 1 gp 1d6 piercing 20/60 3 lb. thrown, versatile (1d8)
(Simple) Ranged Weapons Cost Damage Range Weight Properties
Crossbow, light 25 gp 1d8 piercing 80/320 5 lb. ammunition, loading, two-handed
Dart 5 cp 1d4 piercing 20/60 1/4 lb. finesse, thrown
Shortbow 25 gp 1d6 piercing 80/320 2 lb. ammunition, two-handed
Sling 1 sp 1d4 bludgeoning 30/120 ammunition

Martial Weapons

(Martial) Melee Weapons Cost Damage Range Weight Properties
Battleaxe 10 gp 1d8 slashing 4 lb. versatile (1d10)
Dwarven Urgrosh (3pp) 22 gp 1d8 piercing or 1d10 slashing 20/60 4 lb. special, two-handed
Elven Crescent Blade (3pp) 80 gp 2d6 slashing 6 lb. heavy, special, two-handed
Flail 10 gp 1d8 bludgeoning 2 lb.
Glaive 20 gp 1d10 slashing 6 lb. heavy, reach, two-handed
Greataxe 30 gp 1d12 slashing 7 lb. heavy, two-handed
Greatsword 50 gp 2d6 slashing 6 lb. heavy, two-handed
Halberd 20 gp 1d10 slashing 6 lb. heavy, reach, two-handed
Lance 10 gp 1d12 piercing 6 lb. reach, special1
Longsword 15 gp 1d8 slashing 3 lb. versatile (1d10)
Maul 10 gp 2d6 bludgeoning 10 lb. heavy, two-handed
Morningstar 15 gp 1d8 piercing 4 lb.
Pike 5 gp 1d10 piercing 18 lb. heavy, reach, two-handed
Rapier 25 gp 1d8 piercing 2 lb. finesse
Scimitar 25 gp 1d6 slashing 3 lb. finesse, light
Shortsword 10 gp 1d6 piercing 2 lb. finesse, light
Spiked Chain (3pp) 50 gp 1d8 piercing 10 lb. finesse, heavy, reach, special, two-handed
Trident 5 gp 1d6 piercing 20/60 4 lb. thrown, versatile (1d8)
War pick 5 gp 1d8 piercing 2 lb.
Warhammer 15 gp 1d8 bludgeoning 2 lb. versatile (1d10)
Whip 2 gp 1d4 slashing 3 lb. finesse, reach
War Scythe (3pp) 25 gp 1d10 slashing 4 lb. special, two-handed
(Martial) Ranged Weapons Cost Damage Range Weight Properties
Blowgun 10 gp 1 piercing 25/100 1 lb. ammunition, loading
Crossbow, hand 75 gp 1d6 piercing 30/120 3 lb. ammunition, light, loading
Crossbow, heavy 50 gp 1d10 piercing 100/400 18 lb. ammunition, heavy, loading, two-handed
Great Bow (3pp) 100 gp 1d8 piercing 150/600 2 lb. ammunition, heavy, two-handed, special
Longbow 50 gp 1d8 piercing 150/600 2 lb. ammunition, heavy, two-handed
Net 1 gp 5/15 3 lb. thrown, special2

Weapon Proficiency

Your race, class, and feats can grant you proficiency with certain weapons or categories of weapons. The two categories are simple and martial. Most people can use simple weapons with proficiency. These weapons include clubs, maces, and other weapons often found in the hands of commoners. Martial weapons, including swords, axes, and polearms, require more specialized training to use effectively. Most warriors use martial weapons because these weapons put their fighting style and training to best use.

Proficiency with a weapon allows you to add your proficiency bonus to the attack roll for any attack you make with that weapon. If you make an attack roll using a weapon with which you lack proficiency, you do not add your proficiency bonus to the attack roll.

Range

A weapon that can be used to make a ranged attack has a range as well as the ammunition or thrown property. The range lists two numbers. The first is the weapon’s normal range in feet, and the second indicates the weapon’s long range. When attacking a target beyond normal range, you have disadvantage on the attack roll. You can’t attack a target beyond the weapon’s long range.

Weapon Properties

Many weapons have special properties related to their use, as shown in the Weapons table.

Ammunition: You can use a weapon that has the ammunition property to make a ranged attack only if you have ammunition to fire from the weapon. Each time you attack with the weapon, you expend one piece of ammunition. Drawing the ammunition from a quiver, case, or other container is part of the attack (you need a free hand to load a one-handed weapon). At the end of the battle, you can recover half your expended ammunition by taking a minute to search the battlefield. If you use a weapon that has the ammunition property to make a melee attack, you treat the weapon as an improvised weapon (see “Improvised Weapons” later in the section). A sling must be loaded to deal any damage when used in this way.

Close. A close weapon is more effective up close than other ranged weapons. When you make a ranged attack with a close weapon, you do not suffer disadvantage on the attack roll when you are within 5 feet of a hostile creature who can see you and who is not incapacitated. Source TLCR

Deadly. When you roll a natural 1 on a damage die with a deadly weapon, treat the result as a 2 instead. Source TLCR

Defensive. A defensive weapon makes you harder to hit effectively while you are wielding two weapons. As long as at least one of your two weapons has the defensive property, you add +1 to your AC against the first attack that targets you in a round, provided you aren’t surprised or immobile. You regain the bonus at the start of your next turn, and do not gain this bonus against subsequent attacks against you until then. Source TLCR

Finesse: When making an attack with a finesse weapon, you use your choice of your Strength or Dexterity modifier for the attack and damage rolls. You must use the same modifier for both rolls.

Heavy: Small creatures have disadvantage on attack rolls with heavy weapons. A heavy weapon’s size and bulk make it too large for a Small creature to use effectively.

Light: A light weapon is small and easy to handle, making it ideal for use when fighting with two weapons.

Loading: Because of the time required to load this weapon, you can fire only one piece of ammunition from it when you use an action, bonus action, or reaction to fire it, regardless of the number of attacks you can normally make.

Reach: This weapon adds 5 feet to your reach when you attack with it, as well as when determining your reach for opportunity attacks with it.

Special: A weapon with the special property has unusual rules governing its use, explained in the weapon’s description (see “Special Weapons” later in this section).

Thrown: If a weapon has the thrown property, you can throw the weapon to make a ranged attack. If the weapon is a melee weapon, you use the same ability modifier for that attack roll and damage roll that you would use for a melee attack with the weapon. For example, if you throw a handaxe, you use your Strength, but if you throw a dagger, you can use either your Strength or your Dexterity, since the dagger has the finesse property.

Two-Handed: This weapon requires two hands when you attack with it.

Versatile: This weapon can be used with one or two hands. A damage value in parentheses appears with the property—the damage when the weapon is used with two hands to make a melee attack.

Special Weapons

Weapons with special rules are described here.

Dwarven Urgrosh: (Player’s Advantage – Barbarian) One head of this weapon ends in a spear and the other end is an axe. Originally used exclusively for mining, these weapons were adapted to combat creatures in the Underdark. If you have the Dual Wielder feat, the Exotic Weapon Master feat, or the Two-Weapon Fighting style, you can wield a dwarven urgrosh as a one-handed spear and a one-handed battleaxe. It gains the light property when wielded in this way.

Elven Crescent Blade: (Player’s Advantage – Barbarian) This long, almost moon-shaped blade allows a proper wielder unsurpassed flexibility in battle. If you have the Exotic Weapon Master feat, the elven crescent blade gains the finesse property.

Great Bow: (Player’s Advantage – Barbarian) This 6-foot tall bow is made of elm rather than yew or ash, making it astonishingly stiff, large and strong, and equally capable of use for long and short shooting. You can use a bonus action to steady yourself. While you are steadied, your attacks with the great bow deal 2d6 piercing damage. You are no longer steadied if you move.

Lance: You have disadvantage when you use a lance to attack a target within 5 feet of you. Also, a lance requires two hands to wield when you aren’t mounted.

