Forge Engine SRD

Forge Engine Universal Role-Playing System Copyright 2019 Justin Halliday ” Some Rights Reserved The text of Forge Engine ” Universal Role-Playing System by Justin Halliday is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ Forge Engine and Hero Forge Games are trademarks of Justin Halliday Printing Authorization: This PDF document may be printed for personal use. Version 1.1 (Build 489)

Contents

Change Log

  • 489: Errata, fixed Dazzling Word effects, added PD penalties to Dazed and Stunned
  • 488: Updated to v1.1 for PDF and POD versions
  • 487: Aligned finesse weapons across Historical, Modern and Sci-Fi
  • 486: Included Explosions in Environmental Hazards, and refined Short Rests
  • 485: Revised Venomous trait to include Stamina test to end Poisoned condition
  • 484: Added heavy handgun/blaster weapons with ?/? cost
  • 483: Revised Armor Training specialized martial skill and armor equipment
  • 482: Revised Shield Training specialized martial skill and shield ratings

Contributors

  • Interior art by James Shields
  • Cover art by Simon Lissaman
  • Forge Engine logo by Lincoln Flynn
  • Aver font by Lauren Thompson

Special thanks to these playtesters for support, feedback, and adventures:

  • Mal Woods
  • Mark Heath
  • Matthew Pohlen
  • Scott Horsley
  • Chris Jacobs
  • Michael Garde
  • James Hamilton
  • Scott Collumbine
  • Matt Lindus
  • Luc Le Quiniat
  • Jules Le Quiniat
  • Stuart Donaldson
  • Greg Buresch
  • Sue Mcarthur
  • Jade Ross
  • Drew Pass
  • Rob Sturtz

Foreword

There are lots of role-playing systems that do lots of things really well. And yet, there are still some things that no systems do really well. For players, Forge Engine does one thing really well. Forge Engine gives you, the player, complete control of every aspect of your character and your character’s actions. For game masters, Forge Engine allows you to use the same system and content for historical, fantasy, modern, and sci-fi campaigns, and even those that combine all four. That is all.

Introduction

When modern soldiers are transported to ancient Rome, law enforcement officers fight inter-dimensional intruders, post-collapse humans scavenge for alien technologies, or heroic warriors and wizards battle monstrous evil, Forge Engine is there to quickly and seamlessly support your stories. The Forge Engine universal RPG system puts full control of your character and your game into your hands. The system supports fantasy, sci-fi, historical, and modern settings, and delivers tactical play while remaining streamlined and fast. Forge Engine’s innovative energy system lets you channel your combat effort. You can make multiple attacks, hold energy to boost your defenses, move into better position, or make your attacks even stronger. Forge Engine has the following features:

  • Attribute and skill system gives players freedom to build their characters
  • Support for medieval fantasy, historical, modern, and sci-fi play
  • Opposed d10 dice pools for attacks with degrees of success
  • Attribute tests against static difficulty numbers for simplicity
  • Energy system gives players control of number and strength of characters’ actions
  • Increased power gives larger dice pools with higher chance of multiple successes
  • Combat rolls combine attribute, skill, weapon, evasion, and armor in one step
  • Tactical combat system with meaningful decisions in critical situations
  • Concurrent combat turns allow fluid and dynamic battles

What’s in this Book?

Core Rules

The first section covers the core principles of the Forge Engine, then character creation and development, and then rules for skills and attribute tests, adventuring, and combat.

Game Content

The Forge Engine character content is collected in the game content section. This stand-alone section includes all the content that players need to create, develop, and run their characters: traits, general skills, martial skills, magic skills, and equipment.

Game Mastering

The final section of this book includes instruction for game mastering Forge Engine games, advice for creating custom Forge Engine content, and adversary templates.

Fundamentals

This section covers the fundamental elements of the Forge Engine system.

Diamonds

Forge Engine uses diamonds ” ? ” to represent dice, attribute and skill ratings, energy, action and defense pools, and equipment costs and ratings. For brevity, diamonds are abbreviated: ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? «? «? «?, etc.

Dice

The Forge Engine uses d10 dice for attacks, defenses, and attribute tests. Each die is numbered from 1 to 10 (if your dice have 0, then this is counted as 10, not 0).

Ratings

Attributes, skills, and equipment have ratings, represented with ?. Low ratings are cheap or easy to acquire, while higher ratings require significant investment.

Attributes

Attributes represent a character’s underlying physical and mental capabilities:

  • Physical attributes: Strength, Agility, and Stamina (STR, AGI, STA)
  • Mental attributes: Influence, Intelligence, and Acuity (INF, INT, ACU)

Attributes have a minimum rating of ? and increase to ????? or more. A character’s attribute ratings are initially determined by spending character points at character creation and then developed during the course of a game.

You can find more about Attributes on page 15.

Traits

Traits are the inherent capabilities of characters that fall outside of the normal six attributes and aren’t learnable skills. For example, traits include unusual types of vision (low-light), abnormal hearing (acute hearing), additional senses (tremor sense), different physical shapes and sizes. Additionally, each school of magic requires a trait before learning that school’s spells.

You can find more about Traits on page 16.

Skills

Skills are expertise that characters can learn and practice over time. Most skills are related to an underlying attribute, and those skills cannot be higher than that attribute. As with attributes, skills are first purchased with character points at character creation and then developed in the course of a game. Characters can also learn new skills during play by spending character points. The number of skills a character can develop is only limited by their character points. By default, characters are untrained in all skills, and simply rely on their attributes. Skills all have ratings from ? (novice) to ????? (master) and higher.

You can find more about Skills on page 17.

Energy Pool

Characters have an energy pool that reflects how much effort they can use in a short period of time, such as in combat. This is their capacity for action. Energy is expressed in diamonds ?, which are often the equivalent of dice. Each character’s maximum energy is equal to the ratings of their three highest attributes. This gives a range for the maximum energy of ? to «? or higher. Physically and mentally taxing actions use energy. In strenuous situations, the effort required for a character’s actions is ‘paid’ for from the energy pool. This energy is all replenished from round to round.

You can find more about Energy on page 18.

Variable Energy Costs

Simple physical actions, like moving 5’ or using an object, use just ? energy. More strenuous actions (like physical or magic attacks) allow the player to choose how much energy they can add to their action pools. By adding more energy, characters have a larger chance of success, but energy is depleted and regained from round to round, so high-energy actions can leave characters unable to react to their enemies’ actions and attacks.

Using Energy

When an action or reaction includes instructions to use energy, it is underlined. When characters take actions, they spend energy (keyword: spend) to pay costs, add energy (keyword: add) to their action or defense pools for extra effort, or expend energy (keyword: expend) for extraordinary actions.

  • Spend: Spent energy represents the initial effort that is required to start the action (attack, defense, or spell). Spent energy is set aside instead of going into a pool.
  • Add: Added energy is the variable additional effort that the character can employ to make the action stronger. This energy goes into a dice pool.
  • Expend: Energy that is expended is extraordinary effort that is used in the action and cannot be recovered until the character rests.

Spent or added energy is all regained at the start of each round. Expended energy is set aside until the character rests, and is not regained at the start of each round.

Action Pools

Action pools are dynamic dice pools that are built when a character performs an action, such as an attribute test, an attack, or a spell. The size of the action pool is based on the character’s attributes, skills, equipment, and the amount of energy that is used, and follows the S.A.G.E. mnemonic below. As the SAGE steps are followed, the pool is built. At each stage of the process, dice are added or removed from the pool.

You can find more about using action pools for Attacks on page 22, or for Attribute Tests on page 24.

Defense Pools

Characters have defense pools that are used when they are targeted with attacks. Again, the number of dice in the defense pool is based on the character’s attributes, skills, equipment, and available energy, and uses the same SAGE mnemonic (below). Defense pools reflect the character’s ability to resist physical or mental attacks. Both the physical defense (PD) and mental defense (MD) pools can be improved by skills and equipment that give flat bonuses or allow characters to add dice to those pools.

You can find more about Defenses on page 23.

Physical Defense

A character’s physical defense (PD) begins at ?, and then armor and other bonuses are added. The PD pool is augmented through reactions like Dodge, and skills such as Brace and Shield Training. Finally, modifiers from externalities, like cover, are applied.

Mental Defense

The character’s mental defense (MD) is based on the middle value of their Intelligence, Acuity, or Influence attributes. Additional dice can be added to the MD pool through skills like Iron Will and Empty Vessel.

Constructing Action and Defense Pools

The S.A.G.E. (spend, add, gain, externalities) mnemonic is used for constructing both action and defense pools:

  • Spend or Expend the energy cost of the action, reaction, or equipment and gain the equipment’s rating as bonus dice into the character’s action or defense pool.
  • Add extra energy up to the relevant attribute rating into the action or defense pool.
  • Gain bonus dice from the relevant skills into the character’s action or defense pool.
  • Externalities adjust the pool based on any external factors (e.g. positioning and conditions for action pools, and range, visibility, and obstructions for defense pools). Advantageous externalities add dice to the action and defense pools, while disadvantageous externalities remove dice from the pools.

Dice Pools

In Forge Engine games, these pools are used to determine the outcome of character’s actions. There are two types of tests:

  • Opposed pools: Used when an action is opposed by another character. In this situation, the action pool and defense pool are rolled against each other.
  • Fixed challenges: Used when an action needs to overcome a static difficulty. Here, the action pool is rolled against a static difficulty target.

Opposed Pools

In normal combat and magic the action pool and defense pool are rolled as opposed pools. Both the attacker and the defender roll their pools against each other: action pool versus defense pool. The attacker gains a success (or hit) for each of their dice that is equal to or higher than the defender’s single highest dice. Action Pool Defense Pool Successes [3] [3] [6] [7] [9] [9] [10] [1] [6] [9] 3 [8] [9] [9] [9] [1] [10] None (miss) [9] [9] 1 [10] [6] [7] [10] 1 [1] [2] [2] [3] [3] Critical fail (optional rule)

In combat, each success translates directly into 1 damage. In an opposed attribute test, multiple successes mean the character achieved the task better or more quickly.

Fixed Challenges

In attempting actions against fixed challenges, such as climbing a rope, balancing, or deciphering a code, the player rolls their character’s action pool against a set difficulty target, which is usually between 7 and 10. Once again, the character gains a success for each of their dice that is equal to or higher than the difficulty target. Action Pool Difficulty Target Successes [3] [4] [7] None [1] [8] [9] [9] [8] 3 [7] [7] [8] [9] None [10] [10] 1 [1] [1] [6] [7] [8] Critical fail (optional rule)

For each of these successes, the character achieved the task better or more quickly.

Equipment

Equipment is the physical weapons, armor, and implements through which characters channel their attributes, skills, and effort.

Items

The simplest category of equipment is items. These have endless variety, and may give bonuses to attribute tests or improve other actions.

Armor

Armor provides bonus dice to the character’s PD. However, armor can impose penalties if the character doesn’t have the required skills.

Weapons

Weapons have a cost and a rating. The equipment’s cost represents the effort required to use the equipment (such as a pistol that requires minimal effort, compared to a heavy sword), while the equipment’s rating represents the force that it imparts when used. Weak weapons have ratings of ?, ?, or ??, while powerful weapons (sniper rifles or crossbows) have ratings higher than ?????. With this in mind, the equipment’s cost is the energy that must be spent to use it, and its rating is the number of dice that go into the action pool for the attack. Equipment costs and ratings are represented with diamonds: ?. A simple club is represented like this, ???/??, and abbreviated like this: ?/?. For example, our club costs ? and has a rating of ?, while a massive two-handed greatsword has a cost of ? and rating of ?. This ratio between the cost of the equipment’s use and the number of dice that it grants reflects the weapon’s effectiveness. While powerful weapons are inherently effective, lightweight weapons allow characters to use their energy to add extra effort, which rewards them with bonus dice from their skills. For best effect, combine an effective weapon with a high-rating skill.

Health

A character’s maximum health is derived from their physical size (tiny, small, normal, large, huge, and gargantuan), their Stamina, and any other relevant traits. Maximum health ranges from 5 to 13 for a normal human.

Character Points

Character points (CP) are the currency of character development; they are used in character creation and later earned through play and spent on improving attributes and skills, and to learn new skills. The player can choose when and how to spend CP to improve their character.

You can find more about Character Creation on page 8 and Character Development on page 14.

Character Creation

Making Your Character

Your first step in playing a Forge Engine game is to create your character. When creating a character, you first determine the character concept, and then build out the character’s three main aspects:

  • Traits
  • Attributes
  • Skills

And then you go on to determine the character’s extra details:

  • Energy
  • Defense Pools
  • Health
  • Movement Speed
  • Starting Equipment

Finally, you can bring your character to life by developing their unique aspects, including their personality, background, moral code, and life goals.

Character Creation Steps

Character creation follows these steps:

  • Step 1: Character Concept
  • Step 2: Traits
  • Step 3: Attributes
  • Step 4: Skills
  • Step 5: Energy Pool
  • Step 6: Defense Pools
  • Step 7: Health
  • Step 8: Movement Speed
  • Step 9: Starting Equipment
  • Step 10: Final Details

Most character aspects are purchased with character points (CP), split between:

  • Attributes and traits: 15 CP
  • Skills: 30 CP

The GM can increase or decrease the CP budget for these areas, restrict trait choices, or limit the maximum rating of attributes. Furthermore, the GM can allow unspent attribute and trait CP to be spent on skills or held over into play.

Step 1: Character Concept Before diving in to the mechanical aspects of your character, it is important to have an idea of the sort of character you wish to play and how that character fits in with your adventuring group and the game world where they exist.

A little forethought and planning here will save you the embarrassment of showing up to a post-apocalyptic wasteland with your halfling tinker.

Step 2: Traits Rule: Traits are bought with CP.

Rule: CP are shared between attributes and traits.

Rule: Traits are usually only chosen at character creation.

Rule: All characters start with a species trait.

Traits are purchased with character points shared with the character’s attribute ratings:

  • Characters have 15 CP shared between traits and attributes

Each trait has a CP cost, which reflects the relative value of the trait. Highly beneficial traits have higher costs, while comparative mundane traits have lower CP costs. The GM can also include or exclude any traits that don’t fit in the game’s setting. By default, characters have the Human species, which means they have the Medium size trait and a free trait from this list: Muscular, Lithe, Fit, Sensitive, Incisive, or Astute. If the game’s setting supports varying character species, like elves, orcs, and dwarves, these are selected as traits. The selected species then includes traits that reflect that species’ unique characteristics.

A description of the types of traits is included on page 16 and full list of traits is in the Traits section on page 48.

Step 3: Attributes Rule: All characters have six attributes with a starting rating of ?.

Rule: Attributes are determined by spending CP.

Rule: Each attribute rating increase costs CP equal to the rating.

Rule: Each attribute rating increase is purchased separately.

Rule: CP are shared between attributes and traits.

Rule: The GM sets the CP budget for a character’s attributes and traits.

Attribute ratings are purchased with character points shared with the character’s traits:

  • Characters have 15 CP shared between traits and attributes

Characters begin with ? in each attribute, and rating increases are purchased with CP. Each attribute increase costs CP equal to the rating that is being purchased; so increasing an attribute from ? to ?? costs 2 CP and increasing an attribute from ???? to ????? costs 5 CP. These increases are purchased separately, so increasing an attribute from ? to ????? costs 14 CP (2+3+4+5). Note that most species traits come bundled with traits that affect the cost of attribute increases. For example, the Human species trait allows the player to select a trait that reduces the improvement cost of one of the character’s six attributes.

The full description of each attribute is in the Attributes section on page 15.

Step 4: Skills Rule: Skills are purchased and increased by spending CP.

Rule: Each skill rating increase (or new skill) costs 1 CP.

Rule: The GM sets the number of CP for a starting character’s skills.

Rule: Skills cannot have ratings higher than the underlying attribute.

Rule: There is no limit in the number of skills that characters can train.

Rule: The GM may limit the maximum rating for each skill.

The first ? for a new skill costs 1 CP, and each subsequent skill rating also costs 1 CP.

  • Characters have 30 CP to spend on skills
  • At least 15 CP must be spent on General skills

Furthermore, characters are assumed to know their own language and have basic common knowledge without spending CP:

  • Characters have Knowledge (Language: Native) equal to their Intelligence rating
  • Characters have Knowledge (Common) equal to their Intelligence rating

At their discretion, GMs can adjust the characters’ CP budget for skills, they can further separate the CP budget between general, martial, specialized, and magic skills, and they can set a maximum rating for the purchased skills. As with attributes, the GM can allow unspent CP to be held over into play.

General skills are listed in the General Skills section on page 58, martial skills are listed in the Martial Skills section on page 64 and the Basic Martial Skills ” Modern section on page 66, and magic skills are listed in the Magic Skills section on page 76.

Step 5: Energy Rule: Maximum energy is the sum of the character’s three highest attributes.

The character’s maximum energy is calculated by adding up the ratings of the character’s three highest attributes. If the character is created with the standard budgets, then they will likely have 8 energy. A low power character (or a character with a lot of traits) could have 6 or 7 energy while a character that is developed through campaign play ” or a powerful game character ” could have 15 or more energy.

Step 6: Defense Pools Rule: Physical defense (PD) pool is ? + equipment.

Rule: Mental defense (MD) pool is the middle rating of Influence, Intelligence, or Acuity.

The character’s defense pools are:

  • PD: ? plus equipment (such as worn armor) plus any optional skills
  • MD: Middle rating of Influence, Intelligence, or Acuity, plus any optional skills

The defense pools can be augmented by reactions like Dodge (which requires energy) or with optional skills that the player has bought for their character; such as Iron Will to increase their mental defense.

Step 7: Health Rule: Maximum health is based on the character’s size trait and Stamina attribute.

The character’s maximum health is based on their Stamina and their size trait, which is normally bundled with their species. For example, the Human trait means a character is Medium size. Other traits and species choices affect the character’s maximum health.

Size Maximum Health

Small 2 + twice Stamina Medium 3 + twice Stamina Large 5 + twice Stamina

More character sizes are listed in the Size Traits section.

Step 9: Equipment: The GM may determine starting equipment a character has, and whether he or she has money to spend on additional items.

Equipment lists are included in the Equipment sections, starting on page 85. Step 10: Final Details The finishing touches for a character are to work out what makes them tick, where they’re from, what they’ve experienced, and what drives them:

  • Personality
  • Background
  • Moral code
  • Life goals

NEW PAGE Character Sheets

The Forge Engine character sheet has sections for:

  • Player and character details
  • Earned (or unspent) character points
  • Attributes, traits, general skills
  • Martial/magic skills (including space for descriptions), and equipment
  • Energy pool (maximum and expended)
  • Defense pools (physical and mental)
  • Health (maximum and current)

Character Build Samples

Wasteland Scavenger Human The Wasteland Scavenger scours the blasted wastes looking for items to use or trade. The wastelands are dangerous, even for the strongest and most cunning. But this scavenger has faced most of its natural hazards, not that anything in the wastes is natural any more. The true dangers are the roaming bands of humans and mutes who prey on anyone weaker than themselves. To these monsters, a man’s only worth is at the trigger of a gun, the clothes on his back, the food in his pack, and the weapons on his hip. Without these, he is a burden and a risk. The lucky ones are left alive, the unlucky ones are served for dinner. Strength: ? Agility: ? Stamina: ? Influence: ? Intelligence: ? Acuity: ? Energy: ? Health: 7 PD: ??? MD: ?? Long Guns (AGI): ??? Initiative (AGI): ??? Melee Weapons (STR): ?? Perception (ACU): ?? Armor Training (STR): ?? Language (Native) (INT): ?? ? Machete ?/? slashing, Melee Weapons, max attack ?/? ? .308 rifle ?/? piercing, 10-50’, Long Guns, max attack ?/? Precision Shot: ??? Specialized Martial Skill (Action) Spend energy up to your Precision Shot rating, your next martial attack gains ? bonus die for each spent energy. You do not gain these bonus dice if you are the target of an attack or if you use another action or reaction before you make the attack. Human: Medium (Size 5-6’, Move 30’, Health 3 + twice Stamina, Reach 5’), Lithe Radiation Resistant: Damage you take from radiation is halved (round up) Machete .308 rifle Body armor (?? PD) .308 bullets (8) Dog food (4 cans) Water (3.8l)

Note, these example characters do not use the full CP budget of starting characters.