Net: A Large or smaller creature hit by a net is restrained until it is freed. A net has no effect on creatures that are formless, or creatures that are Huge or larger. A creature can use its action to make a DC 10 Strength check, freeing itself or another creature within its reach on a success. Dealing 5 slashing damage to the net (AC 10) also frees the creature without harming it, ending the effect and destroying the net. When you use an action, bonus action, or reaction to attack with a net, you can make only one attack regardless of the number of attacks you can normally make.

Spiked Chain: (Player’s Advantage – Barbarian) A length of spiked chain is between 6 and 8-feet long with wicked barbs welded onto one end. If you have the Dual-Wielder feat, the Exotic Weapon Master feat, or the Two-Weapon Fighting style, you can wield a spiked chain as two one-handed, light weapons that each deal 1d6 piercing damage. The spiked chain loses the reach property when wielded in this way.

War Scythe: (Player’s Advantage – Barbarian) Fashioned to resemble the threshing implement but modified for battle, the war scythe can be a deadly weapon in the right hands. You can’t wield a war scythe in one hand. If you have the Exotic Weapon Master feat, you can wield the war scythe as a war pick. It gains the versatile (d10) property when wielded in this way. When you take the Attack action, you can attempt the Trip Attack combat manuever (DC 8 + your proficiency bonus + your Strength modifier) against a creature as one of your attacks.

Improvised Weapons

Sometimes characters don’t have their weapons and have to attack with whatever is at hand. An improvised weapon includes any object you can wield in one or two hands, such as broken glass, a table leg, a frying pan, a wagon wheel, or a dead goblin.

Often, an improvised weapon is similar to an actual weapon and can be treated as such. For example, a table leg is akin to a club. At the GM’s option, a character proficient with a weapon can use a similar object as if it were that weapon and use his or her proficiency bonus.

An object that bears no resemblance to a weapon deals 1d4 damage (the GM assigns a damage type appropriate to the object). If a character uses a ranged weapon to make a melee attack, or throws a melee weapon that does not have the thrown property, it also deals 1d4 damage. An improvised thrown weapon has a normal range of 20 feet and a long range of 60 feet.

Beyond Damage Dice

Source Beyond Damage Dice \ Open Design

A weapon is more than the damage it deals. In combat, skilled warriors use their weapons to confuse, disorient, and disadvantage their enemies before moving in for the kill. Beyond Damage Dice offers unique maneuvers for specific weapons from both the core Fifth Edition rules and the Midgard Campaign Setting, giving them a distinct impact on the battlefield. Unless specified otherwise, any of the maneuvers in this document can be used by any character as long as they are wielding the appropriate weapon and are proficient with it. If a maneuver requires a creature to make a saving throw, the DC equals 8 + the attacker’s proficiency bonus + the attacker’s Strength or Dexterity modifier (attacker’s choice). Unless specified, these maneuvers have only their listed effect and don’t deal normal weapon damage.

Statistics for seven new weapons presented here can be found on the table at the end of this document.

Swords

Dikama (Fang Blade)

The wicked dikama fang blade is shaped like a serrated, oversized lion’s tooth.

  • Bloody Wound. When you hit a living creature with a dikama, you can choose to make a superficial but bloody wound. The attack deals no damage, but the target takes 1d6 slashing damage at the beginning of each of its turns until it or another creature makes a DC 10 Wisdom (Medicine) check as an action to stop the bleeding or until it receives magical healing.
  • Serrated Twist. When you deal damage to a living creature with a dikama (not including damage from the Bloody Wound maneuver), you may twist the serrated blade as a bonus action. The creature must make a Constitution saving throw or take 2d4 slashing damage.
Greatsword
  • Arcing Slash. When you attack with a greatsword, you may choose to target two creatures within your reach with a single attack. This attack uses the same attack roll for both targets and deals slashing damage equal to 1d6 plus your Strength modifier to each target.
  • Grinding Halt. Whenever you must make a Strength saving throw to avoid being moved against your will, you can dig the blade of your greatsword into the ground as a reaction. Roll 2d6 and add the number rolled to the saving throw. If the effect pushing you does not have a saving throw, you move 5 feet fewer.
Longsword
  • Lock Blades. When a creature attacks you with a weapon, you may use your reaction to attempt to lock blades and parry their attack. Make an attack roll with your longsword. You have advantage on this roll if you are wielding your longsword with two hands. If the result of this roll equals or exceeds their attack roll, their attack misses.
  • Short Draw. As an attack, you may draw a sheathed one-handed sword and make an attack roll to strike the enemy with its pommel, leaving the target gasping for breath. This attack deals no damage, but the next attack roll made against the target has advantage. You must have at least one hand free to take this action.
Rapier
  • Main Gauche. While wielding both a rapier and a dagger, you may use a reaction after being attacked to roll a d4 and add the result to your Armor Class until the end of the attacker’s turn.
  • Lock Blades. When a creature attacks you with a weapon, you may use your reaction to make an attack roll with your rapier. If the result of this roll equals or exceeds their attack roll, their attack misses.
Scimitar
  • Bloody Wound. When you hit a living creature with a scimitar, you can choose to make a superficial but bloody wound. The attack deals no damage, but the target takes 1d6 slashing damage at the beginning of each of its turns until it makes a DC 10 Wisdom (Medicine) check as an action to stop the bleeding or until it receives magical healing. A creature can have only one bloody wound at a time.
  • Short Draw. As an attack, you may draw a sheathed one-handed sword and make an attack roll to strike the enemy with its pommel, leaving the target gasping for breath. This attack deals no damage, but the next attack roll made against the target has advantage. You must have at least one hand free to take this action.
Shortsword
  • Close Quarters Combat. When you successfully grapple a creature or escape a grapple, you may make a single attack with a short sword as a bonus action. Additionally, whenever a creature fails to escape a grapple with you, you may make a single attack with a short sword as a reaction.
  • Short Draw. As an attack, you may draw a sheathed one-handed sword and make an attack roll to strike the enemy with its pommel, leaving the target gasping for breath. This attack deals no damage, but the next attack roll made against the target has advantage. You must have at least one hand free to take this action.

Polearms and Axes

Battleaxe
  • Crushing Blow. As an action, you can make a single attack roll with your battleaxe against an armored or naturally armored creature within 5 feet of you. If the attack hits, the target’s AC is permanently reduced by 1 until its armor is repaired, but cannot be reduced below 10 + the target’s Dexterity modifier. This attack has no effect on creatures with magical armor, unless your battleaxe is also magical.
Dwarven Tijino

The tijino poleaxe bears a long axe blade in front, with a long, looping backhook designed to unhorse riders. The tijino poleaxe has reach. You can strike opponents 10 feet away with it, but you cannot use it against an adjacent foe. As a polearm, tijino wielders can also use the disarming parry and trip maneuvers (see “Glaive”).

  • Unmount. As an action while wielding a tijino, you may make a single attack against a mounted creature. If the attack hits, the target must make a Strength saving throw. On a failure, the target is dismounted and falls prone.
Glaive
  • Disarming Parry. When a creature attacks you with a weapon, you may use your reaction to catch their weapon in your glaive’s hook and disarm them. Make an attack roll with your glaive. If the result of this roll equals or exceeds their attack roll, their attack misses and they must succeed on a Strength saving throw or drop their weapon.
  • Trip. As an attack while you are wielding a glaive, you may sweep your opponent’s legs in an attempt to trip them. Make an attack roll against a Large or smaller creature. If the attack hits, it must succeed on a Strength saving throw or fall prone.
Greataxe

The greataxe is a two-handed weapon built to sunder other weapons. Its edge is hardened especially for this purpose, and its haft is likewise set with trapping prongs to catch and hold a foe’s weapon. At the GM’s discretion, typical greataxes may also use the sundering strike maneuver.

  • Sundering Strike. As part of the attack action, make a single attack roll with your greataxe against a creature wielding a weapon, including natural weapons. If the attack hits, the weapon is damaged, and all attacks made with this weapon have disadvantage. Another sundering strike destroys the weapon. This attack has no effect on magical weapons, unless your greataxe is also magical.
  • Disarming Parry. When a creature attacks you with a weapon, you may use your reaction to catch their weapon in your greataxe’s prongs and disarm them. Make an attack roll with your greataxe. If the result of this roll equals or exceeds their attack roll, their attack misses, and they must succeed on a Strength saving throw or drop their weapon.
Halberd
  • Rebuff. As an attack while you are wielding a halberd, you may use the haft of your weapon to rebuff up to two adjacent creatures. Make a single attack roll against one or two adjacent creatures within 5 feet of you. If the attack hits a target, you push it up to 10 feet away from you.
  • Trip. As an attack while you are wielding a halberd, you may sweep your opponent’s legs in an attempt to trip them. Make an attack roll against a Large or smaller creature. If the attack hits, it must succeed on a Strength saving throw or fall prone.
Lance
  • Charge. If you move at least 20 feet straight toward a creature before hitting it with a lance attack, the target takes an extra 1d12 piercing damage and must make a Strength saving throw. On a failure, the target falls prone.
  • Repel Charge. As an action, you can set your lance against a charge. If a creature moves at least 20 feet straight toward you and attacks you, you may use your reaction to make an attack with your lance. If this attack hits, it is an automatic critical hit and the target must make a Strength saving throw. On a failure, it falls prone and falls off its mount if it is mounted.
Nurian Hook

A Nurian hook is a 1-foot-long square shaft that ends in a bronze hook with an arrow-shaped point at the pommel. Embalmers and butchers use it to hang up corpses.

  • Disarming Parry. When a creature attacks you with a weapon, you may use your reaction to catch their weapon in your hook and disarm them. Make an attack roll with your Nurian hook. If the result of this roll equals or exceeds their attack roll, their attack misses and they must succeed on a Strength saving throw or drop their weapon.
  • Trip. As an attack while you are wielding a Nurian hook, you may catch your opponent’s leg in an attempt to trip them. Make an attack roll against a Medium or smaller creature. If the attack hits, it must succeed on a Strength saving throw or fall prone.
Pike

As it is a polearm, a pike-wielder always has access to the disarming parry and trip maneuvers (see “Glaive”).

  • Phalanx. If you are adjacent to at least two other pike-wielders, your pike attacks have advantage.
  • Repel Charge. As an action, you can set your pike against a charge. If a creature moves at least 20 feet straight toward you and attacks you, you may use your reaction to make an attack with your pike before the attacker makes its attack roll. If your attack hits, it is an automatic critical hit, and the target has disadvantage on its attack roll.
Quarterstaff
  • Vault. You can use your quarterstaff to help you leap long distances. You can use an action to double the length of your long jump, allowing you to leap a number of feet up to twice your Strength score (this jump is part of your movement). If you land adjacent to a creature at the end of this jump, you can make a single attack with your quarterstaff as part of this action.
Trident
  • Pin. As an action, make an attack roll against a Medium creature you are grappling. If the attack hits, you catch one of the target’s limbs between the tines and bury the trident in the ground, restraining the creature until the weapon is dislodged. The target may make a Strength or Dexterity saving throw (their choice) at the end of each of their turns to escape.
  • Disarming Parry. When a creature attacks you with a weapon, you may use your reaction to catch their weapon in your trident’s tines and disarm them. Make an attack roll with your trident. If the result of this roll equals or exceeds their attack roll, their attack misses and they must succeed on a Strength saving throw or drop their weapon.
Other Polearms

Whether you’re wielding a fauchard, ranseur, or Bohemian earspoon, you can always use the disarming parry and trip maneuvers (see “Glaive”).

Hammers and Bludgeons

Club
  • Improvised Clobber. If you are using an improvised weapon that counts as a club, you may choose to strike with such force that your weapon breaks. As an action, make a single club attack. On a hit, this attack is an automatic critical hit and your improvised club breaks.
  • Blackjack. Make a single attack roll with your club against a humanoid target. If the attack hits, it does no damage, but the target must make a Constitution saving throw or be stunned until the beginning of its next turn.
Flail
  • Chain Garrote. While wielding a flail, you may attempt to grapple a creature by looping the chain of your flail around its neck. While grappled in this way, the creature cannot speak, cannot breathe, and has disadvantage on attack rolls against you. If you surprised the creature with this grapple, it cannot hold its breath and immediately begins suffocating. Creatures that you cannot grapple or do not need to breathe are unaffected by this maneuver.
  • Shield Snare. As an action while wielding a flail, you may make a single attack roll against a target carrying a shield or a similar defensive tool. This attack ignores any bonus to AC granted by the shield and deals normal weapon damage. If the attack hits, the target must also make a Strength saving throw. On a failure, its shield is pulled from its grip and lands at its feet.
Greatclub
  • Hurling Impact. As an action, you can make a single attack roll with your greatclub against a Medium or smaller target. If the attack hits, it does normal weapon damage and the target must make a Strength saving throw. On a failure, the target is pushed up to 5 feet away from you. On a critical hit, this attack does 2d8 extra damage and the greatclub breaks.
  • Ribshatter. Make a single attack roll with your greatclub against a humanoid target. This attack does normal weapon damage and the target must make a Constitution saving throw. On a failure, it is stunned until the beginning of its next turn. If the damage you dealt was greater than the creature’s maximum hit dice, it is stunned until the end of its next turn.
Mace and Morningstar
  • Bruising Blow. As an action, make a single attack roll with your mace or morningstar against a living creature. If the attack hits, it deals normal weapon damage and the target must make a Constitution saving throw. On a failure, the target does not add its Dexterity modifier to its AC until the end of your next turn or until it is treated with a DC 10 Wisdom (Medicine) check.
  • Ribshatter. Make a single attack roll with your mace or morningstar against a humanoid target. This attack does normal weapon damage and the target must make a Constitution saving throw. On a failure, it is stunned until the beginning of its next turn. If the damage you dealt was greater than the creature’s maximum hit dice, it is stunned until the end of its next turn.
Maul
  • Crushing Blow. As an action, you can make a single attack roll with your maul against an armored or naturally armored creature. If the attack hits, the target’s AC is permanently reduced by 1 until its armor is repaired, but it cannot be reduced below 10 + the target’s Dexterity modifier. This attack has no effect on creatures with magical armor unless your maul is also magical.
  • Hurling Impact. As an action, you can make a single attack roll with your maul against a Medium or smaller target. If the attack hits, it does normal weapon damage, and the target must make a Strength saving throw. On a failure, the target is pushed up to 15 feet away from you.
War Pick
  • Piercing Point. As an action, you may pinpoint a weak point of an opponent’s armor and make a single attack with your war pick against it. This attack pierces armor, treating the target’s AC as 10 + their Dexterity modifier. On a hit, this attack does normal weapon damage.
  • Trip. As an attack while you are wielding a war pick, you may hook your opponent’s leg in an attempt to trip them. Make an attack roll against a Medium or Small creature. If the attack hits, it must succeed on a Strength saving throw or fall prone.
Warhammer
  • Bruising Blow. As an action, make a single attack roll with your warhammer against a living creature. If the attack hits, it deals normal weapon damage, and the target must make a Constitution saving throw. On a failure, the target does not add its Dexterity modifier to its AC until the end of your next turn or until it is treated with a DC 10 Wisdom (Medicine) check.
  • Sundering Strike. As an attack, make an attack roll with your warhammer against a creature wielding a weapon, including natural weapons. If the attack hits, the weapon is damaged, and all attacks made with this weapon have disadvantage. Another sundering strike destroys the weapon. This attack has no effect on magical weapons unless your warhammer is also magical.
Whip
  • Bullwhip. As part of your attack action, make a whip attack against a beast or a creature with an Intelligence score of 2 or lower. The target must make a Wisdom saving throw or be frightened of you until the end of its next turn.
  • Snare. As part of your attack action, you may snap your whip around a creature or its weapon. If you target the weapon, the creature must make a Strength saving throw or drop its weapon at its feet. If you target the creature, it must make a Strength saving throw or be restrained. It may repeat this saving throw at the end of each of its turns. You cannot make whip attacks until the restrained condition is ended.