Gunslinger Human Across the open prairies, in unincorporated territories, and in bustling frontier towns, fortunes are made and lost, reputations are forged by good deeds or ill, and lives are saved or spent at the barrel of a gun. The chaotic years of the newcomers’ rapid expansion to the west of North America are a time of great opportunity, and of great tragedy. The rule of law is slow to catch up with the great crushing wave of progress. Whether motivated by greed or virtue, some manage to impose order in the midst of the maelstrom. Lawful stewardship creates islands of order where thriving towns and societies grow. Greedy and selfish leaders hold nascent communities hostage, ruling by the threat of violence. Strength: ? Agility: ? Stamina: ? Influence: ? Intelligence: ? Acuity: ? Energy: ? Health: 7 PD: ? MD: ?? Hand Guns: ??? Persuasion: ??? Brawling: ?? Initiative: ?? Survival: ? Language (Native): ?? ? Punch ?/? bludgeoning, Brawling, max attack ?/? ? Colt agent .38 ?/? piercing, 10-30’, Hand Guns, max attack ?/? First Strike: ??? Specialized Martial Skill (Bonus) When you are the first to deal damage in a combat encounter, the attack deals additional damage. Your attack deals 1 extra damage for each damage dealt, up to your First Strike rating. Surprise Attack: ?? Specialized Martial Skill (Bonus) When you start an encounter without a wielded weapon, the first martial attack you make gains ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Surprise Attack rating. Human: Medium (Size 5-6’, Move 30’, Health 3 + twice Stamina, Reach 5’), Sensitive .308 bullets (8) .38 bullets (15) Colt agent .38 Skirmisher Cyborg Later, she learned that it was six months. But to Verona, it seemed like an eternity of nightmarishly real dreams. When she finally woke, the nightmares continued. From the doctors, she learned that she’d taken a direct hit from an ion grenade. Her weavesuit had saved her life, what was left of it. Even with the suit, most of her body was broken beyond repair. Luckily, the doctors were able to salvage her brain and nervous system. From the company, she learned that the medical help and the new body added five more years to her contract. Five more years trapped in this metal shell. Five more years killing for the company. Five more years before Verona would be free of the company, and could even start saving for a real body. Strength: ? Agility: ? Stamina: ? Influence: ? Intelligence: ? Acuity: ? Energy: ? Health: 7 PD: ??? MD: ? Finesse Weapons: ??? Initiative: ?? Language (Trade): ?? Language (Native): ?? Knowledge (Hacking): ? Investigation: ?? ? Claws ?/? piercing, Finesse Weapons, max attack ?/? Surprise Attack: ?? Specialized Martial Skill (Bonus) When you start an encounter without a wielded weapon, the first martial attack you make gains ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Surprise Attack rating. Twist The Blade: ?? Specialized Martial Skill (Reaction) When you make a melee attack and the dice have been rolled, you can spend ? and then add energy to your action pool, up to your Twist The Blade rating. These additional dice are rolled immediately. Cyborg: Medium Size 5-6’ (Move 30’, Health 3 + twice Stamina, Reach 5’), Carapace, Lean, Insensitive Claws: You can make an unarmed melee attack with your claws for ??/??.

Firefly Tengu Greedy opportunists venture into the soaring reaches of the Druinhowe mountains in search of ancient treasures. Perhaps they ignore the warnings of the common folk in the lower villages. And in their climb, perhaps they missed the shattered boulders and bleached bones. As the weather closes in, they miss the shadows that flash through the roiling clouds. In their single-mindedness, in their haste, in their obliviousness, in their greed, they condemn themselves. With a screech, the tengu fireflies erupt from the clouds, dropping cannonball sized rocks, blasting flaming bolts, and raining razor-sharp arrows. Strength: ? Agility: ? Stamina: ? Influence: ? Intelligence: ? Acuity: ? Energy: ? Health: 5 PD: ?? MD: ? Ranged Weapons: ?? Initiative: ?? Armor Training: ? Language (Native): ?? ? Longbow ?/? piercing, 10-300’, Ranged Weapons, max attack ?/? Pinning Attack: ?? Specialized Martial Skill (Action) When you declare a melee or ranged attack, you can choose to have the attack hamper the target’s movement instead of dealing damage. If you achieve 1 or 2 successes, the target is Slowed (they must spend ? extra energy for each segment of movement). If you achieve 3 or more successes, the target is Immobilized (they cannot intentionally move, but you can be pushed or pulled). The maximum number of successes is your Pinning Attack rating. The target must use Shake It Off to remove the effect. Fiery Bolt: ?? Arcane Magic Intelligence Skill (Action) Add energy to your action pool up to your Intelligence rating and gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Fiery Bolt rating. Make a fire ranged attack (action pool vs PD) at a target within 25’. The attack deals half damage. Tengu: Medium Size 5-6’ (Move 30’, Health 3 + twice Stamina, Reach 5’), Lean. Obtuse, Flyer Pyromancy Casting: You can train Pyromancy Magic and Cantrip Magic skills. Longbow (?/?) Flightcloak armor (?) Arrows

Hospiter Human Aged just 3, Lex Hammerfist was found in the ruined remains of her tribe’s village. Wailing amidst the brutalized remains of her kinfolk, she was inexplicitly unharmed, although she bore fresh-healed scars of horrific wounds. Without a name, the child was taken as a ward by the sacred Order of the Knights Hospiter. The members of the order are recruited and trained for their unique blend of martial prowess and healing magic. These powerful knights pledge themselves to the protection of the sick and poor, those who cannot protect themselves. With years of toil and training behind her, Lex leaves the confines of the order’s cloister, to seek her revenge. Strength: ? Agility: ? Stamina: ? Influence: ? Intelligence: ? Acuity: ? Energy: ? Health: 7 PD: ??? MD: ?? Melee Weapons: ??? Initiative: ? Armor Training: ?? Language (Native): ?? ? Warhammer ?/? bludgeoning, Melee Weapons, max attack ?/«? Engaged Attack: ??? Specialized Martial Skill (Bonus) When you make a martial attack at a target within the reach of an ally, you gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Engaged Attack rating. Healing Touch: ??? Animist Magic Acuity Skill (Action) Expend ?, then add energy to your action pool up to your Acuity rating and gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Healing Touch rating. Assign all of the dice to yourself or an adjacent ally. The target recovers 1 heath for each allocated die. Human: Medium Size 5-6’ (Move 30’, Health 3 + twice Stamina, Reach 5’), Muscular Animist Casting: You can train Animist Magic skills and Cantrip Magic skills. Warhammer (?/?) Chainmail Armor (??) Knights Hospiter symbol

Field Agent Human Lina Alvarez had always prided herself on her ability to work hard and overcome any challenge in her way. Through high school and college she worked long and hard, and got the scores she needed to qualify for recruitment into the bureau. After training at the FBI academy at Quantico, Lina’s first placement as an agent was a field office in El Paso. With two years of chasing down fraud and tax evasion cases, Lina’s just scored her first big case; the disappearance of a group of teenagers in a dusty border town. She arrives in a black town car, armed only with her pistol and her first lead. Now she’s a dame in black. Strength: ? Agility: ? Stamina: ? Influence: ? Intelligence: ? Acuity: ? Energy: ? Health: 7 PD: ?? MD: ??? Hand Guns: ?? Initiative: ? Armor Training: ?? Language (Native): ??? ? Glock 17 9mm ?/? piercing, 10-30’, Hand Guns, max attack ?/? Leader’s Pledge: ??? Specialized Martial Skill (Action) When an ally within 25’ can perceive you, you can spend energy equal to your Influence, up to your Leader’s Pledge rating. That ally gains ? bonus energy for each energy spent. This bonus energy lasts until the end of the target’s next turn. Sidestep: ?? Specialized Martial Skill (Reaction) When you are the target of an attack against your PD and the dice have been rolled, you can spend ? and then add energy to your PD pool, up to your Sidestep rating. These additional dice are rolled immediately. Human: Medium Size 5-6’ (Move 30’, Health 3 + twice Stamina, Reach 5’), Astute Glock 17 9mm (?/?) Kevlar vest (?) Sunglasses

Character Development Rule: Attribute and skill ratings can be increased after character creation.

Rule: Traits can be bought after character creation if allowed by the GM.

Rule: The GM can specify when players can spend Character Points.

Characters earn character points through play, and can spend these points on attribute ratings, traits, and skill ratings

As in character creation (detailed on page 8), the cost of increasing an attribute rating is progressively more expensive, each skill rating increase has the same cost, and the acquisition of a new trait is based on the fixed cost of the trait. The GM can specify when players can spend their character’s character points. For example, the GM could allow CP to be spent at a short or long rest, or at the end or start of a session. Furthermore, the GM may also make other requirements, such as only allowing a skill to be increased (or acquired) if the character has used it.

Increasing Attribute Ratings Rule: Each attribute rating increase costs CP equal to the rating.

Rule: Changes to attribute ratings can affect maximum health or maximum energy.

Each attribute rating increase costs CP equal to the rating that is being bought; so increasing an attribute from ? to ?? costs 2 CP and increasing an attribute from ???? to ????? costs 5 CP. When attribute ratings increase, the player will also need to review and update any of their character’s derived characteristics, such as health or their energy pool.

Buying New Traits Rule: The GM may allow characters to acquire new traits during play.

Rule: The GM may allow or limit the acquisition of any specific trait.

Rule: If allowed, each new trait is acquired by paying its normal cost.

Because traits usually reflect the inherent characteristics of a character (such as their size or senses), they cannot normally be acquired after character creation. However, the GM has the ability to allow or limit the acquisition of any new traits. For example, the GM may allow new traits to be acquired through exposure to a powerful mutagen or may allow characters to acquire magic traits at any time. When a new trait is bought, the cost is that trait’s normal cost.

Increasing Skill Ratings Rule: Each skill rating increase or new skill costs 1 CP.

The first and each subsequent skill rating costs 1 CP. As previously mentioned, the GM may decide that players can only increase their character’s skills or acquire a new skill if that character has used (or tried to use) the skill, or found appropriate training.

Attributes

Characters have three physical attributes and three mental attributes.

Strength

Strength is the physical strength and conditioning of the character.

????? Weak ????? Natural ????? Sturdy ????? Robust ????? Tough

Agility

Agility is the character’s ability to move quickly and control their body with precision.

????? Clumsy ????? Average ????? Deft ????? Agile ????? Precise

Stamina

Stamina is the character’s physical resilience, including their ability to withstand trauma and their endurance.

????? Sickly ????? Healthy ????? Fit ????? Robust ????? Vigorous

Influence

Influence is the character’s appearance, communication skills, and their ability to influence the actions of others.

????? Curt ????? Typical ????? Convincing ????? Persuasive ????? Powerful

Intelligence

Intelligence is the character’s ability to think and reason, as well as their control over arcane forces.

????? Slow ????? Common ????? Quick ????? Astute ????? Incisive

Acuity

Acuity is a character’s awareness, intuition, and their spiritual connection to the world of the divine.

????? Rash ????? Usual ????? Prudent ????? Perceptive ????? Wise

Traits Rule: Traits are inherent aspects of characters.

Rule: Traits give characters abilities, bonuses, or penalties in specific areas.

Traits are inherent aspects of a character that are outside of the normal human ideal: two legs, two arms, 5-6’ tall, two eyes, two ears, constrained by the laws of the physical world, all of the usual stuff. Traits, as distinct from skills, cannot be learned or developed through effort, they are inherent to the character. Through some misfortune or misadventure however, a character might acquire a new trait during play; perhaps losing an arm or an eye in a duel, or falling into a radioactive pool and becoming inordinately sensitive to others’ thoughts. Additionally, if the game’s setting includes magic, characters can purchase magic traits after character creation to expand their repertoire of magic schools.

Traits can be beneficial or detrimental, and their impact on a character can be minor or significant. These factors determine the character point cost of the trait, whether it is cheap or expensive and ” for detrimental traits ” whether it gives the player extra CP to spend on the character. Traits are categorized:

  • Species
  • Size
  • Attributes
  • Magic
  • Movement
  • Mental
  • Physical
  • Sensory
  • Damage

Species

Species traits gather collections of traits into bundles that reflect the differences between different species, be they normal humans, fantasy races like elves and dwarves, or more peculiar alien species. These bundles always include the size of the character, and then may include attribute traits (such as robust dwarves or lithe elves) and any other characteristics common to the species.

Size

Size traits reflect different sizes of characters, relative to a normal 5-6’ human; are they tiny like a cat, gigantic like an elephant, or even bigger?

Attributes

Attribute traits represent the propensity that characters have towards specific attributes. For example, traditional fantasy dwarves are characterized by their robust physique. Others species, such as fantasy elves, are graceful and lithe.

Damage

Damage resistance traits apply to characters that are resilient to specific types of damage. Damage immunity traits are absolute versions of resistances, protecting characters from all damage of a specific type. For example, a character with a hardened carapace might be resistant to piercing damage, a rad-scorpion. One example of damage immunity is humans, who are immune to electro-magnetic pulses (while robots and electronics are vulnerable to this damage).

Magic

Magic traits encompass abilities that are outside of our normal ‘natural’ world, whether they are magic, supernatural, psychic, telekinesis, ESP, or even augury. These traits allow characters to train skills from specific magic schools. If supported by the setting, magic traits can be purchased after character creation.

Mental

Mental traits cover cognitive abilities that are not magic and are not sensory.

Movement

Movement traits include forms of movement other than locomotion; burrowing, flying, climbing, teleporting, phasing, slithering, jumping, swimming, even immaterial.

Physical

Physical traits define areas of the character’s physical body. Perhaps the character has extra arms or legs (or some variation in these areas) or is abnormally healthy or sickly.

Sensory

Sensory traits cover the ways that characters absorb input from the world around them. Perhaps they only have monocular vision, or asymmetrical ears to aid depth perception, or heightened sense of smell, or sensitivity to a wider range of the light spectrum.

Skills Rule: General skills give bonus dice to attribute tests.

Rule: Martial skills give bonus dice to combat actions and reactions.

Rule: Martial action skills give characters additional combat actions.

Rule: Martial reaction skills give characters additional combat reactions.

Rule: Spell action skills give characters additional spell actions.

Rule: Spell reaction skills give characters additional spell reactions.

Rule: The number of bonus dice gained from a skill cannot be higher than the rating of the underlying attribute.

Skills are character abilities that can be learned and developed through effort and application. Skills have ratings from ? to ????? (or higher), and the benefits of skills can only be gained when characters have invested CP in the skill. Mechanically, skills come into play in a number of ways:

  • Attribute test bonuses
  • Martial skill bonuses
  • Combat actions and reactions
  • Magic spell actions and reactions

General Skills

General skills allow characters to gain bonus dice when making attribute tests where the skill applies. The skill’s rating is the number of bonus dice that you gain. However, the character cannot gain more dice from the skill than the underlying attribute rating. For example, having a Perception rating of ?? gives two bonus dice when making an Acuity (Perception) test to detect a hidden hazard or enemy. That hidden enemy, by the way, is opposing with its Agility and Stealth (with a rating of ????) to avoid being spotted. Alternatively, a Seduction rating of ? gives one bonus die when making an Influence (Seduction) test to ply charms on a lady who is betrothed to a rival. That lady can oppose with her Influence, and perhaps combine that with her Persuasion skill (with a rating of ??). There are a limited number of skills and a huge number of situations where they can be applied, so creative (but reasonable) application of a character’s skills is encouraged. Example: Jager Broadbough crouches in the crook of a large and gnarled tree, waiting for the small raiding party to pass beneath his hide. Jager has Agility of ????, and is highly trained in Stealth, with ????. Jager also wears a camouflage cloak, and is hiding amongst thick foliage. These externalities each give Jager ?? extra dice for an Agility (Stealth) test, giving a total die pool of «?.

Basic Martial Skills

Basic martial skills give benefits in specific situations or when using equipment. They usually hook into the standard combat actions and give bonuses to those actions:

  • The Melee Weapons skill gives bonus dice when adding energy to a melee attack using an appropriate melee weapon.
  • The Finesse Weapons skill gives bonus dice when adding energy to a melee attack using an appropriate finesse weapon.
  • The Long Guns skill gives bonus dice when making a ranged attack with an appropriate firearm, such as a shotgun, rifle, or assault rifle.

Other basic martial skills give additional actions or allow the effective use of armor:

  • Armor Training allows characters to use armor without it impairing their actions.
  • Shield Training skill allows a character to effectively use their shield.

Specialized Martial Skills

Specialized martial action skills give circumstantial bonuses and allow characters to perform new actions in combat, while specialized martial reaction skills allow characters to perform reactions when triggered by specific events:

  • Engaged Attack allows characters to gain bonus dice to attacks when the character’s allies threaten the target.
  • Retaliation grants bonus energy when the character takes damage.
  • Twist The Blade gives the character the opportunity to spend additional energy to deal extra damage when their attack hits its target.
  • Enraged Attacker allows the character to enter a raging stance where all of their attacks gain bonus dice.
  • Last Gasp allows the character to expend energy to gain bonus energy.

Magic Skills

Magic actions and reactions are only available when the character has the relevant magic casting trait and has trained additional spell actions or reactions. A character with the Divine Casting trait and the Divine Protection skill can use an action to create a pool of dice that they can use to defend against subsequent attacks. In another example, that same character may also have the Retributive Strike skill, and can use a reaction to lash out at an enemy when they are attacked.

Pre-Requisite Traits

Some skills, including all spell skills, have underlying traits that characters must have before they can spend CP on the skill. For example, all magical skills require a casting trait from the relevant magical school. So, a character training Draining Touch must first take the Necromancy Casting trait.

Skill Development

Skill acquisition and development is covered in the Character Development section back on page 14.

Energy

Each character’s energy pool is their capacity for action at any given moment. In strenuous situations ” such as combat ” energy is depleted and replenished from round to round.

Energy Pool Rule: The character’s maximum energy is the sum of their three highest attributes.

Rule: The character’s energy pool contains their current available energy.

Rule: Characters use energy from their energy pool to perform actions.

The character’s maximum energy is equal to their three highest attribute ratings, and the character’s energy pool holds their currently available energy. Characters draw from their energy pool to perform actions, reactions, attacks, move, or even augment their defenses. Their energy pool depletes as that character performs actions from moment to moment, and refills at the start of the character’s turns. The best way to visualize and manage a character’s energy pool is with dice. So at the start of combat, the player lays one d10 die for each die in their character’s energy pool. During combat these dice are spent and moved to a discard pile, added into an action or defense pool, or expended. Example: Jager Broadbough, our stealthy tree-dweller, has Agility ????, Acuity ???, and Influence ???. This gives him a maximum energy of «?.