Thrown Weapons

Dagger

These maneuvers can also be used with dagger-like bladed throwing weapons such as shuriken or kunai.

  • Pinning Point. When you make a melee or ranged weapon attack with a dagger, you may attempt to pin a Large or smaller creature to a wall or surface by catching their clothing with the knife’s point. This maneuver can be used against creatures without clothing at the GM’s discretion. Make an attack roll; if the attack hits, the target must make a Strength saving throw. On a failure, the target’s speed is reduced to zero until the dagger is removed. The target can make another Strength saving throw as an action on its turn.
  • Concealed Blade. Instead of making a Dexterity (Stealth) check to hide yourself, you may make a Dexterity (Sleight of Hand) check—contested by an active or passive Wisdom (Perception) check—to conceal your dagger. As an action, you may make a weapon attack with a concealed dagger against a creature that has not yet acted in combat. This attack has advantage.
Handaxe
  • Pinning Edge. When you make a melee or ranged weapon attack with a hand axe, you may attempt to pin a Large or smaller creature to a wall or surface by catching their clothing with the axe’s edge. This maneuver can be used against creatures without clothing at the GM’s discretion. Make an attack roll; if the attack hits, the target must make a Strength saving throw. On a failure, the target’s speed is reduced to zero until the axe is removed. The target can make another Strength saving throw as an action on its turn.
Javelin
  • Fearsome Accuracy. As an attack, you may throw your javelin at a creature at the very limit of your range. Make an attack roll against a creature exactly 120 feet away. If the attack hits, the creature takes normal damage and must make a Wisdom saving throw. On a failure, the creature becomes frightened of you for 1 minute.
  • Trip. As a melee weapon attack while you are wielding a javelin, you may sweep your opponent’s legs in an attempt to trip them. Make an attack roll against a Large or smaller creature. If the attack hits, it must succeed on a Strength saving throw or fall prone.
Light Hammer
  • Dazing Blow. As an action, you may make a single ranged weapon attack with a light hammer. If the attack hits, the target must make a Constitution saving throw or be incapacitated until the end of its next turn.
  • Sunder Joints. When you make a melee weapon attack against a creature in medium or heavy armor with a light hammer, you may choose to damage the joints of their armor instead of dealing damage to the creature. If the attack hits, the creature’s movement is reduced by 10 feet until the end of their next turn. This reduction is not cumulative.
Net

Nets have the unique property, Ensnaring, described below.

Ensnaring: A Large or smaller creature hit by a net is restrained until it is freed. A net has no effect on creatures that are formless, or creatures that are Huge or larger. A creature can use its action to make a DC 10 Strength check, freeing itself or another creature within its reach on a success. Dealing 5 slashing damage to the net (AC 10) also frees the creature without harming it, ending the effect and destroying the net.

  • Blinding Binds. Instead of restraining your foe, you may instead wrap the thick cords of your net around a single creature’s head. A Large or smaller creature hit by a net when you use this maneuver is blinded but is not restrained, until the net is removed.
  • Wing-Wrapping Net. Instead of restraining a flying creature, you may entangle its wings in your net. A Huge or smaller winged creature hit by a net when you use this maneuver has its fly speed reduced to 0 (but is not restrained) until the net is removed.

Ranged Weapons

Blowgun

A blowgun has no specific maneuvers to use in combat, but a character with a poisoner’s kit (50 gp) can spend a short rest creating one of the following simple poisons. Applying a poison to a blowgun dart is a bonus action, and each vial of poison has 10 uses before it must be created again. A poison’s effects are in addition to the 1 piercing damage dealt by a blow dart.

  • Deathtoad Toxin. A creature hit by a dart coated with this poison must make a DC 10 Constitution saving throw. On a failure, it takes 2d6 poison damage. Chuul Ichor. A creature hit by a dart coated with this poison must make a DC 10 Constitution saving throw. On a failure, it is paralyzed until the beginning of its next turn.
  • Svirfneblin Wooziness Tonic. A creature hit by a dart coated with this poison must make a DC 10 Constitution saving throw. On a failure, it is poisoned until the end of its next turn.
Composite Bow

The composite bow’s unique construction gives it an incredibly heavy draw, making it usable only by the strongest archers. Characters with Strength 14 or lower have disadvantage on attacks made with a composite bow.

  • Power Shot. When you make an attack with a composite bow, you may take a penalty on your attack roll equal to your Strength modifier. This penalty must be applied before the roll is made. If the attack hits, it deals additional damage equal to twice your Strength modifier.
  • Staggering Shot. As an action while wielding a composite bow, you may make a single ranged weapon attack. If this attack hits, the enemy takes full weapon damage and must make a Constitution saving throw. On a failure, the target’s speed is reduced to 0 until the end of its next turn.
Heavy Crossbow and Light Crossbow

In campaign settings with firearms, these maneuvers can also be used by a character who wields a rifle.

  • Shrapnel Shot. As an action, make a single attack with your crossbow against an unattended object. The attack deals double damage to the target. If the object is destroyed, it explodes into a cloud of shrapnel. Choose one of the following options:
    • Creatures within 5 feet of the object must make a Dexterity saving throw, taking 1d6 piercing damage on a failure. A creature adjacent to the object must make a Constitution saving throw. On a failure, the creature is blinded until the beginning of your next turn.
    • Patient Shot. You carefully align your crossbow’s sights over your target. As an action in a turn that you have not moved, you may make a single crossbow attack with advantage.
Hand Crossbow

In campaign settings with firearms, these maneuvers can also be used by a character who wields a pistol.

  • Concealed Sidearm. Instead of making a Dexterity (Stealth) check to hide yourself, you may make a Dexterity (Sleight of Hand) check—contested by an active or passive Wisdom (Perception) check—to conceal your hand crossbow. As an action, you may make a weapon attack with a concealed crossbow against a creature that has not yet acted in combat. This attack has advantage.
  • Rapid Shot. You rapidly reload your hand crossbow, throwing off your aim but allowing you to make an additional attack this turn. As a bonus action, you may reload your hand crossbow and make an attack with it against a target within 30 feet. This attack has disadvantage.
Longbow and Shortbow

Pinning Shot. When you make an attack with a bow, you may attempt to pin a Large or smaller creature to a wall or surface by catching their clothing with the arrow’s point. This maneuver can be used against creatures without clothing at the GM’s discretion. Make an attack roll; if the attack hits, the target must make a Strength saving throw. On a failure, the target’s speed is reduced to 0 until the arrow is removed. The target can make another Strength saving throw as an action on its turn.

  • Distracting Shot. As an action, make a single attack with your bow. You intentionally miss your target but give an ally the chance to attack while it is distracted. The next attack roll against the target has advantage if it is made before the beginning of the target’s next turn.
  • Trick Shot. As an action, make a single stylish bow attack with disadvantage. If the lower roll would also hit the target, you automatically score a critical hit.
Sling
  • Underdog Strike. As an action, you may make a single ranged weapon attack with your sling against a creature at least 1 size category larger than you. This attack deals normal weapon damage, and an extra 1d4 bludgeoning damage per size category difference.
  • Headcrack. As an action, you may make a single ranged weapon attack with your sling. If the attack hits, the target must make a Constitution saving throw or be stunned until the beginning of its next turn.
Estoc

A hand-and-a-half sword designed to pierce heavy armor and sharpened only on the tip, an estoc is 4 feet long, sometimes with a second crossguard. It is said to have been used first against the elves, but now is used by dwarven mercenaries and human knights who expect to fight other heavily armored warriors. Its anti-armor properties make it popular with monster hunters and dragon slayers as well. The estoc also has the following special property.

  • Special: The estoc deals an additional 1d6 damage to creatures wearing heavy armor, or naturally armored creatures with an AC of 16 or higher.
  • Armor-Piercing Thrust. As an action, you may pinpoint a weak point of an opponent’s armor and make a single attack with your estoc against it. This attack pierces armor, treating the target’s AC as 10 + their Dexterity modifier. On a hit, this attack does normal weapon damage, and does not deal the additional damage granted by the estoc’s special property (above).
  • Blunted Bash. Instead of dealing piercing damage, you can choose to deal bludgeoning damage by striking the target with the estoc’s unsharpened blade. This attack’s damage die is one size smaller than normal (1d4 if one-handed, 1d6 if two-handed), and cannot benefit from the estoc’s special property (below).
Poniard

This longsword has a spring-loaded poniard concealed in the hilt, which quickly extends when the hilt is gripped in a particular way. It is particularly beloved by rogues, as the concealed blade helps them sneak attack opponents already locked in combat. Kariv of a crueler bent have been known to poison the secondary blade. Thanks to its hidden blade, the poniard has the following special ability:

  • Special: The larger blade is a versatile weapon, and the secondary blade is a light weapon. You may make an attack with the secondary blade as bonus action, as if you were two-weapon fighting. Retracting the poniard requires an action.
  • Hidden Poniard. If the poniard is still concealed within your sword’s hilt, you may make a Dexterity (Sleight of Hand) check opposed by a target creature’s Wisdom (Perception) check. If you win this contest, you may make a single attack roll with the concealed poniard against that target. This attack has advantage.
Scorpion Stiletto

The scorpion stiletto appears as an ornate, ceremonial knife, but its beauty distracts from the deadly poison secreted within. This knife is now wielded mostly by assassins and cutthroat politicians.

Other than the two properties described below, the only difference between a standard dagger and a scorpion stiletto is price. The stiletto is a specialized assassination tool, so no one can just walk into a shop and buy one. A purchaser must either find a disreputable merchant who’ll sell one under the table or a disreputable smith who’ll make one to order. In either case, the price must be negotiated. Any maneuver that can be used with a dagger can also be used with a scorpion stiletto.

  • Concealed Blade. Instead of making a Dexterity (Stealth) check to hide yourself, you may make a Dexterity (Sleight of Hand) check—contested by an active or passive Wisdom (Perception) check—to conceal your stiletto. As an action, you may make a weapon attack with a concealed dagger against a creature that has not yet acted in combat. This attack has advantage.
  • Release Venom. A vial of venom can be loaded into the handle of this stiletto. As a bonus action, you can press the jewel on the dagger’s pommel to release the venom into a groove on the blade. Any type of injury poison can be loaded into the stiletto’s hidden chamber, but the most common is emerald scorpion venom.

Emerald Scorpion Venom (Injury). A creature subjected to this poison must make a DC 16 Constitution saving throw at the beginning of each of its turns, taking 24 (7d6) poison damage on a failed saving throw, or half as much on a successful one. This poison lasts until the target succeeds on three saving throws or is magically cured.

Name Cost Damage Weight Properties
Simple Melee Weapons
Hook, Nurian 6 gp 1d6 piercing 6 lb. Finesse, Light
Stiletto See text 1d4 piercing 1 lb. Finesse, light, thrown (range 20/60)
Colpik, hurled 3 gp 1d4 piercing 2 lb. Light, thrown (range 20/60)
Martial Melee Weapons
Agrogash (hook-bearded hatchet) 12 gp 1d6 slashing 4 lb. Light
Catchpole 12 gp 1d4 piercing 8 lb. Heavy, reach, two-handed
Dikama 10 gp 1d4 slashing 3 lb. Light
Dwarven Tijino 25 gp 2d4 piercing 12 lb. Heavy, reach, two-handed
Estoc 40 gp 1d6 piercing 3 lb. Special, versatile (1d8)
Greataxe 50 gp 1d12 slashing 8 lb. Heavy, two-handed
Gorgash (double-headed battleaxe) 20 gp 1d8 slashing Heavy, two-handed
Granite fists 50 gp 1d4 bludgeoning 10 lb. Heavy
Joining blades 200 gp 1d6 slashing (unjoined) 2d6 slashing (joined) 3 lb. (each) Finesse, light (unjoined) finesse (joined)
Poniard 100 gp 1d8 piercing/1d4 piercing 4 lb. Special, versatile (1d10)
Martial Ranged Weapons
Bolas, windrunner 50 gp Special (see below) 4 lb. Light, thrown (30/60)
Bologorash (chained hand axe) 25 gp 1d6 slashing 4 lb. Thrown (20/60), two-handed
Boomerang, windrunner 25 gp (standard)/30 gp (bladed) 1d4 bludgeoning (standard)/1d4 slashing (bladed) 3 lb. (standard)/4 lb. (bladed) Light, thrown (100/300)
Bow, Composite 100 gp 1d12 piercing 8 lb. Ammunition (range 150/600), heavy, special, two-handed
Dragonhead 200 gp 1d12 piercing 15 lb. Ammunition, heavy, loading, range 20/40, two-handed
Ammunition
Alchemical iron-ball (10) 10 gp 3 lb.

Monk Weapons

Bo

The bo (sometimes redundantly called a bo staff in the West and a kon in Okinawa) is a nearly 6-foot-long fighting staff used most frequently in Okinawan martial arts. Monks that follow the Way of the Open Hand typically learn to fight with a bo during their training. This weapon is mechanically identical to a quarterstaff, and a monk can also use these maneuvers while wielding a quarterstaff.

  • Lunge. As an action, you can make a single melee attack roll with your bo against an enemy within 10 feet of you. If the attack hits, you can switch positions with the target, as long as nothing physically prevents the target from moving.
  • Vault. You can use your bo to help you leap long distances. You can use an action to double the length of your long jump, allowing you to leap a number of feet up to twice your Strength score (this jump is part of your movement). If you land adjacent to a creature at the end of this jump, you can make a single attack with your bo as part of this action.
Daito

The term daito refers to any Japanese longsword, including the famous katana. Most daito are curved blades with a single slashing edge, though some ancient Japanese swords like the chokut? or the tsurugi were straight blades with two slashing edges, not unlike the European longsword. The daito is mechanically identical to a longsword, and a monk can also use these maneuvers while wielding a longsword.

  • Death in a Single Stroke. On the first round of combat, you may spend 1 ki point to make a single melee attack with your daito as an action. This attack scores a critical hit on a roll of 19 or 20. If this attack does score a critical hit, you may spend an additional ki point to cause the attack to deal an additional 2d8 damage. These damage dice are not doubled by the critical hit.
  • Lock Blades. When a creature attacks you with a weapon, you may use your reaction to attempt to lock blades and parry their attack. Make an attack roll with your longsword. You have advantage on this roll if you are wielding your longsword with two hands. If the result of this roll equals or exceeds their attack roll, their attack misses.
  • Short Draw. As an attack, you may draw a sheathed one-handed sword and make an attack roll to strike the enemy with its pommel, leaving the target gasping for breath. This attack deals no damage, but the next attack roll made against the target has advantage. You must have at least one hand free to take this action.
Kanabo

In feudal Japan, the kanabo was a two-handed club lined with metal studs, often used by samurai. It was also a weapon said to be wielded by the mythical oni, and as such, an oni can also use these maneuvers while wielding a kanabo. This weapon is mechanically identical to a greatclub, and a monk can also use these maneuvers while wielding a greatclub.

  • Crushing Blow. As an action, you can make a single melee attack roll with your kanabo against an armored or naturally armored creature. If the attack hits, the target’s AC is permanently reduced by 1 until its armor is repaired but cannot be reduced below 10 + the target’s Dexterity modifier. This attack has no effect on creatures with magical armor unless your kanabo is also magical.
  • Reckless Swing. The first attack you make with a kanabo this turn deals an extra 2d6 bludgeoning damage. If you miss with this attack, the target can make an attack against you as a reaction unless you spend 1 ki point.
Kunai

The real-world kunai was a gardening and masonry tool, sometimes used like a crowbar or a piton by Japanese farmers. This peasant tool was eventually adopted by ninja as a short stabbing weapon. Decades of exaggeration in Japanese pop culture has transformed the kunai into a ninja’s throwing dagger—an iconic weapon for East Asian-inspired fantasy. This weapon is mechanically identical to a dagger, and a monk can also use these maneuvers while wielding a dagger.