Starting Energy in Combat Rule: The character’s energy pool is full at the start of combat.

Rule: The character’s starting energy pool can be modified.

When combat begins, characters normally start with a full energy pool. However, this can be reduced or increased depending on circumstances or previous activity. Bonus energy can be added in the energy pool at the start of combat. For example, a character can gain bonus energy if have a condition that grants them additional energy. Alternatively, a character’s starting energy can be reduced if the character is surprised, if they are subject to an ongoing condition (such as being Enervated), by strenuous activity immediately before the combat, or if they have expended some of their energy.

More details about surprise are in the Combat Encounters section on page 37. Example: The three raiders, unaware of Jager’s presence in the trees above them, are surprised when he launches his attack. Jager begins combat with a full energy pool: «?. Surprised, the hapless raiders are placed below Jager in the initiative order, and they only have energy equal to their two highest attributes, rather than their three highest.

Using Energy Rule: Energy can be spent, added, or expended from the character’s energy pool.

Rule: Spent energy is discarded to pay the cost of an action or reaction.

Rule: Added energy goes into an action or defense pool.

Rule: Expended energy is discarded to pay the cost of an action or reaction or as the result of another character’s actions.

Rule: Expending energy temporarily reduces the character’s maximum energy.

Rule: Bonus energy cannot be expended.

Energy is used in one of three ways:

  • Spend
  • Add
  • Expend

Spending Energy

When an action or reaction has the keyword spend, the player must spend energy from their character’s energy pool to pay the cost of an action or reaction. Spent energy is recovered when the character next regains energy (details in the following section: Regaining Energy on page 20). If the action, reaction, or used equipment specifies it, the character immediately gains bonus dice to the appropriate action or defense pool. Example: Hans Gruber, armed with a .38 revolver, makes a ranged attack. He spends ? energy to fire the gun, and immediately gains ?? bonus dice to his action pool.

Adding Energy

In addition to the dice gained from the action, reaction, or equipment, characters can also use more energy when the add keyword is present. Energy added goes from the character’s energy pool into the action or defense pool. When adding energy, characters can add energy up to the rating of the attribute being used for the action. For example, in the previous example of firing the .38, the player can choose to add additional energy to the action to increase the number of dice in the action pool. Example: As Hans Gruber falls toward the ground far below, he spends ? energy to make a ranged attack with the revolver (immediately gaining ?? bonus dice) and also adds ?? energy to better aim the gun, giving an action pool of ????.

Expending Energy

In certain strenuous situations, characters can choose ” or be forced ” to expend energy (keyword: expend). Expended energy is only recovered through proper rest, so expending energy reduces the character’s maximum energy until they rest. For example, as in the previous example, the player can use one their character’s skills to expend energy, which immediately grants them bonus energy. Example: Poor Hans Gruber, falling to his death… But like all good villains, he has one last trick: the Last Gasp skill. Low on energy and likely to soon die, Hans expends ? energy and gains ??? bonus energy (Hans’ Last Gasp rating is ???). As before, Hans spends ? energy to make a ranged attack with the revolver (immediately gaining ?? bonus dice) and also adds ?? energy to better aim the gun, giving an action pool of ????. BLAM! The shot misses! But now Hans still has ??? left in his pool, so he chooses to repeat the previous ranged attack in the hope of exacting some cruel revenge…

Using Bonus Energy

Bonus energy can be spent or added, but it cannot be expended.

Regaining Energy Rule: Starting from the second combat round, characters regain energy equal to their three highest attributes at the start of their turn.

Rule: Characters cannot regain energy that exceeds their maximum energy.

Rule: The amount of energy that characters regain each turn can be modified by the effects of actions, reactions, or conditions.

Rule: A character’s energy pool can exceed its maximum if they gain bonus energy.

Beginning with the second combat round, at the start of each character’s combat turn their energy pool regains energy equal to their three highest attribute ratings. If this would exceed the character’s maximum energy, then the extra energy is discarded. In some circumstances, the amount of energy characters regain is modified, such as through magic that grants you bonus energy or a condition that reduces the energy regain. Furthermore, dead, dying, or unconscious characters do not regain energy. Expended energy is not recovered during combat or strenuous situations.

Recovering Expended Energy Rule: Expended energy is recovered when the character rests.

Expended energy is not recovered until characters take a short or a long rest. At a short rest, characters recover expended energy equal to their Stamina rating. At a long rest characters recover all of their expended energy.

For details about recovering expended energy, see the Resting section on page 28.

Expending All Energy Rule: Characters that expend all energy fall unconscious at the resolution of their current action or reaction.

If a character expends all of their energy, they fall unconscious immediately after their current action resolves.

Energy Pool Usage Examples

This first example demonstrates a simple attack/defense sequence. Example: This character starts with a full energy pool, and acts first in combat: Energy Pool: ????? ??? The first thing the character does is walk 10’ (costing ??): Energy Pool: ????? ??? The character makes an attack, spending ?? and then adding a further ??? energy to the attack: Energy Pool: ????? ??? The player elects to pass priority turn at this point, saving ? for reactions. During the GM’s turn, a monster attacks the character. The player chooses to add ? energy (their last energy) to their character’s Dodge reaction, which increases the character’s physical defense (PD) pool by one die: Energy Pool: ????? ??? The character now has no energy. At the start of the character’s next turn, they regain their energy: Energy Pool: ????? ???

Let’s try something a little bit more sophisticated for this next example. In this case, the character starts combat having previously expended some energy and ” for extra credit ” is acting second in the combat. This example is important because it demonstrates the cost and considerations of acting later in the initiative order, and energy regaining when the character has expended some energy. Note that this character does not regain energy at the start of their first turn.

Example: The character starts with full energy, except for the expended energy: Energy Pool: ????? ??? The enemy has higher initiative than the character. The enemy immediately launches an attack at the character. The player adds ? to their character’s Dodge reaction: Energy Pool: ????? ??? The enemy ends its turn at this point, passing play to our character. Because this is our character’s first turn in combat, they do not regain energy. The character makes an attack, spending ?? to use a handgun and then adding an additional ? energy: Energy Pool: ????? ??? The player elects to finish their character’s turn, mindful that the enemy has another turn before the character regains energy. The enemy attacks again, and the character uses the last of their energy (??) to aid their defense: Energy Pool: ????? ??? The character now has no energy, and must wait for their next turn when they regain energy. However, because they have two energy expended, the character’s energy pool only regains six energy: Energy Pool: ????? ???

In this final example, the character acquires a condition that reduces the amount of energy that they regain each turn. Example: Again, the character starts with full energy: Energy Pool: ????? ??? The character’s turn is first, and they use all of their energy on attacks: Energy Pool: ????? ??? The enemy attacks the character, and this attack leaves the character Enervated (they only regain energy equal to their two highest attributes). The enemy ends their turn. The character regains energy equal to their two highest attributes, which is not enough to refill their energy pool: Energy Pool: ????? ??? The character attacks, using only ?? energy, and then passes the priority. Energy Pool: ????? ??? During the enemy’s attack, the character uses another ?? to defend: Energy Pool: ????? ??? When the character next regains energy, they regain energy equal to their two highest attributes (due to the Enervated condition), enough to refill their energy pool: Energy Pool: ????? ???

Attacks Rule: Attacks are made using attack actions.

Rule: Each target of an attack defends with their defense pool.

Rule: Attack actions are instigated during a character’s turn.

While combat is covered in depth in Combat section on page 37, basic attack mechanics are covered here, and basic defense mechanics are covered in the Defenses section on page 23. Attacks use opposed rolls, where the attacker rolls their action pool against the target’s defense pool.

S.A.G.E. Steps

Action pools are constructed using the S.A.G.E. process and take into account the character’s attributes, skills, equipment, and any external factors. The key to this process is that the player is free to choose whether to commit more or less of their character’s energy to an attack.

Step 1: Spend: First, the attack’s cost is paid by spending or expending energy and if the attacker is using a weapon, the action pool gains dice equal to the weapon’s rating.

Step 2: Add: Second, the player can choose to add more energy to the attack, up to their rating in the attribute that is being used.

Step 3: Gain: Third, if the player has a skill that applies to the attack (such as Melee Weapons for an attack with a sword), then they gain bonus dice into the action pool equal to their skill rating, but not higher than the amount of extra energy they added in the second step.

Step 4: Externalities: Finally, with the pool constructed, the pool is modified to take into account any externalities, such as situational advantages or disadvantages, or ongoing conditions that the character has accumulated.

Making the Attack

Once the attack the defense pools are constructed, these are rolled against each other. Ordinarily, attacks deal 1 damage for each success in the opposed rolls. However, the damage may be adjusted by specialized martial skills, conditions, or traits.

Example Attack: Melee Attack

In the previous energy pool examples, the attack process was illustrated in a single step. In this example, the process is shown with each of the steps that constructs the action pool, so let’s take a closer look. Example: Before the attack, the character has six energy in their energy pool: Energy Pool: ????? ??? First, the player makes their character perform a melee attack with a machete, spending ??? and gaining ??? into their action pool: Energy Pool: ????? ??? Action pool: ??? Second, the player decides to add ?? extra energy to bolster the attack: Energy Pool: ????? ??? Action pool: ????? Third, the character has a rating ??? in Melee Weapons, so gains ?? bonus dice for the attack. The character doesn’t gain the full ??? bonus dice for their Melee Weapons rating because they only added ?? energy: Energy Pool: ????? ??? Action pool: ????? ?? The attack is a melee attack and the character has no advantages, disadvantages, or conditions, so there are no externalities to modify the action pool. Ultimately, the character has used ????? energy and has ????? ?? dice in their action pool (??? from the weapon’s rating, ?? from the added energy, and ?? from the character’s Melee Weapons skill).

Defenses Rule: Defenses are used when a character is attacked.

Rule: Physical defense is used for physical attacks.

Rule: Mental defense is used for attacks against the mind.

While combat is covered in depth in the Combat Encounters section on page 37, basic defense details are included here. Opposed rolls require the attacker and the defender to each roll their respective pools; Action pool versus defense pool. Depending on the type of attack, the defender will use their appropriate defenses:

  • Physical defense (PD)
  • Mental defense (MD)

While both defense pools start with at least one die, characters need to balance their energy between making strong attacks and keeping some energy in reserve to supplement their defenses.

Physical Defense

When a defender is the target of an attack against their physical defense (PD), their defense pool starts with one die (?), plus extra dice for the character’s armor, and finally player can use their character’s skills, reactions, or equipment to add more dice. All characters can use Dodge to add energy to their defense pool. Example: When targeted with a melee attack in combat, the player decides to use Dodge (a default reaction that all characters have) to add ?? energy to the character’s defense pool, on top of the character’s physical defense (PD) of ??, giving a defense pool of ????.

In addition to Dodge, characters can train in skills that grant them bonuses to their defense pool or allow them to use equipment that can augment their defenses. Example: A character with Shield Training and holding a light shield is the target of a ranged attack. The player chooses for the character to spend ? to use the shield to fend off the attack, which allows the character to gain ?? bonus dice to their defense pool.

Mental Defense

When the defender is the target of an attack against their mind and psyche, they defend with their mental defense (MD). Characters’ MD pool starts with dice equal to the middle rating of their Influence, Intelligence, or Acuity attributes. For example, if a character has ratings of Influence ?, Intelligence ???, and Acuity ?, then their MD is ?. Alternatively, if a character has Influence ?????, Intelligence ???, and Acuity ? then their MD is ???. In addition to their base MD pool, players can use their character’s skills or reactions to add to their MD pool. Example: During combat a character is targeted with a psionic attack against their mental defense (MD). Normally, the defender’s defense pool would be the middle rating of their Intelligence, Influence, or Acuity attributes, but this character also has the Iron Will skill (rating ????). The skill allows the player to add up to ???? energy to increase the character’s MD pool.

Attribute Tests Rule: Attribute tests determine success in physical and mental tests.

Over the hours, days, and weeks of an adventure or mission, characters’ capabilities are tested. Characters’ bodies are challenged by the world around them, their minds tested by puzzles and intellectual trials, and their socialization stretched when trying to convince, charm, or manipulate others. These situations are resolved through attribute tests, where a character’s underlying attributes and any related skills are tested against the task. In these tests, the most appropriate of the character’s six attributes is selected, along with an appropriate skill. When a character is balancing on a narrow ledge, the challenge is expressed as: Agility (Acrobatics).

Types of Attribute Tests Rule: Attribute tests are either fixed or opposed.

Attribute tests come in two forms:

  • Fixed tests
  • Opposed tests

Fixed tests are made against unvarying obstacles, while opposed tests are used when the obstacles are trying to actively and variably oppose the attempt or where the difficulty of a challenge fluctuates. For example, kicking open a door is a fixed test while wrestling an alligator is an opposed test. There are some instances where the choice of a fixed or opposed test is not immediately clear, such as in the example of calming a riotous mob. While the mob could be treated as an opposed test, it’s more appropriate to treat these as fixed test and for the GM to assign an appropriate difficulty target for the attempt. In these cases, it’s up to the GM to determine whether there is a significant level of variability in the opposition to the test, in which case an opposed test would be used instead of a fixed test.

Fixed Tests Rule: Fixed tests are used against static obstacles.

Rule: In fixed tests, the character rolls their pool against a difficulty number.

Rule: Each die that is equal to or higher than the difficulty number is a success.

Fixed tests are against static obstacles that do not vary as characters interact with them. These tests are made against a static difficulty number. Here are some examples of fixed tests:

  • Climb a wall: Strength (Athletics)
  • Pick a lock: Agility (Thievery)
  • Escape rope bindings: Agility (Acrobatics)
  • Decipher a code: Intelligence (Knowledge: Cryptology)
  • Notice a hidden threat: Acuity (Perception)
  • Search for a clue: Intelligence (Investigation)

Example: The rough stone wall is almost sheer, but there a good number of hand-holds. Make an Agility (Acrobatics) or Strength (Athletics) test at difficulty 9. If you have a rope or something else to help, you can gain ?? bonus dice.?

Opposed Tests Rule: Opposed tests are used when the attempt is opposed or variable.

Rule: In opposed tests, all involved participants roll their pools against each other.

Rule: The instigator gains successes for each die that is equal to or higher than the highest die of all other participants.

Rule: When the participants are attempting to achieve the same goal, successes are only granted for dice that are higher than those of all other participants.

Dynamic tests are against obstacles that actively oppose the character. For these attribute tests, both the character and their opposition roll attribute tests, and the winner (and loser) is determined using the normal opposed roll mechanics. Furthermore, some examples of opposed tests involve the resolution of actions where multiple characters are seeking to achieve the same goal in opposition to each other. In these situations, the normal opposed mechanics are used, but any character can win the test. Some examples include:

  • Grapple another person: Strength (Athletics) vs Agility (Acrobatics)
  • Dodge past a guard: Agility (Acrobatics) vs Strength (Athletics)
  • Convince a lady to dance: Influence (Seduction/Perform) vs Acuity (Insight)
  • Calm down an angry drunk: Influence (Persuasion) vs Stamina (Resist)
  • Win a poker game: Intelligence (Deception) vs Intelligence (Insight)

Example: I don’t think you understand. I came here to die. And it don’t matter much to me whether I die here, or I die yonder. But I guarantee that you’ll die face down in the dirt right here, one way or another…? The GM speaks,‚ So you’re trying to intimidate the rustler. Okay, make an opposed Agility (Intimidation) test against the rustler’s Influence (Insight).? The player,‚ Agility? Isn’t Intimidation based on Strength??‚ Yeah, usually the GM replies,‚ but you’ve got a revolver pointed at him, so Agility’s more appropriate than Strength. Now fill your hand, you son of a bitch!?

Resolving Attribute Tests Rule: The dice pool for an attribute test is the attribute rating plus the relevant skill rating (but no higher than the underlying attribute).

Rule: The dice pool for an attribute test in combat is the added energy (up to the attribute rating) plus bonus dice equal to the skill rating (up to the amount of energy that they’ve added).

Rule: If a character is the target of an opposed attribute test, they can oppose the test with dice equal to their attribute without spending energy. However, if they add energy, they gain bonus dice from any relevant skills.

Fixed Attribute Tests

When attempting a fixed attribute test, the dice pool of the character attempting the challenge is equal to their attribute rating and their relevant skill rating. This pool is rolled against the difficult target of the challenge, which is normally from 7 to 10 (determined by the GM, based on the difficulty of the task at hand).

Opposed Attribute Tests

When attempting an opposed attribute test, the dice pool of each character attempting the challenge is equal to their attribute rating and their relevant skill rating. These pools are rolled against each other to determine the winner of the challenge.

Which Attribute and Which Skill?

An attribute test will always specify an attribute and skill that can be used for the test. However, the GM and players can substitute the specified attribute and skill for others that make sense for the task. For example, climbing a rope might list Strength (Athletics) as the relevant combination of attribute and skill, but with the GM’s approval the player may use Agility (Acrobatics) instead. Similarly, when a character tries to blend in with a crowd, instead of Agility (Stealth), a player may suggest the character uses Influence (Deception) to change their appearance.

Assisting Attribute Tests

When several characters want to work together to attempt an attribute test, but only one can perform the action, the other characters can assist. In this situation, one character attempts the attribute test, and their action pool gains dice equal to the relevant skill ratings of the characters who are assisting.

Attribute Tests Using Energy

When attempting an attribute test in combat, the attempt requires the characters to use their energy and the task must be one that can be achieved in just a few seconds, not minutes. As with other combat actions, the character can spend energy up to the relevant attribute, and then they gain bonus dice up to the rating of the relevant skill, but not higher than the amount of energy they’ve spent. Finally, if a character is the target of an opposed attribute test (such as a grapple attempt), then they can oppose the test with dice equal to their appropriate attribute without spending energy. However, they only gain energy from their relevant skill if they add energy to their action pool.

Health Rule: Each character has health that determines whether they are alive, unconscious, dying, or dead.

The character’s health represents the soundness of their physical body and their ability to keep moving and fighting, whereas moment to moment effort and fatigue are handled through the energy system. These two factors combine to determine how much effort characters can expend in any one moment as well as how much of a beating they can endure.

Maximum Health Rule: A character’s maximum health is determined by their size and Stamina and any other relevant traits.

The maximum health of all characters is determined by a combination of traits and the character’s Stamina attribute. For a normal humanoid, their maximum health is 3 plus twice their Stamina rating. This base value (3) is different for characters that are larger or smaller, or those that have physical traits ” such as Tough or Scrawny ” that adjust their health.

The relevant traits are detailed in the Traits section on page 43. Example: Jesse is creating a new character, a dwarf called Carlos. Dwarves have three key traits; Small, Sturdy, and Dark Vision. When working out Carlos’ maximum health, Jesse uses a few bits of information:

  • Carlos’ Stamina is ???
  • A Sturdy character’s Stamina is effectively 1 higher when calculating maximum health
  • Maximum health for Small characters is 2 + twice their Stamina So, Carlos the dwarf’s maximum health is 2 + (2 x ????), giving 10.

Current Health Rule: The player’s health changes dynamically as they take damage or recover lost health through healing or rest.

The character’s maximum health defines them at their most robust. The character’s health tracks their current status, and fluctuates with damage, rest, and healing.

Damage reduces a character’s heath, as detailed in the Damage section on page 27.

Rest and healing increases the character’s health, as described in the Healing section on page 28.