  • Ascendant Grip. When you deal damage to a creature that is larger than you with a kunai, the kunai remains embedded in its body and can be used a handhold or piton. You and other monks have advantage on Strength (Athletics) checks to climb creatures spiked with at least one kunai per size category larger than Medium. A creature can remove a kunai by making a successful DC 10 Wisdom (Medicine) check. You can spend 1 ki point as a reaction to impose disadvantage on this check.
  • Spirit Chain. When you hit a creature that is your size or smaller with a kunai, you can spend 1 ki point to manifest a pseudo-physical chain between your body and your weapon. You can choose to pull either the creature toward you by making a successful Strength check opposed by its Strength check or yourself toward the creature a number of feet up to your movement. This chain of spiritual energy disappears at the end of your turn.
Nagae-yari

Japanese longspears, known as nagae-yari, were weapons used by samurai and peasants alike. These pikes were visually distinguished from simpler spears by their exceptionally long tangs— perpendicular metallic spikes, protruding from the spearhead—that were often as long as the spearhead itself. By the 16th century, the nagae-yari became the primary weapon of Japanese armies. This weapon is mechanically identical to a pike, and a monk can also use these maneuvers while wielding a pike, a trident, or a spear.

  • Disarming Parry. When a creature attacks you with a weapon, you may use your reaction to catch their weapon with your nagae-yari’s tangs and disarm them. Make an attack roll with your nagae-yari. If the result of this roll equals or exceeds their attack roll, their attack misses, and they must succeed on a Strength saving throw or drop their weapon.
  • Pinning Lunge. As an action, you can make a single melee attack roll with a nagae-yari against a creature within 10 feet of you. If this attack hits, it deals no damage, but you can attempt to pin a Large or smaller creature to a wall, the ground, or another surface by catching their clothing with the weapon’s point. This maneuver can be used against creatures without clothing at the GM’s discretion. The target must make a Strength saving throw. On a failure, the target’s speed is reduced to zero until the spear is removed. The target may repeat this saving throw as an action.
Naginata

The Buddhist warrior-monks known as s?hei were among the most famous wielders of naginata polearms in feudal and medieval Japan. Additionally, female samurai known as onna-bugeisha were trained in the naginata, both to protect their family and in certain cases, such as that of the legendary Empress Jing?, to lead revolutions. This weapon is mechanically identical to a glaive, and a monk can also use these maneuvers while wielding a glaive.

  • Swap Blades. As a bonus action, you can remove the blade of a naginata and use it as a short sword. As an action, you can swap blades and also make a single melee attack with the short sword. You cannot use the Wide Sweep maneuver while wielding a naginata blade a short sword.
  • Wide Sweep. By spending 1 ki point, you can select one creature that you can see. If that creature enters your range, you can make an attack against it as a reaction. If that attack hits, the creature’s movement is reduced to 0 until the end of its turn.
Nunchaku

In Okinawan karate, nunchaku (or nunchucks in the West), were a training tool used to improve a martial artist’s coordination and speed. Bruce Lee popularized the nunchaku as a street-fighting weapon in his martial arts films. This weapon is mechanically identical to a flail, and a monk can also use these maneuvers while wielding a flail.

  • Chain Garrote. You may attempt to grapple a creature by looping the tether of your nunchaku around its neck. While grappled in this way, the creature cannot speak, cannot breathe, and has disadvantage on attack rolls against you. If you surprised the creature with this grapple, it cannot hold its breath and immediately begins suffocating. Creatures that you cannot grapple or do not need to breathe are unaffected by this maneuver.
  • Spinning Shield. When you take the Dodge action while wielding nunchaku, you also gain half cover against ranged weapon attacks. If your nunchaku are magical, you also gain half cover against ranged spell attacks.
No-dachi

The no-dachi is a large sword with a single cutting edge, typically used by samurai in the Muromachi period. These massive swords carried immense power, and fighting with one emphasized strong, downward cuts. Just like the German zweihänder and Scottish claymore, no-dachi were rarely worn on a warrior’s person. Typically, a follower would carry the sword and hold its scabbard as the warrior drew the weapon. The no-dachi is mechanically identical to a greatsword, and a monk can also use these maneuvers while wielding a greatsword.

Arcing Slash. When you make a melee weapon attack with an no-dachi, you may choose to target two creatures within your reach with a single attack. This attack uses the same attack roll for both targets and deals slashing damage equal to 1d6 plus your Strength modifier to each target.

  • Grinding Halt. Whenever you must make a Strength saving throw to avoid being moved against your will, you can dig the blade of your no-dachi into the ground as a reaction. Roll 2d6 and add the number rolled to the saving throw. If the effect pushing you does not have a saving throw, you move 5 feet fewer.
  • Overhand Cleave. When you make a melee weapon attack with an no-dachi, you may make the attack with disadvantage. If the attack hits, it deals an additional 1d6 damage.
Ono

As with most monk weapons, the ono or masa-kari axe was not designed for war but was adapted from farmers’ tools. This simple battleaxe is strongly associated with the legendary folk hero Kintar?, a child of superhuman strength raised by a y?kai spirit atop a mountain. This weapon is mechanically identical to a battleaxe, and a monk can also use this maneuver while wielding a battleaxe. In the rare occasion that ono were made for war, they could have hafts up to six feet long, making it more akin to a halberd.

  • Crushing Blow. As an action, you can make a single attack roll with your ono against an armored or naturally armored creature within 5 feet of you. If the attack hits, the target’s AC is permanently reduced by 1 until its armor is repaired, but it cannot be reduced below 10 + the target’s Dexterity modifier. This attack has no effect on creatures with magical armor unless your ono is also magical.
  • Stone-Splitting Strike. As an action, you can spend 1 ki point and make a single attack roll with your ono against a creature within reach. If the target is resistant to slashing damage, this attack ignores its resistance. If the target is instead immune to slashing damage, it treats its immunity as a resistance to slashing damage instead.
Shuriken

The shuriken was the most iconic ninja weapon never actually used by ninja. Shuriken were disposable, concealed throwing weapons used by samurai to distract or poison enemies before striking with a blade. The popular image of a shuriken is a bladed throwing star, but other historical shuriken included the dart-shaped bo-shuriken and four-pointed throwing needles. This weapon is mechanically identical to a dart, and a monk can also use these maneuvers while wielding a dart.

  • Distracting Barrage. When you make a ranged attack with a shuriken, you can spend 1 ki point to also manifest an illusory barrage of shuriken, granting you advantage on the attack roll.
  • Invisible Swordsman. As an action, you can make a single ranged attack roll with a shuriken against an enemy that cannot see you. The range of this attack is doubled. This attack does not reveal your location to your target, and the shuriken cannot be found unless a creature makes a successful DC 15 Wisdom (Perception) check to search for it.
Tonfa

The tonfa was a traditional weapon in Okinawan armed martial arts. They are short clubs with a perpendicular secondary grip. This weapon is mechanically identical to a club, but a monk cannot use tonfa maneuvers while wielding a club.

  • Disarming Parry. By reversing your grip, the handle of the tonfa becomes a hook. When a creature attacks you with a weapon, you may use your reaction to catch their weapon in your tonfa’s hook and disarm them. Make an attack roll with your tonfa. If the result of this roll equals or exceeds their attack roll, the creature’s attack misses, and it must succeed on a Strength saving throw or drop its weapon.
  • Focused Jab. The tonfa focuses all the force of a jab into a small point. You can spend 1 ki point as part of the Attack action to make your tonfa attacks ignore resistance to bludgeoning damage for 1 minute.
Unarmed Strike

The quintessential weapon of a martial artist, the unarmed strike is an easy way to simplify thousands of complex and unique martial arts into a single game mechanic. These maneuvers highlight the unique methods of certain martial styles without undoing this simplification.