Changing Maximum Health Rule: Maximum health is automatically adjusted if the character’s Stamina, size, or other traits change.

Rule: When a character’s maximum health increases, their health does not change until they rest.

Rule: If a character’s maximum health decreases, their health cannot be higher than their new maximum health.

A character’s maximum health is automatically changed when the character’s Stamina changes (such as when a player spends Character Points to increase the character’s Stamina rating).

As mentioned in the Traits section on page 16, it is unusual but not impossible for a character to gain a trait during play that will also adjust their maximum health. If a character’s maximum health changes, then they must wait until they next take a rest to increase their health up to its new value. Conversely, if a character’s maximum health is somehow reduced, then their health cannot be higher than their new maximum health and must be immediately reduced.

Damage

Heroic characters routinely face dangerous situations, such as marauding enemies or an environmental challenge, where they are likely to take damage.

Taking Damage Rule: Damage is immediately subtracted from a character’s health.

When an attack or attribute test damages a character, the damage is immediately subtracted from the character’s health. When the character’s health is 0 or less:

  • 0 health: Character is unconscious and stabilized
  • Negative health: Character is dying and unconscious
  • Negative maximum health: Character is dead

Resistance, Immunity, or Vulnerability Rule: Characters can be resistant, immune, or vulnerable to types of damage.

Rule: Damage resistance reduces damage by half (round up).

Rule: Damage immunity reduces damage to 0.

Rule: Damage vulnerability doubles damage.

Different characters may have traits that grant them vulnerability or resistance to specific types of damage. For example, a character with a unique robust carapace could be resistant to slashing damage but vulnerable to bludgeoning damage, while a robot could be immune to radiation but vulnerable to electro-magnetic damage. When a character is vulnerable to damage they take, that damage is doubled. When a character is resistant to damage they take, that damage is halved (round up). When a character is immune to damage they take, damage is reduced to 0.

Damage Types Rule: All damage has a type.

All damage has a type which is used to determine whether characters are vulnerable, resistant, or immune to that specific type of damage. Damage types include:

Physical:

  • Piercing
  • Bludgeoning
  • Slashing

Elemental:

  • Fire
  • Sonic
  • Cold
  • Acid
  • Electricity
  • Electromagnetic

Physiological:

  • Poison
  • Drowning
  • Radiation
  • Dehydration
  • Hypoxia
  • Starvation

Magical:

  • Force
  • Profane
  • Radiant
  • Necrotic
  • Arcane

Mental:

  • Psychic
  • Sanity

NEW PAGE Death and Dying

Unconscious Rule: Characters are unconscious at 0 or less health.

When a character is reduced to 0 health or less, they immediately become unconscious, fall Prone to the ground (assuming gravity), and can no longer take actions or reactions. If a character is reduced to exactly 0 health, they are unconscious and stabilized, otherwise, they are unconscious and dying.

Dying (and Unconscious) Rule

Characters are dying when on negative health (unless stabilized).

Rule: Dying characters can stabilize automatically or by another character.

When a character takes damage that reduces them to a negative health value, then they are unconscious and dying. Dying characters lose 1 health at the start of each turn. Dying characters need to be stabilized before they die, which happens when their health is reduced to their negative maximum health. Another character can stabilize a dying character if they succeed at an Acuity (First Aid) or Intelligence (Medicine) test at difficulty 8. Additionally, during their turn, the dying character can make a Stamina (Endurance) test at difficulty 10. If they succeed, they are stabilized.

Stabilized (and Unconscious)

Stabilized characters remain at their current health.

Rule: Stabilized characters return to dying if they take further damage.

A stabilized character does not lose health at the start of their turn. However, they return to dying if they take any damage while in this state. If a character is unconscious and stabilized, then each minute they can make a Stamina (Endurance) test at difficulty 10. The character recovers 1 health for each success, and if their health is 1 or higher they are no longer unconscious.

Dead Rule

Characters die when their health reaches their negative maximum health.

Rule: Dead characters can be saved by medical or magical intervention.

If a character takes enough damage to reach a negative health value equal to their maximum health, then that character dies. This could be dealt by a single significant attack in combat, or it could be incurred progressively when a character is dying.

Dead characters can be bought back to dying if another character succeeds an Acuity (First Aid) or Intelligence (Medicine) test at difficulty 10, requiring one success for each minute that the character has been dead. If this test is successful, the character recovers 1 health and is dying (but not stabilized). Each attempt takes one minute.

Healing Rule: Health is recovered through healing.

The trials of a character’s adventuring test their physical bodies and their reserves of energy, so it is critical that characters take time to recover when they can, otherwise they will soon find themselves unable to stand and fight any longer. Physical injuries can be addressed through periods of rest, or through specific healing interventions, whether they are medical or magical.

Healing Rule: Healing can occur physically or magically.

Rule: Physical healing is via resting, first aid, or medical attribute tests.

Rule: Magical healing is via healing skills.

While resting offers characters the opportunity to heal damage, they can also use physical and ” if the game allows it ” magical means to heal damage. To physically heal a character, another character takes several minutes to attempt an Intelligence (Medicine) or Acuity (First Aid) attribute test at difficulty 8. For each success, the target recovers 1 health. A character can attempt to heal themself, but the difficult is increased to 9. Equipment such as a medical kit or a first-aid kit grants bonus dice to these challenges. Multiple attempts can be made to heal a character. However, once one of these attempts succeeds (regardless of how many successes were achieved), that character cannot be physically healed again until after the next encounter. Characters with magical traits and the corresponding healing skills can use these skills’ spell actions to heal themselves and others. When healing is performed on an unconscious character, then the recovered health is added to that character’s current health. If this additional health takes the character’s current health to 1 or higher, the character regains consciousness.

Resting Rule: Health is recovered through rest.

Rule: Expended energy is recovered through rest.

The challenges that characters face test their physical bodies and their reserves of energy, so characters must rest when they can.

Short Rest Rule: Characters can take a short rest after a strenuous encounter.

Rule: At the end of a short rest, characters recover health and expended energy equal to their Stamina rating.

Rule: Unconscious or stabilized characters automatically recover to 1 health and recover at least 1 expended energy at a short rest.

Rule: Short rests are 30 minutes.

After strenuous encounters, such as combat or other perilous situations, characters can rest. Short rests are generally 30 minutes, and may include light activity. When a character takes a short rest, they recover health and expended energy equal to their Stamina rating. The GM may require a shorter or longer duration for short rests. Characters may have traits or skills that adjust the amount of health or expended energy recovered, or the duration of the rest. The recovery of the health and energy occurs at the end of the short rest, so it is not effective if the characters are interrupted during their rest. During this short rest the characters’ recovery involves:

  • Recovering and recharging from exertion and fatigue
  • Cleaning, repairing, bandaging, or stitching wounds and damage
  • Maintaining and cleaning weapons and armor
  • Using healing medicines, poultices, elixirs, salves, or herbs
  • Meditating, centering, communing, calibrating, or praying

Long Rest Rule: Once per day characters can take a long rest.

Rule: At a long rest, characters recover all health and expended energy.

Rule: Long rests are 8 hours, unless otherwise determined by the GM.

Once per day characters can take a long rest. This long rest usually takes the form of a good night’s sleep, during which the characters recover all of the health that they have lost and all of the energy they have expended. Long rests are generally 8 hours, but the GM may require a shorter or longer duration and characters may have traits or skills that adjust the duration of the rest period.

If characters are interrupted during a long rest, they partially recover their lost health and expended energy.

Movement Rule: The speed of movement on foot, mounted, or by vehicle varies depending on effort, duration, armor, encumbrance, terrain, weather and conditions.

The speed of a character’s movement is important in three main situations:

  • Combat
  • Dangerous situations
  • Extended travel

Outside of these three areas, the speed at which characters move only requires precise measurement if the characters are in a time-critical situation.

Measurement Units

Although all of the combat measurements in Forge Engine games are in feet (usually 5’ increments) and miles, these can easily be adjusted to metric measures:

  • Convert each 5’ measure into 2 meters or 2 yards
  • Convert each mile into 1.5 kilometers (or 1.6 if you want to be even more precise, but who’s got the time for that…)

Movement Speed Rule: A character’s movement speed is based on their size trait.

Each character’s movement speed (abbreviated to move) is derived from their size trait. Normal humans are Medium size, and other species or traits can change a character’s movement speed:

Character Size Combat Movement Tiny 20’ Small 25’ Medium, Large 30’ Huge 35’ Titanic 40’

Skills or traits can increase or decrease these movement speeds.

Combat Movement Rule: The Move and Run actions detail movement in combat.

Rule: Characters can move through allies.

Rule: Characters can only move through enemies by succeeding at an opposed Strength (Athletics) or Agility (Acrobatics) attribute test.

Rule: Characters can move diagonally between enemies (if using a grid).

Rule: Characters cannot move diagonally around corners (if using a grid).

In combat, characters’ movement distance is governed by their movement speed, which depends on their size. Movement requires energy, usually ? for each 5’ of movement, and uses the Move action. Characters can also run in combat using the Run action, which doubles the distance that they cover. While running gets the destination faster, characters can’t use reactions during these actions, so they are very vulnerable to attack when running. In the hurly burly of combat, characters can move among and around other combatants. In these situations characters can move through their allies, but in order to push past or slip past an enemy they need to succeed an opposed Strength (Athletics) or Agility (Acrobatics) attribute test. If using a grid for combat, characters (C) can move diagonally between allies (A) or enemies (E), but they cannot move diagonally around corners, as shown below:

Travel Rule: Parties travel on foot or mounted for up to 10 hours per day.

Rule: Groups travel at the speed of the slowest member.

A full day’s travel for fit adventurous types is 10 hours. For normal people, this is more like 8 hours, once rest and fatigue is taken into account.

On Foot Rule: A character’s walking speed is 1 MPH plus 1 MPH for each Stamina rating.

Rule: Worn armor reduces Movement Speed for extended foot travel by 1 MPH for every ? of the armor’s rating (minimum 1 MPH).

Rule: Running and sprinting durations are based on Stamina.

As with any group, adventuring groups undertaking extended travel move at the speed of the slowest member. Furthermore, wearing armor reduces the Movement Speed of characters who travel on foot over long distances. For every rating of the armor, the character’s speed is reduced by 1 MPH. Stamina Rating Walking Speed Running Speed Running Duration Est. 10H Distance ????? 2 MPH 4 MPH 1 mins 20 miles ????? 3 MPH 6 MPH 5 mins 30 miles ????? 4 MPH 8 MPH 15 mins 40 miles ????? 5 MPH 10 MPH 1 hour 50 miles ????? 6 MPH 12 MPH 4 hours 60 miles.

Mounted

The domestication of horses and other mounts expanded people’s range. Generally, horses can trot for an hour, canter for 30 minutes, and gallop just a few miles. Mount Walking Speed Trot Speed Canter Speed Gallop Speed Est. 10H Distance Mule 3 MPH 5 MPH 7 MPH 10 MPH 30 miles Nag 4 MPH 8 MPH 12 MPH 16 MPH 40 miles Warhorse 5 MPH 10 MPH 15 MPH 20 MPH 50 miles Riding Horse 6 MPH 12 MPH 18 MPH 24 MPH 60 miles Thoroughbred 7 MPH 14 MPH 22 MPH 28 MPH 70 miles Cart 4 MPH 6 MPH 7 MPH 8 MPH 40 miles Wagon 3 MPH 4 MPH 5 MPH 6 MPH 30 miles.

Water Vehicles

There are several broad types of boats, including rowboats, sailboats, and motorboats. All types of boats (other than pure sailboats) can travel at double speed for short periods. Obviously, this will tire the rowers, so this fatigue must be managed. Water Vehicle Normal Speed Double Speed Est. 10H Distance Rowboat (15’) 1 ½ MPH 5 MPH 15 miles Sail Boat (40’) 4 MPH 8 MPH 40 miles Sailing Ship (60’) 6 MPH 10 MPH 60 miles Longship (75’) 7 MPH 15 MPH 70 miles Motorboat (20-40’) 20 MPH 40 MPH 300 miles Speedboat (20-50’) 45 MPH 90 MPH 600 miles Cruise or Cargo Ship 20 MPH 25 MPH 200 miles

Modern Vehicles

The invention of simple and complex machines greatly expanded people’s ability to cover large distances. Bicycles require parts and maintenance, but other vehicles require infrastructure for roads and rails, fuel, and maintenance. Vehicle Normal Speed Double Speed Est. 10H Distance Bicycle 10 MPH 20 MPH 150 miles Road Bike 20 MPH 40 MPH 200 miles Motorbike 75 MPH 150 MPH 1000 miles Car 50 MPH 100 MPH 750 miles Bus 35 MPH 50 MPH 400 miles Train 50 MPH 100 MPH 750 miles

Terrain and Conditions

The movement speeds and distances given for each of the modes is based on good travel conditions; flat, made ground and fine weather.

Terrain Effects Terrain On Foot Mounted Vehicle Road or open track Normal Normal Normal Hilly road or track ¾ speed ¾ speed ¾ speed Mountain path or track ½ speed ½ speed ¼ speed Mountain off track ¼ speed Impassable Impassable Jungle path ½ speed ¼ speed Impassable Jungle off path ¼ speed Impassable Impassable Swamp ¼ speed Impassable Impassable

Weather Effects on Animals and Motorized Vehicles Weather Animal Motorized Scorching ½ speed Normal Hot ¾ speed Normal Mild Normal Normal Raining ¾ speed ¾ speed Torrential ½ speed ½ speed Blizzard ¼ speed ¼ speed

Weather Effects on Water Vehicles Weather Rowboat Sailboat Motorized Becalmed Normal 0 speed Normal Ideal Normal Double speed Normal Favorable Normal Normal Normal Calm Normal ½ speed Normal Gale ½ speed ¾ speed ¾ speed Stormy ¼ speed ½ speed ½ speed Upstream ½ speed ½ speed ¾ speed Downstream Double speed Double speed Normal

Equipment

Equipment runs the full spectrum from mundane, through necessary, to practical. For the sake of this overview, equipment is grouped into specific categories:

  • Tools
  • Weapons
  • Armor and shields
  • Consumables
  • Accessories
  • Clothing

The carrying around of all of this stuff is detailed under Encumbrance below. Additionally, the manner in which the equipment is held by the character is covered in Carrying Equipment below.

Tools Rule: Tools give bonus dice to appropriate attribute tests.

Tools are those pieces of equipment that have a direct impact on the character’s attribute tests by adding additional bonus dice to the tests, such as these examples:

  • Crowbar for Strength (Athletics)
  • Lock-picks for Agility (Thievery)
  • Stimpacks for Stamina (Endurance)
  • Excalibur for Influence (Leadership)
  • Binoculars for Acuity (Perception)
  • Computer Manuals for Intelligence (Knowledge: Technology)

Weapons Rule: Weapons are required for some melee attacks, and all ranged and thrown attacks.

Weapons are straightforward, these are pieces of equipment that, when used, are designed to do harm to other characters. Examples include:

  • Swords
  • Bows
  • Guns
  • Explosives

Weapons usually have an energy cost that must be spent, and then the ‘power’ of the piece of equipment is reflected in its rating (which are the dice added to the attack pool). The difference between the weapon’s cost and its rating is its effectiveness. So a heavy and clumsy club has a large cost but a relatively low rating, a spiked club has the same large cost but a better rating, a small caliber handgun has a low cost (to reflect the effort of pulling a trigger) and a matching low rating, and a large caliber handgun has a slightly higher cost (because of the heavier recoil) and a much higher rating.

Basic weapons for fantasy and modern games are in the Equipment and Equipment ” Modern sections starting on page 85.

Armor and Shields Rule: Armor is worn to provide protection from physical attacks.

Rule: Shields are wielded to provide protection from physical attacks.

Armor is equipment that is worn to protect against physical attacks. Worn armor automatically gives characters bonus dice to their physical defense pool, but their attributes may be reduced and if the character does not have a corresponding skill, they incur energy penalties when performing actions. Shields are equipment that is wielded to intercede between weapons and their target’s soft parts. Unlike armor, shields do not work automatically, they require skill training to use correctly, and each warded attack requires an expenditure of energy.

Consumables Rule: Consumables are used up in the exercise of an action or activity.

Food and drink to power bodies, petrol to power vehicles, ammunition to power guns, bows and crossbows (although these can be recovered), and healing herbs and medical supplies to supply healers and doctors. True to their name, these items of equipment are used, consumed, in the course of their utilization. In some cases, such as ammunition and petrol, the consumables are required for the operation of their matching items at all. In other cases, the consumables aid in the operation of a thing, such as a human body, and without the consumable the vessel’s effectiveness is progressively reduces. Finally, some consumables work like tools, the assist in an attribute test but are used up in the process.

  • Food and water
  • Petrol
  • Ammunition
  • Healing and medical supplies
  • Accessories Rule: Accessories work in conjunction with another item.

    Rule: Accessories may work in a limited capacity when used independently.

    Accessories are pieces of equipment that operate in concert with another piece of equipment, and on their own are useless (or differently useful). Some examples include:

    • Crossbow lever
    • Rifle scope
    • Under-slung grenade launcher

    Clothing Rule: Clothing can aid attribute tests.

    Clothing’s pretty boring, except when it matters, such as wearing the right clothes to a society function ” Influence (Perform) ” or enduring extreme climates without appropriate clothes for hot or cold weather ” Stamina (Endurance). In such cases the right clothing is worth bonus dice for these attribute tests.

    Encumbrance Optional Rule: Encumbrance can be used at the discretion of the GM and players.

    Optional Rule: Encumbrance is based on the character’s Strength.

    Some groups track characters’ encumbrance, others apply a simple reasonableness test, and others ignore the whole issue entirely. If tracking encumbrance, it should be based on the character’s Strength, and encumbered characters are Slowed.

    Buying Equipment

    The Equipment section does not include prices for each item. To determine the cost of an item, compare the item’s rating to its spend cost, giving a ratio (e.g. 0, 1, 2.5, etc). For items with special features, like variable fire modes, an additional weighting is added to its rating. This ratio is then multiplied, such as by $1,000, to determine the item’s cost.

    Carrying Equipment Rule: Equipment can be worn, wielded, slung, or stowed.

    While GMs and players might decide not to care how much equipment a character carries, it is often important to know where the equipment is on a character’s body. Clothing or armor can be worn; weapons, tools, or shields are wielded (in the character’s main hand or their off-hand), ammunition or items could be slung on a bandolier, belt, or quiver; food and other items could be stowed in a pack or sack.

    • Worn
    • Wielded
    • Wielded (Off-Hand)
    • Slung
    • Stowed

    Improvised Equipment Rule: Equipment can be improvised from specific or mundane items, and can be equally or less effective that the ideal item.

    Most equipment is built for purpose, but there are situations where creative (or desperate) players will improvise equipment, whether it’s by picking up a trashcan lid and using it as a shield, crafting their own crossbow bolts out of wood, fashioning a lock pick from a bent nail, or even creating an improvised ballista out of the leaf springs from a truck’s suspension.

    Conditions Rule: Characters can have multiple conditions simultaneously.

    Rule: Characters can enter and leave situational conditions at will.

    Rule: Ongoing conditions result from attacks, and are removed with Shake It Off.

    Rule: Enforced conditions are instigated and ended with attribute tests.

    Rule: Area conditions are location features, and are escaped by leaving the area.

    Rule: Some conditions can be removed using the Shake It Off action.

    Conditions describe a situational effect on a character, for better or for worse. Each condition has one or more mechanical effects that it imposes, and comes with instructions for ending the condition.

    Situational Conditions

    Situational conditions are straightforward; characters can get themselves into these conditions, and get themselves out of them. Prone is such a condition. A character can drop Prone as a minor action, and that same character can stand up by spending the required energy.

    Ongoing Conditions

    Ongoing conditions are usually imposed on a character as a result of magical spells or martial abilities, and can be removed. These conditions are attached to a target as part of a successful attack, and they remain on the target until their duration elapses or the target removes them by successfully using the Shake It Off action.

    Enforced Conditions

    Enforced conditions are imposed on a target by another character or a similar mechanism, and the target can only escape from the condition by overcoming its originator. For example, a character is Grappled (or Restrained) when another character beats them with an attribute test. That target remains Grappled until they break free of the initiating character, or that character lets them go.

    Area Conditions

    Area conditions affect a location or area. For example, areas filled with smoke, fog, or magical darkness are obscured, and cause characters to be Blinded. Alternatively, physical obstacles (such as quicksand) can cause a character to be Slowed when attempting to move through them. In these examples, the conditions cannot be removed other than by escaping their area. However, in some circumstances these conditions can be mitigated, such as by a character holding their breath when moving through a poisonous fog.

    Action Conditions Dazed Condition You are dazed.

  • You must spend ? extra energy for each action or reaction (except for Shake It Off)
  • When defending attacks against your PD, your defense pool loses ? (min. ? die)
  • Stunned Condition You are stunned.
  • You must spend ?? extra energy for each action or reaction (except for Shake It Off)
  • When defending attacks against your PD, your defense pool loses ?? (min. ? die)
  • Energy Conditions Enervated Condition Your energy replenishment is reduced.
  • When you regain energy, you get energy equal to your two highest attributes Exhausted Condition Your energy replenishment is further reduced.
  • When you regain energy, you get energy equal to your single highest attribute Empowered Condition You are physically and mentally vigorous.
  • When you regain energy, you gain bonus energy equal to your highest attribute Movement Conditions Slowed Condition Your movement is hampered.
  • For each segment of movement (5’ walk, 10’ run), you must spend ? extra energy Immobilized Condition You cannot move.
  • You cannot intentionally move, but you can be pushed or pulled Grappled Condition You are partially restricted, such as by being physically held onto by another character.
  • Your movement is restricted as if you were Immobilized
  • When making attacks, your action pool loses ?? (min. ? die)
  • When defending attacks against your PD, your defense pool loses ? (min. ? die)
  • Restrained Condition You are fully restricted, such as by being heavily bound.
  • Your movement is restricted as if you were Immobilized
  • You cannot perform actions or reactions except to try to remove this condition
  • When defending attacks against your PD, your defense pool loses ?? (min. ? die)
  • Prone Condition You are lying on the ground or similarly vulnerable.
  • For each 5’ of movement you must spend ? extra energy
  • You cannot run
  • To get up you must spend ?? energy
  • When making melee attacks, your action pool loses ?? (min. ? die)
  • When defending melee attacks against your PD, your defense pool loses ?? (min. ? die)
  • When defending ranged attacks by non-adjacent targets, your defense pool gains ?? bonus dice Physical Conditions Poisoned Condition You are poisoned.
  • At the start of each turn you must expend ? energy Incorporeal Condition You are incorporeal (your body is not solid).
  • You can move through solid objects as if you were Slowed
  • When defending martial attacks, you gain ?? bonus dice to your defense pool
  • When making melee attacks, your attack pool loses ?? (min. ? die)
  • Weakened Condition You are physically and mentally weak.
  • Your attacks and attribute tests have 1 fewer successes (min. 1 success)
  • Enfeebled Condition You are physically and mentally drained.
  • Your attacks deal half damage (round up)
  • Your attribute tests have half the number of successes (round up)
  • Sensory Conditions Blinded Condition You cannot see.
  • You automatically fail Acuity (Perception) tests that rely wholly on vision
  • When making attribute tests that include vision (including attacks), your action pool loses ???? (min. ? die)
  • When defending attacks, your defense pool loses ?? (min. ? die)
  • Deafened Condition You cannot hear.
  • You automatically fail Acuity (Perception) tests that rely on wholly hearing
  • When making Acuity (Perception) tests that include hearing, your action pool loses ?? (min. ? die)
  • Visibility Conditions Obscured Condition You are obscured, such as by foliage, low light, or light fog.
  • When making Agility (Stealth) tests, you gain ? bonus die
  • When defending non-area attacks, you gain ? bonus die to your defense pool
  • Faint Condition You are heavily obscured, such as by thick brush, dim light, or heavy fog.
  • When making Agility (Stealth) tests, you gain ?? bonus die
  • When defending non-area attacks, you gain ?? bonus die to your defense pool
  • Invisible Condition You are invisible.
  • You can only be targeted if your attacker is aware of your location.
  • When making Agility (Stealth) tests, you gain ??? bonus dice
  • When defending non-area attacks, you gain ??? bonus dice to your defense pool
  • Combat Encounters

    Ahmed,‚ Merciful Father, I have squandered my days with plans of many things. This was not among them. But at this moment, I beg only to live the next few minutes well. For all we ought to have thought, and have not thought; all we ought to have said, and have not said; all we ought to have done, and have not done; I pray thee God for forgiveness.? Combat is the most mechanical area of Forge Engine games. It’s the place where there is the greatest interaction between many different aspects of the characters; including their health, energy, equipment, attacks, defenses, movement, and reactions. Depending on each game’s genre and the specific circumstances of the adventure, combat takes many different forms. It could be two pugilists fighting a boxing match, a running gun battle in the streets of Mogadishu, a cavalry charge between a group of Templar knights and their Saracen foes, a bumper to bumper road battle in a scorched wasteland, or a bloody fight between a raiding party and a group of ferocious orcs. The combat mechanics of the Forge Engine provide a framework for the resolution of dangerous confrontations, where the participants seek to overcome each through combat, physical, magical, or otherwise. This framework simulates (or approximates) the conditioning and skill level of the combatants, their equipment and inherent capabilities, their movement and tactical positioning, their awareness, and finally the size of each force. Design Note: The design of the Forge Engine’s core mechanic means that no combat is ever impossible. That’s not to say that such a victory is not improbable, perhaps devastatingly so, but there’s always a chance that a weaker character’s high attack pool roll will beat their fearsome opponent’s low defense roll and conversely there is always a chance that that opponent’s many attack dice will not beat the weaker character’s lucky defense roll. This also means that combat in Forge Engine is also swift, and tends to stay swift with higher energy characters. So be prepared.

    Combat Basics Rule: Combat occurs when multiple groups seek to resolve their differences through physical (or magical) force.

    Rule: Combat continues until only one allied group prevails.

    During combat, time is divided into rounds of around 6 seconds. The characters’ turns run concurrently during the round, with the character with the highest initiative having priority at each moment. Any character can take action after the start of their first combat turn, as long as they have priority and the energy to pay for the action. The combat proceeds in rounds until only one allied group remains.

    Terminology

    These terms are the most important for tracking combat encounters:

    • Combat Encounter: A single combat encounter, which is split into rounds.
    • Initiative: The order that characters act at the start of combat, the order of priority, and the order that characters have their turn and regain energy.
    • Round: Rounds are approximately 6 seconds. All player characters, game characters, and monsters take their turns concurrently during a round.
    • Turn: The time in which a character can use their energy to take actions. Each character’s turn overlaps that of the other characters in the combat.
    • Priority: The character with the highest initiative has priority at any moment.
    • Action: A physical action of a character, including attacks, movement, general actions, improvised actions, and reactions.
    • Reaction: An action that is triggered by some external event or action and can happen outside of the character’s turn or during another character’s action.

      Order of Action

      The high-level order of combat encounters is:

      • Determine Surprise
      • Roll for Initiative
      • Establish Positions
      • Normal Rounds
      • Combat Resolution

      Combat Initiation

      Surprise Rule: Surprise is determined if one group of combatants could be caught unaware by another.

      Rule: Characters who fail an Acuity (Perception) test to spot or react to concealed or unexpected attackers are surprised.

      Rule: Characters who are surprised are dropped down the initiative order behind other characters.

      Rule: Characters who are surprised may have their starting energy reduced.

      Rule: Characters who are surprised cannot take reactions until their first turn.

      Often in combat encounters one group of combatants will seek, or gain, advantage by ambushing their opponents. This is referred to as ‘surprise’. The first step is to determine whether surprise is actually required. If one group is not aware of the other, then surprise should be resolved, with each character rolling individually. Depending on the situation, the GM may grant one side or the other bonus dice (or apply penalties as externalities). If one group is actively hiding from the other, then surprise is resolved as an opposed attribute test; Acuity (Perception) versus Agility (Stealth). For example, a group could be walking along a path, unaware that ambushers are stealthily hiding in rocks ahead. If the ambushers successfully hide, then the ambushed group is surprised. Alternatively, if a prepared group comes unexpectedly upon an unprepared group, this is also an opposed attribute test: Acuity (Perception) versus Acuity (Perception), but with penalties or bonuses applied to one or the other of the groups depending on their awareness or preparedness. For example, a group could be walking along a path, an in this case they instead come upon an enemy group at rest in their camp. In this case, the unprepared group could be surprised, but the prepared group could not. Finally, if two groups come upon each other where they are both unprepared, then again this is an opposed attribute test: Acuity (Perception) versus Acuity (Perception). In this example, the group on the path round a corner and come face-to-face with an enemy group coming the other way. Unlike the previous examples, in this case members of either group could be surprised. Example: Julie, your ghilli-suited sniper lies prone in the undergrowth, sighting along the road at the approaching vehicle. I need you to make opposed Agility (Stealth) tests against the vehicle’s driver’s Acuity (Perception).? Julie;‚ I’ve got ???? Agility, plus ???? Stealth. What about my ghilli suit?? GM‚ That’s ???? bonus dice for the excellent camouflage.? Julie,‚ What about being prone in the bushes?? GM‚ ??? bonus dice for being prone, and ?? more dice for the thick bushes.? Julie,‚ So my spotter’s got 17 dice. How many does the driver have?? GM;‚ He’s got ??? Acuity and ??? Perception. But he’s concentrating on the road, so he has disadvantage and his pool loses ??.?

      Initiative Rule: All characters take an Agility (Initiative) test to determine initiative.

      Rule: Characters have priority and regain energy in initiative order.

      Initiative is determined by each character rolling an Agility (Initiative) attribute test. Their highest single die is their position in the initiative order. If there are ties, then count back to their second highest die, and so on. If any of the characters are surprised, then they are dropped down the initiative order to after their opponents. Once combat begins, each character acts, regains energy, and has priority in order of highest initiative to lowest initiative.

      Establish Positions Rule: The location of all combatants must be established before combat.

      Once surprise and initiative have been established, the GM and players should determine the positions of all characters. If using tokens or miniatures, these are placed in position on the grid, hex map or tiles. If playing with purely descriptive combat (as opposed to a grid or tiles), the GM must ensure the party’s marching order or formation is clearly established, and that all players are aware of the geography of the combat area and the position of their character relative to friendly and enemy characters.

      Combat Turn Overview

      Forge Engine combat runs in rounds and turns, and the energy and action/reaction systems allow each character’s combat turn to run concurrently with those of the other combatants. This structure is illustrated in the adjacent diagram, which shows a combat involving four combatants, one of who has been surprised. Each character’s energy regulates their actions, so once their first initiative has passed, characters can use their energy as they wish.

      Actions and Reactions

      When combat begins the character with the highest initiative immediately starts their first turn, and each other non-surprised character can only use reactions. As each character’s first turn begins, they can use actions as well as reactions. Characters who are surprised cannot take actions or reactions until the start of their first turn, which will be at the end of the initiative order.

      One Character’s Turn

      Characters can take actions at any time during their combat turns, as long as they have energy to pay for the action. This means that each character’s combat turn runs concurrently with the combat turns of each other character, as shown in the diagram. In practice, this also means that a player will often declare the end of their character’s actions while they still have energy remaining. When the player declares the end of their character’s actions, the priority passes on to the character with the next highest initiative. Any character who has passed priority can then jump back into the combat cycle whenever they want, as long as another character is not in the middle of an action, and as long as they have energy to pay for the action they want to make. A character could conceivably use all of their energy before any other characters get a chance to take any actions at all. This strategy is high risk, as it leaves that character totally exposed, relying only on their base defenses until they next regain energy.

      Energy and Turns

      Characters usually start combat with full energy, and then they first regain energy at the start of their second turn and then at the start of each subsequent turn. In some cases, characters might start combat with more or less energy than normal, whether it is through a condition or effect, a magical bonus or penalty, a trained skill, or a simply through some circumstance of play. While it might seem that characters should regain energy at the start of their first turn, this would allow characters who are lower in the initiative order to double-dip their energy by using all of their energy on reactions before the start of their first turn, knowing that their energy will refill when their first turn comes around. Ultimately, the Forge Engine combat system means that the energy levels of the combatants rise and fall dynamically throughout the combat.

      Character #1 Initiative 9 Character #2 Initiative 8 Character #3 Initiative 3 Character #4 Surprised!

      Start of combat, all characters start with full energy (unless otherwise modified).

      Turn #1 Reactions Only

      Actions Allowed Reactions Only

      Turn #1 No Reactions

      Actions Allowed

      Turn #1

      Actions Allowed

      Turn #1

      Actions Allowed

      Turn #2

      Regains energy

      Turn #2

      Regains energy

      Turn #2

      Regains energy

      Turn #2

      Regains energy

      Turn #3

      Regains energy

      Turn #3

      Regains energy

      Turn #3

      Regains energy

      Turn #3

      Regains energy

      Turn #4 (etc)

      Regains energy

      ? (cont.) ? (cont.)

      Combat Rounds and Turns

      Rounds Rule: Characters set out their starting energy at the start of combat.

      Rule: Combat is divided into rounds.

      Rule: During each round, each character’s turn runs concurrently.

      Rule: Rounds continue until combat is resolved.

      Each round encompasses the turns of each individual character, starting with the character with the highest initiative, and proceeding through the subsequent characters. All characters set out their starting energy at the start of the first round, and then from the second round characters regain their energy on their turn during the round. Rounds then continue until the combat has resolved, either through the defeat of all but one group or the flight and escape of all opposition.

      Turns Rule: Characters have priority to take actions in initiative order.

      Rule: Characters can use reactions during another character’s actions.

      Rule: From the second round, characters regain energy at the start of their turn.

      Rule: Characters pass priority when they have finished taking actions.

      Rule: Characters can take actions at any time after their first turn, but not during the resolution of another character’s action.

      As play proceeds down the initiative order, each character takes their turn. During the first round of combat characters do not regain energy, as they have already set out their starting energy at the beginning of the combat encounter. At the start of each character’s turn after the first, their energy is replenished. During their turn characters can take actions, including attacks, general actions, movement, and improvised actions. There is no requirement that characters spend all of their available energy immediately after their initiative. In fact, this can leave the character unable to respond to the flow of the battle or to use reactions during the turns of other characters. Characters can use actions at any time after their initiative on the first round. Characters have priority in their initiative order. Each action is carried to its resolution, unless interrupted by an appropriately triggered reaction. Once each action is completed by the character with priority, other players can choose to have their characters perform an action.

      Taking Turns

      Each character’s turn is divided into discrete phases:

      • Start of turn
      • Actions
      • End of turn

      Start of Turn

      The start of each turn is dedicated to housekeeping tasks:

      • Remove effects ending at start of turn
      • Ongoing healing/damage: Adjust health for ongoing healing or damage
      • Dying: Reduce health for dying characters
      • Other effects: Apply regeneration or other effects
      • Regain energy (from their second round)

        Actions

        Each turn, characters use their energy to take actions:

        • Attack actions
        • General actions
        • Movement
        • Improvised actions

        End of Turn

        As with the start of turn, the end of turn is for updating effects:

        • Apply any effects triggering at end of turn
        • Remove effects ending at end of turn
        • Remove effects ending after multiple turns

        Actions Rule: Default actions are common to all characters and include attacks, general actions, and movement.

        Rule: Characters take actions after their initiative in the first round.

        Rule: Characters use their energy to pay for their actions.

        Rule: Players can improvise actions, GMs determine the energy cost.

        Rule: Skills or traits may grant characters additional actions.

        Rule: Each time a character’s action resolves, all characters higher in the initiative order have the opportunity to take an action.

        Actions are the mechanism by which characters interact with the world around them during combat, whether it’s to attack an enemy, to change weapons, to move through the world, or even to leap from a balcony and swing on a chandelier. All of these are examples of the different types of default actions; attacks, general actions, movement, and improvised actions. Each character’s turn is their opportunity to use their available energy to complete their desired actions. A character might move 10’, attack an enemy with their weapon, and then move another 15’ into cover. These actions would be broken down into 10’ of movement (costing ??), followed by a melee attack (costing ???), and then a further 15’ of movement (costing ???), for a total cost of eight energy. The example given above has three discrete actions, and at the resolution of each of those actions all other characters higher in the initiative order have the opportunity to take an action. When multiple characters want to take an action at the same time, the character with the highest initiative has priority, and their action is resolved first. The cycle then repeats at the end of that action, with all higher initiative characters again having the opportunity to take actions. As each character ‘passes’ their opportunity, priority falls through the initiative order until a character chooses to take an action. Players who elect for their characters to forgo their actions usually do so when they have no energy left, or when they are saving some energy in case of a subsequent enemy attack. While the first three kinds of default actions (attacks, general actions, and movement) cover most situations, sometimes characters attempt actions that don’t fall neatly into a defined action. In these cases of improvised actions, the DM simply has to determine an appropriate energy cost or attribute test and difficulty. In addition to the default actions, some skills and traits offer characters additional actions that increase their versatility and capabilities in specific situations.

        Reactions Rule: Reactions can only be used when a certain condition or event occurs, and can be used outside of a character’s turn.

        Rule: Reactions can be taken before a character’s first turn, unless they are surprised.

        Rule: All characters have default reactions, Dodge and Attribute Test (Reaction).

        Rule: Skills or traits may grant characters additional reactions.

        Reactions are special types of actions that are triggered off a specific event or condition, such as:

        • You declare an attack
        • An adjacent ally is attacked
        • An attack against you resolves

        Reactions have a variety of effects, allowing triggered actions or attacks, modifying dice pools, giving opportunities to increase or decrease damage, or granting bonus energy. The default reactions are Dodge and Attribute Test (Reaction) and skills can grant characters more reactions.

        Attack Actions Rule: Attack actions provide instructions for making an attack.

        Rule: Default attacks include Melee and Ranged attacks.

        Rule: Skills and traits can grant characters additional attack actions.

        Rule: Skills and traits can allow characters to make attacks as reactions.

        While attacks are covered in detail in the Attacks section on page 22, a few aspects of these actions are covered here. First, default attack actions include:

        • Melee attacks: A character hits their target with a physical object
        • Ranged attacks: A character aims or throws a launched projectile at their target
        • Furthermore, skills and traits can grant characters the ability to make other kinds of attacks, such as by casting spells to attack. Attacks are normally made as actions, but again skills and traits can allow attacks as reactions to specific triggers.

        Defending Rule: Characters can augment their defenses using reactions and skills.