  • Butterfly Kick. The xuan zi maneuver in real-life Chinese martial arts is an impractical acrobatic flourish, but in a fantasy setting, this kick can be used as a defensive technique. As an action, you can make a single melee attack roll with your unarmed strike. If this attack hits, you can immediately take the Dodge action, requiring no action.
  • Gentle Rebuke. Inspired by the martial art of j?d?, this maneuver allows a monk to defend themself without attacking. Whenever you make an attack as a Reaction, you can make the attack a Gentle Rebuke. This attack does not deal damage, but you can choose to throw the target up to 10 feet away, where it lands prone. This attack has no effect if the target is more than one size category larger than you.

Dwarven Weapons

The following weapons are crafted by dwarves.

Dragonhead

By packing liquid alchemical explosives and small iron pellets into a long metal tube, dwarven weaponsmiths have created a powerful weapon they call a dragonhead. While this weapon can shoot projectiles, its limited range makes it more suitable for front-line or middle-rank warriors. The difficulty of both smelting such a weapon and creating its alchemical ammunition makes the dragonhead a rare weapon; it is generally only used by royal guards, mad alchemists, and warriors that have looted one from one of the former.

This weapon uses alchemical iron-balls as ammunition. This hollow, 1-inch-diameter pellet contains a volatile alchemical fluid that is ignited by lighting a fuse atop the dragonhead. The explosion propels the ball a short distance from the cannon’s mouth.

  • Double Pack. By cramming twice the usual amount of explosive material into a dragonhead’s barrel, a reckless warrior can double the range and lethality of their weapon. Make a single attack roll with disadvantage. This attack consumes two alchemical iron-balls, has a range of 80 feet, and deals 2d12 piercing damage on a hit.
  • Fiery Discharge. By cracking open an alchemical iron-ball and pouring its liquid straight into the weapon’s barrel, you can cause the weapon to belch forth fire. When you use this maneuver as an action, you take 1d4 fire damage and make a single melee attack roll against a creature within 5 feet of you. If this attack hits, the target takes 1d12 fire damage.
Granite Fist

A favorite weapon of dwarven gangsters, granite fists are a brutal pair of gauntlets designed specifically to break bones. These stone gauntlets are perpetually curled into a fist and contain an iron bar inside for the wielder to grip. There are dozens of variations on granite fists, and most gangs have a special variation unique to them; some fists are made of iron instead of granite, some have spikes on the knuckles, and some are shaped like open palms instead of clenched fists.

  • Bonebreaker. As an action, you can make a single attack roll with your granite fist against a creature that is not wearing armor and does not have natural armor. This maneuver affects unarmored creatures whose base AC has been increased by class features but not by spells. If this attack deals damage, the target must make a Constitution saving throw. On a failure, the target’s speed is reduced by 10 until it completes a long rest or is treated with a DC 10 Wisdom (Medicine) check. This reduction in speed is cumulative.
  • Crushing Blow. As an action, you can make a single attack roll with your granite fist against an armored or naturally armored creature. If the attack hits, the target’s AC is permanently reduced by 1 until its armor is repaired, but it cannot be reduced below 10 + the target’s Dexterity modifier. This attack has no effect on creatures with magical armor unless your granite fist is also magical.
Hurled Colpik

At first glance, this dwarven weapon resembles nothing more than a tiny pickaxe with a very long handle. The colpik—a bastardized form of the words “coal pick” in the Common tongue—is a throwing weapon first designed by a group of dwarven miners. These common laborers, untrained in the arts of war, had to improvise weapons when beset by sling-wielding goblins deep in a coal mine. Modern colpiks are specifically designed as throwing weapons and can be thrown with much greater accuracy than their ancient, improvised counterparts. Throughout the centuries, colpiks have been the typical weapon for dwarves untrained in martial combat.

  • Blunt Edge. When you make an attack with a colpik, you can choose to deal bludgeoning damage instead of piercing damage. If this damage reduces a creature to 0 hit points, the creature falls unconscious and is stable, even if the attack was a ranged attack.
  • Mining Point. As an action while wielding a colpik, you may make a single melee or ranged attack against a nonliving target within range. This target can be an object or a creature with the construct or undead type. If this attack hits, its damage ignores the object’s damage threshold (if any) or the creature’s resistance to bludgeoning or piercing damage.
Other Dwarven Weapons

In addition to these weapons, the dwarven tijino polearm, the nordmansch greataxe, and the northlands estoc were described in Beyond Damage Dice.

Elven Weapons

The following weapons are crafted by elves and half elves, using methods passed down throughout the ages.

Joining Blades

Wood elves are skilled and versatile warriors and can craft weapons just as adaptable as their wielders. During their training, these elves become masters of fighting both with dual small blades and single large blades. For these warriors, the master elven smiths developed an elegant weapon that could be wielded both as a pair of blades to be used against multiple foes at once and then joined together to form a two-bladed greatsword for single combat. When separated, a pair of joining blades are identical to scimitars. When joined, the blades form a double-sword with two blades protruding from a central hilt; this blade is a greatsword with the finesse property. You can join or unjoin the blades as a bonus action. You can use scimitar maneuvers and greatsword maneuvers as described in Beyond Damage Dice with this weapon when it is in the appropriate form.

  • Elegant Separation. You can decouple your blades in one fluid motion. After you take the Attack action with a joined greatsword, you can separate the blades into two scimitars as part of that action.
  • Spinning Shield. When you take the Dodge action while wielding the joined greatsword, you also gain half cover against ranged weapon attacks. If your joining blades are magical, you also gain half cover against ranged spell attacks.
Windrunner Bolas

Bolas are thrown weapons of the elves of the plains, used to capture all sorts of fleeing creatures, from beasts to nomads to unfortunate adventurers. Bolas are made from ball-shaped weights tied together by a length of cord, and they were invented by real-world South American tribes as a hunting tool. Bolas use maneuvers similar to the net, originally presented in Beyond Damage Dice.

When a creature is hit by a ranged weapon attack made with bolas, it must make a Strength saving throw with a DC equal to 8 + your proficiency bonus + your Strength or Dexterity modifier (your choice). On a failed save, the creature is restrained until the bolas are removed. On a successful save, the creature takes 1d4 bludgeoning damage as the bola strikes it, but they do not become entangled.

A creature can use its action to make a DC 10 Strength check, freeing itself or another creature within its reach on a success. Dealing 5 slashing damage to the cord (AC 10) also frees the creature without harming it, ending the effect and destroying the bolas.

  • Suffocating Binds. Instead of restraining your foe, you may instead wrap the thick cords of your bolas around a single creature’s neck. A Large or smaller creature that fails a Strength saving throw against your bolas attack when you use this maneuver is not restrained but cannot breathe until it is freed.
  • Wing-Tying Cord. Instead of restraining a flying creature, you may entangle its wings in the cord of your bolas. A Huge or smaller winged creature that fails its saving throw against your bolas attack when you use this maneuver has its fly speed reduced to 0 (but is not restrained) until it is freed.
Windrunner Boomerang

When subduing their prey with bolas does not suffice, elves of the plains use a specialized boomerang to slay fleeing marks. Windrunner boomerangs are made of wood or bone and (unlike real-world boomerangs) sometimes have a bladed slashing edge. Boomerangs were invented by real-world Aboriginal Australian as a hunting tool and may have been used by ancient peoples as long as 50,000 years ago. A boomerang thrown within its short range returns to you after it is thrown. If you have a Dexterity score of 15 or higher, you automatically catch the returning boomerang. If not, you must make a DC 15 Dexterity saving throw to catch it. On a failed saving throw, the boomerang lands at your feet. If you fail this saving throw by 5 or more, the boomerang strikes you, dealing 1d4 bludgeoning damage (or slashing damage if it is a bladed boomerang).