        As with attack actions, defenses are covered in detail in the Defenses section on page 23, but some additional information is covered here. There are two defenses ” physical and mental ” and each of these can be augmented through skills, traits, equipment, and actions. Physical defense (PD), for example, can be improved through the use of armor and shields, by spending energy to Dodge as a reaction, creating a character with a trait that reduces the character’s size (making them harder to hit), and by training in skills that grant benefits against specific types of attacks or in specific situations. Similarly, mental defense (MD) can be improved through improved attributes, training skills that allow characters to add energy to their defense pool when defending attacks against their MD, and equipment that bolsters their mental defense. Ultimately, these different elements funnel through into the character’s defense pool, usually adding dice to the pool, but sometimes even giving the player the ability to interact with their defense pool in interesting ways.

        Attribute Tests in Combat Rule: Characters can make attribute tests in combat if the task can be completed quickly.

        Rule: Attribute tests in combat require energy.

        As covered in the Attribute Tests section on page 24, characters can attempt attribute tests in combat if the task is one that can be carried out in the short timeframe of a combat round. For example, performing an Acuity (Perception) test to look around can be performed in a combat situation, but replacing the engine block in a ‘55 Chevy is not possible. When attempting these tests in combat, the amount of added energy represents the effort exerted. As with normal attribute tests, if a character has a matching skill, they gain ? bonus die for each added energy (but no higher than the rating of the skill). Example: ‘Lightning’ Jake Mccreed looses two shots from his revolver, dropping the two banditos on the saloon balcony. He pauses to scan the street for further signs of danger. Mccreed has Acuity of ???? and Perception of ????. This is an Acuity (Perception) attribute test, so Mccreed’s player spends ?? energy and gains ?? bonus dice from his Perception skill, giving a total pool of ????. The player could have spent up to ???? energy, which is the maximum allowed by his Acuity, and would have gained the full ???? bonus dice from his Perception, which is rated ????. This would give an action pool of ????? ???.

        Combat Resolution Rule: Combat is resolved when only one allied group remains.

        Eventually, one of the groups of combatants will prevail. Perhaps they’ll have defeated their enemies, or maybe their opponents will have fled. Either way, combat is resolved when the prevailing group’s opposition has been neutralized, one way or another. In the event that the player’s characters are defeated, then they are at the mercy of their enemies. They could be dead, left for dead, captured, or perhaps even mercifully released by their bettors. In these situations the result is up to the GM to determine based on the predisposition of the opponents and the type of game that they are running.

        Combat Actions

        All characters have a default set of combat actions, moves, reactions, and attacks.

        General Actions:

        • Minor Action
        • Attribute Test
        • Grapple
        • Shake It Off
        Attack Actions:

        • Melee Attack
        • Ranged Attack
        Movement Actions:

        • Move
        • Run Reactions:

          • Dodge
          • Attribute Test (Reaction)

            Players can also improvise actions that aren’t covered by these default actions.

            General Actions

            The types of general actions include Minor Action, Attribute Test, Grapple, and Shake It Off. Minor Action is used for actions that require a small (but measurable) expenditure of energy. Attribute Test actions are for tests in combat. Grapple shows how to adjudicate opposed tests in combat, and can be used as a model for other contests, such as shoving or tripping. Finally, Shake It Off is used to break the effects of an ongoing condition, such as when Slowed or Immobilized. Minor Action Action You open your hand and drop your shield, then take your sword with both hands. Make one minor action without any energy cost. For each further minor action, you must spend ?. Minor actions include:

            • Drop a weapon or shield
            • Use a held item or drink a potion
            • Sling a wielded item (shield, bow, etc)
            • Reload a ranged weapon (with ? cost)
            • Quick attribute test (? cost)
            • Drop Prone
            • Draw or sheathe a weapon
            • Retrieve or pick up an item
            • Open or close a normal door

            Attribute Test Action You glance around ” as briefly as possible ” to locate the source of the incoming fire. Add energy to your action pool up to your relevant attribute rating and gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to the rating of a relevant skill.

            Grapple Action You grab the puny human. It struggles, but soon you will feast on its flesh. When you have a free hand, add energy to your action pool up to your Strength rating and gain ? bonus die for each Athletics rating. Then make an opposed attribute test against a target within your reach. The target defends with dice equal to their Strength or Agility rating without spending energy. If the target chooses to spend energy to defend (up to the rating of either their Strength or Agility), they also gain the benefit of any relevant skills, such as Athletics or Acrobatics. If the attribute test achieves 1 or 2 successes, the target is Grappled (they are Immobilized, action pool loses ?? for attacks (min. ? die), defense pool loses ? (min. ? die) when defending attacks against their PD). If the test achieves 3 or more successes, the target is instead Restrained (they are Immobilized, can only perform actions to remove this condition, and their defense pool loses ?? (min. ? die) when defending attacks against their PD). When you have a target Grappled or Restrained, you use one hand to maintain the hold, you are Slowed, and the target moves with you. You can release the grapple as a minor action. The target can use an opposed Strength (Athletics) or Agility (Acrobatics) attribute test to escape the grapple.

            Shake It Off Action With a mighty effort you break free of the spell’s debilitating effect. Add energy to your action pool make an attribute test at difficulty 8 to remove a single ongoing condition. There is no maximum amount of energy you can spend on this attempt to remove a condition. Shake It Off can only be used once per round (these uses reset when you regain energy at the start of a turn).

            Attack Actions

            Characters’ default attacks use either the Melee Attack or Ranged Attack actions. Other specialized attack actions are added through skills. Melee Attack Martial Attack Action You scramble to find a weapon, your hand closes on the heavy shaft of a rusty tire iron. As the first of the horde shambles closer, you swing down the socket, staving the decrepit creature’s brain. Attack with a melee weapon at a single target that is within your reach.

          • Spend the attack or weapon’s energy cost, and your action pool gains bonus dice equal to the weapon’s rating.
          • Add additional energy to your action pool up to your Strength rating for melee weapons (swords, spears, lances, etc) or up to your Agility rating for finesse weapons (daggers, rapiers, etc). Unarmed melee attacks may use either your Strength or Agility rating to determine the additional energy you can add to your action pool.
          • Gain bonus dice to your action pool if you have any relevant skills.
          • Externalities are applied to the action pool. Make a martial melee attack (action pool vs PD) at a target within your reach. The attack deals 1 damage for each success. The damage type depends on the weapon: slashing, bludgeoning, or piercing.

            Ranged Attack Martial Attack Action A strangled scream reaches you- your companion struggles to hold back another of the creatures as it claws and bites at him. Desperate, you throw the tire iron. It tumbles awkwardly through the air. The spinning chisel end punches through brittle bone, skewering the creature’s skull against the wall. Attack with a ranged weapon at a single target that is within your weapon’s range and that you have line of sight to.

          • Spend the attack or weapon’s energy cost, and your action pool gains bonus dice equal to the weapon’s rating.
          • Add additional energy to your action pool up to your Agility rating for projectile weapons (bow, slings, crossbows, or firearms) or up to your Strength rating for thrown weapons (spears, javelins, or grenades).
          • Gain bonus dice to your action pool if you have any relevant skills.
          • Externalities are applied to the action pool. Make a martial ranged attack (action pool vs PD) at a target within range of your ranged weapon. The attack deals 1 damage for each success. The damage type depends on the weapon: bludgeoning or piercing.

            Movement Actions

            In the case of movement in combat, energy is channeled through character’s Move and Run actions to achieve the total distance that the player needs their character to move. The character’s movement speed applies across an entire round, so characters can split their movement around other actions. Move Action Years of formwork flow as you step through the mass of enemies. You cut left, step step, slice right, forward again, slice upwards, and finally step clear of the falling foes. Spend ? to move 5’. Standing from Prone is 10’ of movement (??). Obstacles, rough terrain, and moving while Prone require you to spend an extra ? for each 5’.

            Run Action You sprint through the melee, desperately hoping to avoid the flashing swords, splashing blood, and flying limbs. Spend ? to run 10’. While running, you cannot use reactions (such as Dodge) until you next take an action, and you cannot run through obstacles or rough terrain. Running extends your movement speed by 5’ for each ? you spend running.

            Reactions

            Characters also have reactions that they can use to react to another’s action: Dodge Reaction You dodge aside, turning a certain fatal blow into a glancing one instead. When defending an attack against your PD by an attacker you can perceive, add energy to your PD pool, up to your Agility rating.

            Attribute Test (Reaction) Reaction The brute’s arms clinch you. Immediately, you drop down to escape the grasp. When you are the target of an opposed attribute test, such as a grapple or trip, you can defend with dice equal to your Strength or Agility rating without spending energy. Alternatively, if you spend energy to defend (up to the rating of your relevant attribute), you gain the benefit of any relevant skills, such as Athletics or Acrobatics.

            Glossary
          • Action: Actions include attacks, minor actions, reactions, movement, and attribute tests.
          • Action Pool: The group of dice built for an attack, magic spell or attribute test.
          • Add: Move dice to an energy pool to an action or defense pool.
          • Adjacent (two targets): Standing within 5’ of each other.
          • Adjacent (three or more targets): Without gaps between the targets (i.e. an unbroken line can be traced between all of the targets).
          • Adventure: A series of encounters that are linked together into a continuous story.
          • Ally/Allies: Allies are the other creatures, adventurers or game characters who fight on the same side as the character (but not the character itself).
          • Arc (90?): Effect area, which extends from the character out to the radius or range, but its angle is constrained to 90?.
          • Arc (180?): Effect area, which extends from the character out to the radius or range, but its angle is constrained to 180?.
          • Assign: To allocate dice to a single target.
          • Attack: A melee, ranged, thrown, or magic attack action.
          • Attacker: The character that has made the attack.
          • Attribute Test: An attribute test, including the relevant attribute and difficulty.
          • Aura: Ongoing radial effect area that is centered on a character. A character can only have one active aura.
          • Aware Of: Your senses are able to clearly perceive an object or character.
          • Bloodied: When a character’s current health is at or below half its maximum health.
          • Bludgeoning: A type of damage caused by a weapon or projectile that causes blunt-force trauma to a target.
          • Bonus: Any modifier that adds dice to a pool.
          • Caster: The character who is using the spell.
          • Character: Any entity, including all player characters and game characters.
          • Combat Encounter: A single combat engagement.
          • Combatant: Anyone in the combat, including allies, enemies, and unaligned.
          • Condition: Adverse or beneficial effects that impose penalties or advantages on characters.
          • Contiguous: Without gaps between the targets (i.e. an unbroken line can be traced between all of the targets).
          • Cover: A target has cover if there is an obstacle between them and their attacker but line of sight is not totally obstructed (such as by a solid wall). Cover grants bonus dice to the target’s defense pool.
          • Creature: Another term for a character, usually refers to a non-human character.
          • Critical Fail: An attack or attribute test roll that is unsuccessful (none of the dice are equal or higher than the highest die rolled in the defense pool or the difficult target) and where at least half of the dice roll 1s.
          • Damage: Physical or mental trauma that is deducted from the target’s health.
          • Day: The period of time between long rests, usually starting at dawn.
          • Dealer: The character that has made the attack.
          • Defense: The specific defense being targeted (PD or MD).
          • Defense Pool: The group of 10-sided dice built to roll in defense of an attack.
          • Defenses: Both of the character’s defenses (PD, MD).
          • Distribute: To allocate dice to one or more targets, not necessarily evenly.
          • Effect: A condition or spell effect.
          • Encounter: A single challenge in the game; combat, trap, adversarial game character, puzzle, or non-trivial attribute test.
          • End of Turn: A character’s end of turn occurs when the player declares an end of all of their actions. This triggers any end of turn effects, and is immediately followed by their next Start of Turn, where they regain energy.
          • Energy: Each character’s capacity for action.
          • Energy Pool: The character’s pool of energy, from which they draw to perform actions and reactions.
          • Enemy/Enemies: Monsters, adversaries, creatures, adventurers, villains, or game characters who fight in opposition to the character.
          • Engaged: A character is engaged if they within the reach of an enemy other than the attacker and that enemy can take actions.
          • Equipment: Equipment grants extra abilities or extra advantages in specific situations.
          • Expend: Set aside energy from an energy pool to activate an action or reaction. This energy is not recovered until rest.
          • Externalities: Situational advantages and disadvantages that affect attack and defense pools by increasing or decreasing the dice pool.
          • Gain: Bonus dice from skills, equipment, and externalities are ‘gained’ to an action or defense pool.
          • Game Character: Allies, enemies, and bystanders who inhabit the game world and are controlled by the GM.
          • Game Master (GM): The game master, responsible for running the game, narrative scenes, challenging the players.
          • Health: The character’s ability to absorb physical and mental trauma.
          • Healing: Special skills, equipment, and rest can recover a character’s lost health.
          • Hit: An attack roll that is successful (at least one of its dice is equal or higher than the highest die rolled in the target’s defense pool).
          • Initiative: The order that player characters act in each round and have priority for their actions, from highest to lowest.
          • Line of Sight: Ranged and magic attacks require the attacker to be able to see their target. If the target is partially obstructed, they may have cover.

            • Long Rest: A long rest that recovers all health and expended energy.
            • Magic: Meta-physical abilities that require a trait and a trained skill.
            • Martial: Physical skills and actions.
            • Melee: Hand-to-hand combat, and the type of weapons designed for such combat.
            • Melee Range: Within the melee range of the character’s weapon.
            • Miss: An attack roll that is unsuccessful (none of the attacker’s dice are equal or higher than the highest die rolled in the defense pool).
            • Monster: Another term for a character, usually a non-human character.
            • Obstacle: Terrain features that hinder movement and may provide cover.
            • Off-Hand: Character’s secondary hand, used for shield, two-handed weapons, alternate weapons, or equipment.
            • Once Per Turn: Actions that can be used once per turn reset at the start of the character’s turn.
            • Other: Anyone except for the character using the power or spell.
            • Origin: The starting location of an action or effect. If using a grid, this is the centre of a 5’x5’ square.
            • Overlap: Character’s line of sight must pass through the closest target and all subsequent targets.
            • Penalty: Any externality that decreases the number of dice in a pool.
            • Perceive: The character can see, hear, or otherwise clearly sense (such as with blindsight or tremor-sense) their target.
            • Piercing: A type of damage caused by a weapon or projectile that can enter and pass through the body of a target.
            • Player Character: A character in the game that is controlled by a player.
            • Pool: The group of 10-sided dice built for an action or defense.
            • Position: The area occupied by a character.
            • Prone: The character is lying on the ground (or otherwise vulnerable).
            • Pull: Target is moved in a straight line toward the originating character (including diagonally if using a grid).
            • Push: Target is moved in a straight line away from the originating character (including diagonally if using a grid).
            • Radius: Area of a spell’s effect, counted in 5’ increments from the caster, but not including the spell’s origin. Thus, a 5’ radius spell has a diameter of 15’.
            • Range: The distance at which a spell can reach a target or where the effect area can be centered.
            • Ranged: Projectile combat, and the type of weapons designed for such combat.
            • Ranged Weapon Range: Within the furthest range increment of the character’s ranged weapon (penalties may apply).
            • Reach: The distance that characters can touch or attack a target with a melee attack.
            • Recover: Remove damage or expended energy to increase your current health or energy pool.
            • Regain (Energy): Replenish the energy in your energy pool.
            • Rest: Short and long rests allow characters to recover health and expended energy.
            • Round: 5-10 seconds. All player characters, game characters and monsters have a turn during a round.
            • Self: The character casting the spell.
            • Short Rest: A short rest that recovers some health and expended energy.
            • Slashing: A type of damage caused by a weapon or projectile that cuts laterally across a target.
            • Slung: The character’s easily accessible equipment.
            • Spend: Use dice from an energy pool to utilize equipment or instigate an action.
            • Split: To evenly share dice among multiple targets.
            • Start of Turn: A character’s start of turn occurs at the start of combat and immediately after the player declares their end of turn during combat. This triggers any start of turn effects, including regaining energy.
            • Success: An attribute test roll that is successful (one or more of its dice is equal or higher than the test’s difficulty or the highest die rolled in the target’s defense pool).
            • Target: A valid target, such as a location, a physical object, or a character.
            • Target(s): The target or targets of an attack or magic spell. Usually allies or enemies, but creative players might try to target non-combatants or inanimate objects (GM discretion applies here).
            • Touch: A target close enough to be touched (usually within 5’).
            • Turn: The time between character’s initiative in each round and their initiative on the following round.
            • Unaware: The target is not aware of the position of the character, such as through invisibility or stealth.
            • Undead: Character’s with the trait ‘Undead’.
            • Wield: The character’s currently held weapon or equipment.
            • Wield (off-hand): Equipment held in the character’s non-dominant hand.
            • Worn: A piece of clothing or equipment (other than armor) currently worn by the character.
            • You: The character who is using the action or reaction.

              Game Content

              Traits

              The traits divided into multiple categories. The first categories cover the standard traits required for all characters:

              • Species traits
              • Size traits

              Following those are further trait categories covering characters’ other inherent aspects:

              • Attribute traits
              • Damage traits
              • Magic traits
              • Mental traits
              • Movement traits
              • Physical traits
              • Sensory traits

              Species Trait – Default Human Trait: 0 CP You are a human. You have this trait:

              • Medium Additionally, you have one of these traits (select one during character creation):

                • Muscular
                • Lithe
                • Vigorous
                • Sensitive
                • Incisive
                • Astute

                Species Traits – Fantasy Dwarf Trait: 0 CP You are a dwarf. You have these traits:

                • Small
                • Sturdy
                • Dark Vision

                Elf Trait: 0 CP You are an elf. You have these traits:

                • Medium
                • Lean
                • Dark Vision
                • Acute Vision

                Halfling Trait: 0 CP You are a halfling. You have these traits:

                • Small
                • Lithe

                Half-Elf Trait: 0 CP You are a half-elf. You have these traits:

                • Medium
                • Lean
                • Lithe
                • Low-Light Vision

                Half-Orc Trait: 0 CP You are a half-orc. You have these traits:

                • Medium
                • Sturdy
                • Uncoordinated
                • Low-Light Vision

                Lizard-Kin Trait: 0 CP You are a lizard-kin. You have these traits:

                • Medium
                • Hide
                • Tail
                • Uncoordinated
                • Obtuse Orc Trait: 0 CP You are an orc. You have these traits:

                  • Large
                  • Dark Vision
                  • Uncoordinated Additionally, you have one of these traits (select one during character creation):

                    • Insensitive
                    • Obtuse
                    • Dull

                    Tengu Trait: 0 CP You are a tengu. You have these traits:

                    • Medium
                    • Lean
                    • Obtuse
                    • Flyer

                    Species Traits – Sci-Fi Android Trait: 0 CP You are an android (artificial human). You have these traits:

                    • Medium
                    • Insensitive
                    • Incisive
                    • Sturdy

                    Bot Trait: 0 CP You are a bot (small hoverdroid). You have these traits:

                    • Tiny
                    • Lean
                    • Feeble
                    • Repulsor

                    Cyborg Trait: 0 CP You are a cyborg (human/robot hybrid). You have these traits:

                    • Medium
                    • Carapace You have one of these traits (select one during character creation):

                      • Lean
                      • Uncoordinated
                      • Feeble And you have one of these traits (select one during character creation):

                        • Insensitive
                        • Obtuse
                        • Dull

                        Felinian Trait: 0 CP You are a felinian (humanoid cat-like alien species). You have these traits:

                        • Medium
                        • Lean
                        • Lithe
                        • Claws

                        Insectoid Trait: 0 CP You are an insectoid (humanoid insect-like alien species). You have these traits:

                        • Medium
                        • Carapace
                        • Scrawny
                        • Dull

                        Kurgian Trait: 0 CP You are a kurgian (humanoid warrior alien species). You have these traits:

                        • Medium
                        • Muscular
                        • Sturdy Additionally, you have two of these traits (select two during character creation):

                          • Insensitive
                          • Obtuse
                          • Dull
                          Pandian Trait: 0 CP You are a pandian (humanoid bear-like alien species). You have these traits:

                          • Large
                          • Insensitive
                          • Dull
                          • Hide
                          Robot Trait: 0 CP You are a robot (humanoid electronic/mechanical construct). You have these traits:

                          • Medium
                          • Uncoordinated
                          • Insensitive
                          • Hide
                          • Heat-Vision
                          Titanian Trait: 0 CP You are a titanian (humanoid large alien species). You have these traits:

                          • Large
                          • Uncoordinated
                          Vulusian Trait: 0 CP You are a vulusian (humanoid analytical alien species). You have these traits:

                          • Medium
                          • Astute
                          Xin Trait: 0 CP You are a xin (sentient energy field alien species). You have these traits:

                          • Tiny
                          • Lean
                          • Feeble
                          • Obtuse
                          • Particulate
                          Size Traits Fine Trait: 6 CP You are 6-12? tall (15-30cm). Your maximum health is 1 plus your Stamina rating. Your movement speed is 20’. Your reach is 5’. You gain ??? bonus dice to your PD when defending physical non-area attacks and to Agility (Stealth) tests. However, your Strength and Stamina ratings cannot be higher than ??. Armor adds a maximum of ? to your PD.

                          Diminutive Trait: 4 CP You are 1-2’ tall (30-60cm). Your maximum health is 2 plus your Stamina rating. Your movement speed is 20’. Your reach is 5’. You gain ?? bonus dice to your PD when defending physical non-area attacks and to Agility (Stealth) tests. However, your Strength and Stamina ratings cannot be higher than ???. Armor adds a maximum of ?? to your PD.

                          Tiny Trait: 2 CP You are 2-3’ tall (60-90cm). Your maximum health is 3 plus your Stamina rating. Your movement speed is 25’. Your reach is 5’. You gain ? bonus dice to your PD when defending physical non-area attacks and to Agility (Stealth) tests. However, your Strength and Stamina ratings cannot be higher than ????. Armor adds a maximum of ??? to your PD.

                          Small Trait: 0 CP You are 3-5’ tall (90cm-1.5m). Your maximum health is 2 plus twice your Stamina rating. Your movement speed is 25’. Your reach is 5’. You gain ? bonus dice to Agility (Stealth) tests.

                          Medium Trait: Default You are 5-7’ tall (1.5-2.1m). Your maximum health is 3 plus twice your Stamina rating. Your movement speed is 30’. Your reach is 5’.

                          Large Trait: 4 CP You are 7-10’ tall (2.1-3m). Your maximum health is 5 plus twice your Stamina rating. Your movement speed is 30’. Your reach is 5’. You gain ? bonus die to Strength-based actions and attacks.

                          Huge Trait: 8 CP You are 10-20’ tall (3-6m). Your maximum health is 10 plus twice your Stamina rating. Your movement speed is 35’. Your reach is 10’. You occupy a 10×10’ space. You gain ?? bonus dice to Strength-based actions and attacks. When you take a short rest, you recover health equal to 5 + your Stamina rating.

                          Gargantuan Trait: 12 CP You are 20-30’ tall (6-9m). Your maximum health is 15 plus twice your Stamina rating. Your movement speed is 40’. Your reach is 10’. You occupy a 10×10’ space. You gain ??? bonus dice to Strength-based actions and attacks. When you take a short rest, you recover health equal to 10 + your Stamina rating.

                          Colossal Trait: 16 CP You are 30-50’ tall (9-15m). Your maximum health is 20 plus three times your Stamina rating. Your movement speed is 45’. Your reach is 15’. You occupy a 15×15’ space. You gain ???? bonus dice to Strength-based actions and attacks. When you take a short rest, you recover health equal to 10 + twice your Stamina rating.

                          Titanic Trait: 20 CP You are 50-100’ tall (15-30m). Your maximum health is 30 plus four times your Stamina rating. Your movement speed is 50’. Your reach is 15’. You occupy a 20×20’ space. You gain ????? bonus dice to Strength-based actions and attacks. When you take a short rest, you recover health equal to 15 + twice your Stamina rating.

                          Attribute Traits

                          Strength Muscular Trait: 3 CP You gain muscle quickly. The CP cost of each Strength rating improvement is reduced by 1.

                          Lean Trait: -1 CP You gain muscle slowly. The CP cost of each Strength rating improvement is increased by 1.

                          Agility Lithe Trait: 3 CP You are flexible. The CP cost of each Agility rating improvement is reduced by 1.

                          Uncoordinated Trait: -1 CP You are uncoordinated. The CP cost of each Agility rating improvement is increased by 1.

                          Stamina Vigorous Trait: 3 CP You are physically fit. The CP cost of each Stamina rating improvement is reduced by 1.

                          Feeble Trait: -1 CP You are physically unfit. The CP cost of each Stamina rating improvement is increased by 1.

                          Influence Sensitive Trait: 3 CP You are very sensitive The CP cost of each Influence rating improvement is reduced by 1.

                          Insensitive Trait: -1 CP You are insensitive. The CP cost of each Influence rating improvement is increased by 1.

                          Intelligence Astute Trait: 3 CP You are a fast learner. The CP cost of each Intelligence rating improvement is reduced by 1.

                          Obtuse Trait: -1 CP You are a slow learner. The CP cost of each Intelligence rating improvement is increased by 1.

                          Acuity Incisive Trait: 3 CP You are attuned to the world around you. The CP cost of each Acuity rating improvement is reduced by 1.

                          Dull Trait: -1 CP You are not well attuned to the world around you. The CP cost of each Acuity rating improvement is increased by 1.

                          Damage Traits

                          Damage Resistance Acid Resistant Trait: 4 CP You are unusually resistant to acid damage. You take half damage from acid (round up).

                          Bludgeoning Resistant Trait: 4 CP You are unusually resistant to bludgeoning damage. You take half damage from bludgeoning (round up).

                          Cold Resistant Trait: 4 CP You are unusually resistant to cold damage. You take half damage from cold (round up).

                          Fire Resistant Trait: 4 CP You are unusually resistant to fire damage. You take half damage from fire (round up).

                          Piercing Resistant Trait: 4 CP You are unusually resistant to piercing damage. You take half damage from piercing (round up).

                          Poison Resistant Trait: 4 CP You are unusually resistant to poison damage. You take half damage from poison (round up).

                          Shock Resistant Trait: 4 CP You are unusually resistant to electricity damage. You take half damage from electricity (round up).

                          Slashing Resistant Trait: 4 CP You are unusually resistant to slashing damage. You take half damage from slashing (round up).

                          Damage Immunity Acid Proof Trait: 10 CP You are completely immune to acid damage. You take no damage from acid.

                          Bludgeoning Proof Trait: 10 CP You are completely immune to bludgeoning damage. You take no damage from bludgeoning.

                          Cold Proof Trait: 10 CP You are completely immune to cold damage. You take no damage from cold.

                          Fire Proof Trait: 10 CP You are completely immune to fire damage. You take no damage from fire.

                          Piercing Proof Trait: 10 CP You are completely immune to piercing damage. You take no damage from piercing.

                          Poison Proof Trait: 10 CP You are completely immune to poison damage. You take no damage from poison.

                          Shock Proof Trait: 10 CP You are completely immune to electricity damage. You take no damage from electricity.

                          Slashing Proof Trait: 10 CP You are completely immune to slashing damage. You take no damage from slashing.

                          Magic Traits

                          These traits each represent a school of magic, and give access to magic skills of that school as well as cantrip magic skills. Anima Caster Trait: 2 CP You are an animist who can train Animist Magic and Cantrip Magic skills. You must have a free hand to use a magic skill.

                          Arcane Caster Trait: 2 CP You are an arcanist who can train Arcanist Magic and Cantrip Magic skills. You must have a free hand to use a magic skill.

                          Divine Caster Trait: 2 CP You are a divinist who can train Divine Magic and Cantrip Magic skills. You must have a free hand to use a magic skill.

                          Mystical Caster Trait: 2 CP You are a mystic who can train Mystical Magic and Cantrip Magic skills. You must have a free hand to use a magic skill.

                          Necromancy Caster Trait: 2 CP You are a necromancer who can train Necromancy Magic and Cantrip Magic skills. You must have a free hand to use a magic skill.

                          Pyromancy Caster Trait: 2 CP You are a pyromancer who can train Pyromancy Magic and Cantrip Magic skills. You must have a free hand to use a magic skill.

                          Summoner Caster Trait: 2 CP You are a summoner who can train Summoning Magic and Cantrip Magic skills. You must have a free hand to use a magic skill.

                          Telekinesis Caster Trait: 2 CP You are a telekineticist who can train Telekinesis Magic and Cantrip Magic skills. You must have a free hand to use a magic skill.

                          Mental Traits

                          These mental traits each represent an inherent aspect of the character’s three mental attributes. Note, mental traits are separate from the sensory traits, and magic traits and skills. Eidetic Memory Trait: 2 CP You can recall and visualize small details from memory. You gain ?? bonus dice when making Intelligence tests where this trait is beneficial.

                          Empathic Trait: 5 CP You are sensitive to the thoughts and intentions of sentient characters within 30’. You gain ?? bonus dice to Acuity (Perception) or Acuity (Insight) tests where this trait is beneficial.

                          Hive-Mind Trait: -1 CP You have collective consciousness. Your Intelligence rating cannot be higher than ?. You can connect to other Hive-Mind consciousnesses that are within 10’ of you. When making attribute tests based on Intelligence, your Intelligence rating is effectively ? higher for each other consciousness that you are connected to.

                          Telepathy Trait: 5 CP You can communicate telepathically with other sentient characters within 30’. You must share a language to communicate, the target must be willing, and you must have made physical contact with the target before attempting telepathic communication.

                          Movement Traits

                          These traits reflect ways of moving other than bipedal locomotion. Climber Trait: 3 CP You can climb. You can climb vertical and overhanging surfaces using your normal Move and Run actions at your normal movement speed.

                          Flyer Trait: 7 CP You can fly. Your movement speed becomes flying speed. When flying, you can spend ?? energy to gain 5’, of altitude or ? energy to hover. Each turn you are above the ground and do not hover or gain height, you fall. When falling, you lose 5’ of altitude in the first round, then 10’, then 15’, etc.

                          Jumper Trait: 3 CP You can leap long distances. Spend ? energy for each 5’ you jump. You can jump 5’ for each Strength rating.

                          Phaser Trait: 10 CP You can teleport. Spend ? energy for each 5’ to teleport to a location you can see and your path is unobstructed.

                          Quadruped Trait: 3 CP You move on four legs. You can traverse rough terrain without penalty.

                          Repulsor Trait: 5 CP You hover above the ground. You can hover above rough terrain without penalty.

                          Physical Traits

                          These traits represent the character’s physical aspects that are not covered by the standard physical attributes (Strength, Stamina, and Agility). Ambidextrous Trait: 2 CP You are able to use your left and right hands equally well. You can ignore any penalties that apply when using equipment in your off-hand.

                          Bite Trait: 3 CP You have sharp teeth. You do not need arms to make an unarmed melee attack. You can make an unarmed melee attack with your bite for ??/?.

                          Carapace Trait: 7 CP You have hard keratin scales, an armored shell, or a carapace. You gain ?? to your PD. When you wear armor with a rating equal or lower than the PD benefit of this trait, the armor instead grants ? to your PD. When you wear armor with a rating higher than the PD benefit of this trait, the armor grants ? fewer dice.

                          Claws Trait: 2 CP You have claws or talons growing from your hands. You can make an unarmed melee attack with your claws for ??/??.

                          Exoskeleton Trait: 12 CP You have a hard armor exoskeleton. You gain ??? to your PD. When you wear armor with a rating equal or lower than the PD benefit of this trait, the armor instead grants ? to your PD. When you wear armor with a rating higher than the PD benefit of this trait, the armor grants ? fewer dice.

                          Hide Trait: 3 CP You have hardened skin, protective plates, resistant scales, or thick hide. You gain ? to your PD. When you wear armor with a rating higher than the PD benefit of this trait, the armor grants ? fewer dice.

                          Horns Trait: 0 CP You have horns, tusks, or bone ridges growing from your head.

                          Particulate Trait: 8 CP You are made of tiny discrete particles (energy, magic, plasma, ether, nano-bots, swarms, etc). “You can squeeze through small spaces. When defending non-area martial attacks, you gain ?? bonus dice to your PD. You cannot wear, wield, sling, or carry equipment.

                          Scrawny Trait: -1 CP You are weak. Your Stamina rating is effectively 1 less when calculating your maximum health.

                          Sturdy Trait: 3 CP You are tough. Your Stamina rating is effectively 1 more when calculating your maximum health.

                          Tail Trait: 4 CP You have a tail. You can make an unarmed melee attack with your tail for ???/???.

                          Venomous Trait: 3 CP Your attacks can poison targets. When you deal damage with an unarmed melee attack, the target must make a Stamina (Resist) test at difficulty 7 or become Poisoned. If your attack deals 3 or more damage, then the difficulty increases to 8. Once each turn, the Poisoned character can make a Stamina (Resist) test at difficulty 10 without spending energy. If they succeed, they are no longer Poisoned.

                          Sensory Traits Acute Hearing Trait: 2 CP You can hear very well. You gain ?? bonus dice to Acuity (Perception) tests where this trait is beneficial.

                          Acute Smell Trait: 2 CP You can smell very well. You gain ?? bonus dice to Acuity (Perception) tests where this trait is beneficial.

                          Acute Taste Trait: 1 CP You can taste very well. You gain ?? bonus dice to Acuity (Perception) tests where this trait is beneficial.

                          Acute Vision Trait: 3 CP You can see very well. You gain ?? bonus dice to Acuity (Perception) tests where this trait is beneficial.

                          Dark Vision Trait: 3 CP You can see equally well in lit, low-light, and dark conditions within 30’. You can ignore penalties for darkness or low-light situations as long as there are no sources of light (such as a lantern or bulb) nearby.

                          Echo-Sense Trait: 3 CP You can use echo-location to determine location of solid objects within 30’. You gain ?? bonus dice to Acuity (Perception) tests where this trait is beneficial.

                          Heat Vision Trait: 4 CP You can see into the infra-red spectrum, allowing you to see heat from living characters and residual heat on objects and surfaces within 30’. You gain ?? bonus dice to Acuity (Perception) tests where this trait is beneficial.

                          Low-Light Vision Trait: 2 CP You can see equally well in lit and in low-light conditions within 60’. You can ignore penalties for low-light situations as long as there are no sources of light (such as a lantern or bulb) nearby.

                          Tremor-Sense Trait: 3 CP You can detect vibrations within 30’. You gain ?? bonus dice to Acuity (Perception) tests where this trait is beneficial.

                          General Skills

                          General Skill Rules

                          As described in the Skills section on page 17, all skills have a number of common rules that ” for the sake of brevity ” are not duplicated in each skill description:

                          • You gain bonus dice equal to your attribute rating, up to the skill’s rating.
                          • In combat situations where energy is employed, the number of dice gained also cannot be higher than the added energy (which, in turn, can’t be higher than the underlying attribute).

                            Skills Summary

                            This list represents a core set of skills.

                            Strength:

                            • Athletics
                            • Intimidation

                            Influence:

                            • Deception
                            • Leadership
                            • Perform
                            • Persuasion
                            • Seduction

                            Agility:

                            • Acrobatics
                            • Crafting
                            • Drive
                            • Ride
                            • Stealth
                            • Thievery

                            Intelligence:

                            • Arcane
                            • Engineering
                            • History
                            • Investigation
                            • Knowledge
                            • Language
                            • Medicine

                            Stamina:

                            • Endurance
                            • Resist

                            Acuity:

                            • Animal Handling
                            • First Aid
                            • Insight
                            • Perception
                            • Survival

                            Strength Skills

                            Athletics Skill You crash through the makeshift fences, splintering rotten wood and scattering corrugated iron. Behind you, you hear the heavy footfalls of the newcomer, and the thing with it, pursuing you. Gain bonus dice when making Strength (Athletics) tests to run, jump, swim, climb, or force your way through obstacles for a short period of time. Longer challenges require a Stamina (Endurance) test.

                            Intimidation Skill

                            You step toe-to-toe with the greedy slaver and loom over him… Gain bonus dice when making Strength (Intimidation) tests to convince another character to bend to your will through the implied threat of force. Strength (Intimidation) tests are opposed with Strength (Intimidation), or subverted with Influence (Deception).

                            Agility Skills

                            Acrobatics Skill You sprint through the maze of shanty buildings, following the crashing and thumping of the native. You flick your hand at your hunting hound, and it breaks to the right. You bound over low fences, assisted by the low gravity of this dismal planet. Gain bonus dice when making Agility (Acrobatics) tests to make acrobatic maneuvers that rely on maneuverability, avoidance, balance, and manual dexterity.

                            Crafting Skill

                            The wooden box is beautiful. The lid is inlaid with slivers of precious metals, shells, painted porcelain. The box rattles as you move it, some hidden mechanism is broken inside. You pull down your magnifying glass and get to work to unlock its secrets. Gain bonus dice when making Agility (Crafting) tests to create or repair a craft item.

                            Drive Skill

                            You clamber into the tight driver’s seat of the huge M1. The controls are unfamiliar, but you soon find the transmission and throttle controls, and get the beast moving. Gain bonus dice when making Agility (Drive) tests to ride, drive, pilot, or fly a bike, car, cart, boat, airplane, or similar vehicle.

                            Ride Skill

                            You run from the saloon to the wide verandah. In the distance, a train whistle shrieks. You grab the reins of the nearest horse ” a bright-eyed palomino ” and leap onto it. Gain bonus dice when making Agility (Ride) tests to ride an animal mount.

                            Stealth Skill

                            You press up against the stone wall as the noise and vibration grows. Your lips curl into a snarl. Girl’s hand touches you, reassuring, and you relax and stay quiet. Gain bonus dice when making Agility (Stealth) tests to avoid detection. Agility (Stealth) tests are opposed with Acuity (Perception).

                            Thievery Skill

                            The parlor magician gives a wide grin, his empty hands outstretched. With a flick of his wrists, a fan of cards miraculously appears in each of his hands. Gain bonus dice when making Agility (Thievery) tests to overcome mundane physical security, palm a small item, pick a pocket, or bypass a mechanical lock. Agility (Thievery) tests are opposed with Acuity (Perception).

                            Stamina Skills Endurance Skill The stranded explorers and indigenous fauna run, en mass, from the ravenous beast. Their only chance at survival is to outlast the giant worm’s appetite. Gain bonus dice when making Stamina (Endurance) tests to undertake physical exertion for an extended time, such as running, swimming, or holding your breath. For longer time periods, this also covers sleep deprivation, dehydration, or starvation.

                            Resist Skill She pauses, unsteady, then slams the shot glass down onto the table with a smile. Gain bonus dice when making Stamina (Resist) tests to imbibe alcohol (or similar intoxicants), survive poison, defy tear gas, or overcome illness or disease.