  • Windsweep Arc. As an action, you can make a single ranged attack roll with your boomerang against a target within short range. If the attack misses, the boomerang continues its flying arc, and you choose another creature within short range to attack. If that attack misses, you may choose a third creature within short range to attack. If that attack misses, the boomerang returns to you as normal. All attacks made as a part of this maneuver use the same attack roll.

Kobold Weapons

The following weapons are haphazardly cobbled together by urban kobolds.

Catchpole

The catchpole, also known as a man catcher, was once a popular tool of the constabulary for nonlethally apprehending criminals. This polearm has a circular two-pronged head instead of an axe or a spear tip. This pronged head allows the wielder to snap the loop shut around their target’s neck to entrap them or pull the target from a speeding horse, drag them to the ground, and pin them. Versions of the man catcher were independently created in 18th-century Europe, Edo-period Japan, and in pre-colonial Papua New Guinea. The catchpole has fallen out of favor in recent years, and kobolds have seized upon massive stockpiles of the discarded weapons. As they were designed for human-sized guards, catchpoles are too large for a single kobold to wield on their own. However, a group of two or three kobolds working in unison can use a catchpole to snatch unsuspecting passersby off the street—and then drop them in a back alley where dozens more of their warren await with knives drawn.

  • Snag. When you hit a Medium or smaller creature with a catchpole attack, you can choose to grapple the target instead of dealing damage. While grappling a creature in this way, your speed is not reduced, and you can make a Strength (Athletics) check to move the target a number of feet equal to the result of your check. This special grapple has an escape DC equal to your maneuver save DC.
  • Hurl. When you have a creature grappled in your catchpole (see Snag above), you can end the grapple to throw the creature a number of feet equal to your Strength score. You can throw the first creature at another target as an improvised ranged weapon attack. On a hit, both the target and the hurled creature take 1d4 bludgeoning damage. On a miss, only the hurled creature takes damage.
  • Trip. As an attack while you are wielding a catchpole, you may sweep your opponent’s legs in an attempt to trip them. Make an attack roll against a Medium or smaller creature. If the attack hits, it must succeed on a Strength saving throw or fall prone.
Dropped Rock

All kobolds know how to drop rocks on an unsuspecting target, but the most expert of kobold rock-droppers know that there are special techniques to letting a stone plummet atop a stupid gnome’s head. Winged kobolds make particularly good use of this technique as their gods-given gift of flight lets them reach heights other kobolds can only dream of.

Dropping a heavy rock is a ranged weapon attack that deals 1d4 bludgeoning damage, plus an extra 1d4 damage for every 30 feet it falls, up to a maximum of 5d4 bludgeoning damage. Dropped rock attacks have disadvantage if the rock is dropped from more than 60 feet above the target. A dropped rock can only target a creature directly below you.

  • Bounced Rock. If a rock hits the ground hard enough, it can bounce when it hits the ground and potentially strike another nearby creature. When you make a dropped rock attack, you can declare that you are trying to bounce the rock. This attack has disadvantage, but if the attack misses, another creature within 5 feet of the original target must make a Dexterity saving throw or take 1d4 bludgeoning damage.
  • Spin Drop. By putting a spin on the rock before dropping it, you can target a creature not directly below you. The target can be up to 10 feet away from the space directly beneath you for every 30 feet the rock falls. This attack deals 1d4 less damage than a normal dropped rock attack.
Hastily Assembled Explosive

If there’s one thing kobolds love, it’s jury-rigging explosives. If there’s one thing kobolds hate, it’s taking enough time to make sure they did it right. By using a small clay pot, 20 gp worth of black powder, a small fuse, and a strange assortment of other odds and ends, any kobold can make its own improvised explosive.

A bomb has a fuse that burns for 1 round. When it explodes, all creatures in a 5-foot radius of the bomb must make a DC 12 Dexterity saving throw, taking 1d6 fire damage on a failed save or half as much damage on a successful one. The bomb also has a random side effect, rolled on the table below.

d4 Effect
1 The bomb is a dud. It doesn’t explode and deals no damage.
2 Kobold incense within the bomb spreads the thick scent of patchouli throughout the area instead of the smell of black powder.
3 Sticky kobold goop within the bomb makes the bomb’s radius difficult terrain.
4 Kobold dung within the bomb forces all creatures within the bomb’s radius to make a DC 12 Constitution saving throw, becoming poisoned for 1 minute on a failed save.

Orcish Weapons

The following weapons are crafted by orcs using methods passed down throughout the ages.

Agrogash

The orcish agrogash—literally, “wrath-pulling blade”—is more typically known as the “hook-bearded battleaxe” for the serrated hook at the bottom of the axe-head. This axe is typically the lightest and smallest weapon used by orcs as they typically employ it while wielding a short sword in the other hand. First, the orc “hooks” their target with the long beard of their axe, drawing the target in, and then they skewer it with their off-hand blade.

  • Tiger’s Jaws. If you hit a creature of your size or smaller with two melee weapon attacks while wielding an agrogash in both hands, you can make a DC 10 Strength check. On a success, you lift the creature by the hooks of your axes and throw it a number of feet equal to the result of the check.
  • Scorpion’s Sting. As an action, make a melee weapon attack with your agrogash against a creature within 10 feet of you. On a hit, you draw the creature into your space. Your next melee attack against this creature this turn has advantage.
Bologorash

The orcish bologorash—literally, “flesh-rending flying blade”—is a wicked, serrated throwing axe attached to a 30-foot length of chain. Used most often as a pit-fighting or gladiatorial weapon, orcs wield it to intimidate opponents just as often as they use it to actually kill. Orcish gladiators often enter the arena whirling their hand-axe-with-chain above their heads like a lasso to stir up the crowd. While holding a bologorash’s chain in one hand, you can retract the axe as your free Use an Object action each turn. Also, you cannot be disarmed while holding both the axe and the chain in separate hands. Buying and attaching a new length of chain costs 2 gp.

  • Coiling Python. As an action, make a single ranged weapon attack with your bologorash against a Large or smaller target within range. On a hit, you deal normal damage, and the creature must make a Strength saving throw, becoming grappled on a failed save. While grappled in this way, a creature can attempt a DC 17 Strength (Athletics) check to break the chains, ending the grapple and turning the bologorash into a normal hand axe.
  • Screaming Vulture. As an action, you can whirl the bologorash above your head to cause it to make an eerie “howling” noise that can terrify nearby creatures. Each creature of your choice within 30 feet that can hear you must make a Wisdom saving throw, becoming frightened of you for 1 round on a failed save. Creatures with an Intelligence of 5 or lower have disadvantage on this saving throw, and creatures that can see you have advantage on this save.
Gorgash

Orcs believe in a philosophy of “bigger is better,” consequences be damned. This philosophy is in full display in the mighty gorgash, which is literally translated to “blood-shower blade” in Common, though most simply call it the “double-axe.” This brutal weapon is little more than two battleaxes joined at the haft: two double-edged axe heads connected by a 6-foot-long haft. Because of their unusual size and balance, gorgash are typically used as dueling weapons and are only taken onto the battlefield by the most theatrical or overconfident of warlords.

  • Two-Headed Serpent. When you take the Attack action while wielding a gorgash, you may make one additional attack as a bonus action, using the “opposite” head of the axe. You do not add your Strength modifier to the damage of this attack unless you have the Two-Weapon Fighting fighting style.
  • Charging Boar. If you move at least 20 feet straight toward a target, you can make a single attack with your gorgash as an action. If you hit, you deal damage as normal, and the target must make a Strength saving throw or fall prone.
  • Furious Hydra. As an action, make an attack roll with your gorgash against all adjacent creatures, resolving a single attack roll against each creature’s AC individually. On a hit, roll 2d8 and add your Strength modifier and any other bonuses to damage you benefit from. Divide the damage equally between all targets.