                            Influence Skills Deception Skill‚ Of course I love you, she murmured. Gain bonus dice when making Influence (Deception) tests to lie, deceive, or alter your appearance. Influence (Deception) tests are opposed with Acuity (Insight).

                            Leadership Skill‚ Today, my kin, will reveal our true selves. The spirits of our ancestors watch over us. And if we are brave, and we fall, we will join them in the halls of Valhalla.? Gain bonus dice when making Influence (Leadership) tests to influence the actions of a group of characters. Influence (Leadership) tests can be subverted with Acuity (Insight), or opposed with Influence (Persuasion) or Strength (Intimidation).

                            Perform Skill A glance confirmed that her accomplices were ready, so she struck her opening chord. Gain bonus dice when making Influence (Perform) tests to entertain, deport, or appeal with storytelling, oratory, song, antics, dance, dress, manners, style, or acting.

                            Persuasion Skill‚ The price is the price, she growls. Gain bonus dice when making Influence (Persuasion) tests to reach an agreement with another character, where your goals are not aligned with theirs. Influence (Persuasion) tests can be opposed with Influence (Persuasion) or Strength (Intimidation).

                            Seduction Skill‚ Of course I love you, he mumbled. Gain bonus dice when making Influence (Seduction) tests to seduce another character. Influence (Seduction) tests can be subverted with Acuity (Insight), or opposed with Influence (Perform) or Influence (Persuasion).

                            Intelligence Skills Arcane Skill You blow the dust from the heavy book. The binding is thick, slightly pliable, maybe leather. The spine creaks as you open it, revealing pages packed with dense symbols. Gain bonus dice when making Intelligence (Arcana) tests to understand the arcane or occult, to discern a magical effect, or to know the uses of magical components.

                            Engineering Skill The enginner supervised the work, first selecting the tallest and straightest trees, then the sawing and preparing beams, then forming and constructing the massive weapon. Gain bonus dice when making Intelligence (Engineering) tests to understand the strengths and weaknesses of a structure and to design a robust structure.

                            History Skill‚ The fortress is not well-documented, he mumbles,‚ but its earliest castlelain kept a diary, of sorts, and in it he made reference to a secret postern gate, hidden from all.? Gain bonus dice when making Intelligence (History) tests to know the history of a particular location, people, or era.

                            Investigation Skill The stolen data-cube reveals years of records. You get to work sifting through them, searching for the proverbial needle in the haystack. Gain bonus dice when making Intelligence (Investigation) tests to work out the relationship between disparate pieces of information, to notice small details, or to search a location.

                            Knowledge Skill You tear open the flimsy cabinet door, and examine the bottles and other items. You grab what you need, gloves, bleach, drain cleaner, a plastic tub. Gain bonus dice when making Intelligence (Knowledge) tests about a specific subject. This skill can be trained for common knowledge or multiple discrete specialties, such as agriculture, architecture, bureaucracy, electronics, law, law enforcement, mathematics, military strategy, science, technology, etc:

                            • Intelligence (Knowledge: Common)
                            • Intelligence (Knowledge: Law Enforcement)
                            • Intelligence (Knowledge: Cryptography)
                            • Language Skill‚ Donde esta la biblioteca?? Gain bonus dice when making Intelligence (Language) tests to read, write, or speak in a specific language. This skill can be taken multiple times for separate languages:

                              • Intelligence (Language: Native)
                              • Intelligence (Language: Latin)
                              • Intelligence (Language: Orcish)

                                Medicine Skill‚ Bite down on this, says the blood-soaked doctor, offering a stout piece of wood. Gain bonus dice when making Intelligence (Medicine) tests to treat wounds or injuries.

                                Acuity Skills Animal Handling Skill The horse whines, digs clods of earth with agitated hooves. You approach cautiously, holding out your hand, and speak to calm the animal. Gain bonus dice when making Acuity (Animal Handling) tests to control the behavior of an animal.

                                First-Aid Skill‚ Medic!? In the cacophony of the bombardment, a solider leaps into the foxhole. Gain bonus dice when making Acuity (First-Aid) tests to treat wounds or injuries.

                                Insight Skill The gambler’s grip on his cards tightens. Opposite, the card sharp smirks. Gain bonus dice when making Acuity (Insight) tests to understand the motivations, intent, emotions, and needs of another character. Acuity (Insight) tests are opposed with Influence (Deception).

                                Perception Skill You catch a flicker of movement deep in the shadows inside the decrepit building. You slow, as casually as possible. Without looking, you try to confirm the threat. Gain bonus dice when making Acuity (Perception) tests to perceive the world around you, including large details, threats, and opportunities. Acuity (Perception) tests are opposed with Agility (Stealth). Survival Skill The mountaineer gazes toward the darkening horizon.‚ Weather’s coming in, best find somewhere to bed down.? He scans the terrain, points off to a craggy escarpment. Gain bonus dice when making Acuity (Survival) tests to find food, locate shelter, cover your tracks, navigate treacherous routes, find and follow another’s trail.

                                Martial Skills

                                Martial skills are divided into basic martial skills and specialized martial skills. Basic martial skills are fundamental weapon and equipment skills. Specialized martial skills include alternate attacks, circumstantial bonuses, and new martial techniques. The basic and specialized martial skills are grouped:

                                • Basic Martial Skills ” Historical
                                • Basic Martial Skills ” Modern/Sci-Fi
                                • Specialized Martial Skills

                                Basic Martial Skills – Historical

                                The basic martial skills include:

                                • Brawling
                                • Finesse Weapons
                                • Martial Arts
                                • Melee Weapons
                                • Ranged Weapons
                                • Reach Weapons
                                • Thrown Weapons

                                There are also skills to utilize armor and shields to best effect:

                                • Armor Training
                                • Shield Training

                                Armor Training Basic Martial Strength Skill (Bonus) You thank the gods as the sword blade clangs off your sturdy armor. When wearing armor, your Strength rating and Armor Training rating must be equal to or higher than your armor’s rating, or you incur the penalties of your worn armor (including additional energy costs for actions and reactions, and reduction to your Agility rating). These penalties are detailed in the relevant equipment section.

                                Brawling Basic Martial Strength Skill (Bonus) Wading through the frenzied melee, you instinctively snap your arm up to deflect an approaching fist, then respond with a crunching right hook. When you make an unarmed melee attack using your Strength, your action pool gains ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Brawling rating.

                                Finesse Weapons Basic Martial Agility Skill (Bonus) Your blade flashes, darting in past the brute’s heavy axe, sneaking between the plates of his heavy armor, and skewering some important organ. When you make a melee attack with a finesse weapon using your Agility, your action pool gains ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Finesse Weapons rating.

                                Martial Arts Basic Martial Agility Skill (Bonus) You slide sideways and deflect the incoming blow with a raised forearm, before responding with a knife-hand to the pugilist’s face, drawing a cascade of blood. When you make an unarmed melee attack using your Agility, your action pool gains ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Martial Arts rating.

                                Melee Weapons Basic Martial Strength Skill (Bonus) You throw your shattered longsword aside and draw your back-up weapon; a short mace with a fearsome spiked head… When you make a melee attack with a melee weapon using your Strength, your action pool gains ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Melee Weapons rating.

                                Ranged Weapons Basic Martial Agility Skill (Bonus) The rider urges his mount, clods of earth spraying in the beast’s wake. You raise your bow, pull back the string, account for the wind and the target’s speed, breathe, release. The arrow soars skyward, plunges down, and strikes the rider who tumbles to the dirt. When you make a ranged attack with a ranged weapon using your Agility, your action pool gains ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Ranged Weapons rating. Range penalties and reload costs are detailed in the equipment section.

                                Reach Weapons Basic Martial Strength Skill (Bonus) You thrust the pike into the roiling mass; it punctures something fleshy. You push forwards, forcing the weapon deeper into the mass. When you make a melee attack with a reach weapon using your Strength, your action pool gains ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Reach Weapons rating.

                                Shield Training Basic Martial Strength Skill (Reaction) The first attack glances off your shield, and you have a just moment to raise it again before another blow strikes the cracked wood and bent metal. When defending an attack against your PD, you can spend energy to pay the cost of a shield you wield, and your PD pool gains bonus dice equal to your shield’s rating. Additionally, your PD pool gains bonus dice equal to the shield’s rating each subsequent time you are attacked until the start of your next turn.

                                Thrown Weapons Basic Martial Strength Skill (Bonus) Your hands blur as you snatch weighted daggers from the bandolier that crosses your chest. In the space of two breaths, three of the daggers have spun flat through the air and sunk to their hilts into the straw target. When you make a ranged attack with a thrown weapon using your Strength, your action pool gains ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Thrown Weapons rating. Range penalties and reload costs are detailed in the equipment section.

                                Basic Martial Skills – Modern/Sci-Fi Building on the historical martial skills, these modern and sci-fi martial skills reflect training required to use modern firearms and futuristic energy weapons, and the unique ways of using those weapons.
                              • Small guns
                              • Long guns
                              • Heavy weapons
                              Depending on the specific gun, they offer one or more fire modes:

                              • Single Shot
                              • Semi-Auto
                              • Burst Fire
                              • Full-Auto
                              Heavy Weapons Basic Martial Agility Skill (Bonus) The velocraft banks between the gravity-defying rock skylands. The pirate base comes into view, its platforms and hangers excavated into the vertical rock-face.‚ Light ‘em up? shouts the pilot. The gunner brings the heavy gun to bear, and pulls the triggers. When you make a ranged attack with a heavy weapon using your Agility, your action pool gains ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Heavy Weapons rating. Range penalties, reload costs, and additional specific costs and bonuses (such as weapon fire modes), are detailed in the equipment section.

                              Long Guns Basic Martial Agility Skill (Bonus) The clatter of the distant gunfire is immediately recognizable. You swivel your rifle, sighting through the scope as its aim passes mud-daub buildings and shanties. When you make a ranged attack with a long gun using your Agility, your action pool gains ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Long Guns rating. Range penalties, reload costs, and additional specific costs and bonuses (such as weapon fire modes), are detailed in the equipment section.

                              Small Guns Basic Martial Agility Skill (Bonus) You spin around, unholstering your sidearm, and squeeze off three quick shots, each of which finds its mark on your would-be ambusher. When you make a ranged attack with a small gun using your Agility, your action pool gains ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Small Guns rating. Range penalties, reload costs, and additional specific costs and bonuses (such as weapon fire modes), are detailed in the equipment section.

                              Specialized Martial Skills Aggravated Strike Specialized Martial Skill (Bonus) Your blade cuts through the air uselessly as the vile apparition becomes incoherent for a single moment. You snarl, then redouble your effort to attack again. Your attack strengthens when you attack a target you missed with your last attack. When you miss an enemy with a martial attack that only targets that enemy, your next martial attack against that enemy gains ? bonus die. Each consecutive time that you miss that enemy, you gain an additional bonus die, up to your Aggravated Strike rating.

                              Bodyguard’s Stance Specialized Martial Skill (Action) Standing in the midst of your allies, you grunt warnings, and shove them from the path of incoming attacks. You automatically assist adjacent allies who are the target of melee attacks. You can activate Bodyguard’s Stance as a minor action. While the stance is active, when an enemy attacks an adjacent ally’s PD, that ally gains ? bonus die to their PD pool. This reaction triggers once per round for each Bodyguard’s Stance rating (these uses reset when you regain energy at the start of a turn). While in this stance, you cannot gain the benefits of other specialized martial skills. You can deactivate this stance as a minor action, and the stance deactivates if you leave combat, fall unconscious, or are otherwise unable to perform actions.

                              Bodyguard’s Ward Specialized Martial Skill (Reaction) The snap of the bowstring catches your eye. The arrow streaks toward Morton, who stands flatfooted. You grab him and pull him from the path of the missile. You can help adjacent allies to defend against attacks. When an adjacent ally is the target of an attack that does not include you in its targets, you can use a reaction that would add dice to your PD pool (such as Dodge or Shield Training) to instead assign those dice to the PD pool of that adjacent ally. You can assign ? die for each Bodyguard’s Ward rating.

                              Brace Specialized Martial Skill (Reaction) You see the incoming axe and brace yourself, lessening its impact. You can use your Strength to add energy to your PD instead of your Agility. When using your Dodge action, you can use your Strength instead of your Agility to determine how much energy you can add, up to your Brace rating.

                              Charging Attack Specialized Martial Skill (Bonus) You raise your axe, let loose the battlecry of your clan, and charge into battle. You charge at your target to strengthen your attack. When you start your turn without an adjacent enemy, you can run in a straight line (paying the normal costs associated with this action) and then make a melee attack. The attack gains ? bonus die for each 5’ you have run, up to your Charging Attack rating.

                              Cleaving Attack Specialized Martial Skill (Reaction) The curved blade slices through the decrepit flesh of the first shambler, then continues its arcing sweep to bite into the second grasping horror. Your melee attack carries through to strike another enemy. When a melee attack you make resolves, you can immediately make a melee attack using the same weapon against another target within your reach. This second attack uses ? die for each energy added to the first attack, up to your Cleaving Attack rating.

                              Coherent Mind Specialized Martial Skill (Reaction) You force out the voices before their maddening screams overwhelm your senses. You can add energy to defend attacks against your mental defense. When defending an attack against your MD by a target you are aware of, you can add ? energy to your MD pool for each Influence rating, up to your Coherent Mind rating.

                              Debilitating Blow Specialized Martial Skill (Reaction) As the blow lands, you force it deeper, sending your quarry staggering backwards. When you hit an enemy with a melee attack, you can force the target to expend energy. When you damage a target with a melee attack, you can spend energy, and for each ?? you spend, the target expends ?. You can force the target to expend energy equal to the damage that was dealt, up to your Debilitating Blow rating. The target can expend spent energy instead of energy from their energy pool.

                              Defensive Stance Specialized Martial Skill (Action) You set yourself against the attacks, hoping to ride out the fusillade. You automatically defend attacks against your PD. You can activate Defensive Stance as a minor action. While the stance is active, when an enemy attacks your PD, you gain ? bonus die to your PD pool. This bonus triggers once per round for each Defensive Stance rating (these uses reset when you regain energy at the start of a turn). While in this stance, you cannot gain the benefits of other specialized martial skills. You can deactivate this stance as a minor action, and the stance deactivates if you leave combat, fall unconscious, or are otherwise unable to perform actions.

                              Deft Movement Specialized Martial Skill (Reaction) You burst from cover, and veer left and right to dodge the rain of burning debris. You can use your Dodge reaction while running. When you are attacked while running, you can add energy to use your Dodge reaction. You can add energy equal to your Agility rating, up to your Deft Movement rating.

                              Disarming Attack Specialized Martial Skill (Action) You lean forward, gripping the railing, and lean over to get a better look. Below, the two gladiators shuffle across the blood-soaked sand. The lithe combatant, tired of battering the other’s buckler, hooks his curved blade under the lip of the shield and sends it flipping through the air. Your melee attack can disarm its target instead of dealing damage. When you declare a melee attack, you can choose to have the attack disarm the target instead of dealing damage. If the target is holding their weapon or shield with two (or more) hands, then your action pool loses ?? (min. ? die). If the attack succeeds, the target’s weapon or shield is thrown away 5’ for each success. The maximum number of successes is your Disarming Attack rating.

                              Disengaging Step Specialized Martial Skill (Bonus) You quickly slip out of the fray, ducking under swinging metal and crashing shields. You gain extra dice to your PD pool when moving away from enemies. When you are the target of a melee attack while moving out of an enemy’s reach, your PD pool gains ? bonus dice up to your Disengaging Step rating.

                              Distracting Taunt Specialized Martial Skill (Action) Their eyes lock across the blood-soaked field.‚ Coward!? the accusation strikes home, its target staggers backwards. You can taunt enemies to deplete their energy. Add energy to your action pool up to your Influence rating, and you then gain bonus dice equal to your Distracting Taunt rating. You can then use these dice to make an attack against the MD of a target within 50’. If you achieve 1 or 2 successes, the target is Enervated (they only regain energy equal to their two highest attributes). If you achieve 3 or more successes, the target is Exhausted (they only regain energy equal to their single highest attribute). The target must use Shake It Off to remove the effect.

                              Dual Wield Attack Specialized Martial Skill (Reaction) The battle-scarred weapon mistress holds a wooden gladius in each hand. As the volunteers approach, she attacks quickly, striking separate targets with each sword. You attack with a second martial weapon each time you make a martial attack. When you are wielding two martial weapons that can be used with one hand, and the energy cost of the weapon in your off-hand is equal to or lower than the energy cost of your main hand weapon, you can make a dual attack. When you make a normal martial attack with your main hand weapon, you can then immediately make a second attack with your off-hand weapon, and the cost of this second attack is reduced by the energy cost of the main hand attack, up to your Dual Wield Attack rating. The energy cost of this second attack cannot be reduced to less than ?. Additionally, dual attacks made with weapons wielded in your off-hand do not suffer normal penalties associated with off-hand attacks.

                              Empty Vessel Specialized Martial Skill (Reaction) You pour your magical energy into the attack; yet he simply looks back at you with calm tranquil eyes. You can add energy to defend attacks against your MD. When defending an attack against your MD by a target you are aware of, you can add energy to your MD pool equal to your Acuity rating, up to your Empty Vessel rating.

                              Engaged Attack Specialized Martial Skill (Bonus) Distracted by the marauder’s relentless attacks, you fail to notice that another of his band has circled behind you, leaving you vulnerable to his opportunistic attack. You gain extra dice to your martial attacks when your target is distracted. When you make a martial attack at a target that is within the reach of an ally of yours and that ally can take actions, your action pool gains ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Engaged Attack rating.

                              Enraged Attacker Specialized Martial Skill (Action) The berserker wades into the fray, slashing left and right, sending gouts of blood and viscera spraying. The warrior shakes off a multitude of wounds in his crazed state. You enter a ferocious rage that strengthens your attacks. You can activate Enraged Attacker as a minor action. While enraged, when you make a physical attack based on your Strength (such as melee or thrown attacks), your action pool gains ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Enraged Attacker rating. While enraged, you cannot use reactions nor can you gain the benefits of other specialized martial skills. You can deactivate this state as a minor action, and the state deactivates if you fall unconscious or are otherwise unable to perform actions. When the enraged state ends you must immediately expend ?? energy.

                              First Strike Specialized Martial Skill (Bonus) Your brutal attack catches the conquistador by surprise, to his immediate demise. You deal additional damage if you are the first to land an attack. When you are the first to deal damage in a combat encounter, the attack deals additional damage. Your attack deals 1 extra damage for each damage dealt, up to your First Strike rating.

                              Following Attack Specialized Martial Skill (Reaction) The vandal’s shuddering blow sends you reeling backwards, and before you regain your footing, he follows with another attack. You follow up a martial attack with another attack against your target’s same defenses. When a martial attack you make resolves, you can then immediately make a second attack against the same rolled PD pool of the same target. The cost of this second attack must be equal to lower than your Following Attack rating.

                              Hard To Kill Specialized Martial Skill (Reaction) Exhausted, you somehow manage to land a solid blow ” surely a killing blow. Before you can even take a breath, the cur has shaken off the blow and redoubled his attack. You reduce the damage of an attack that would knock you out or kill you. The first time in each encounter that you are damaged by an attack that would reduce your health to 0 or less, you can reduce that damage by your Stamina rating, up to your Hard To Kill rating.

                              Initiative Specialized Martial Skill (Bonus) The squint of an eye, the tightening of her hand, the subtle shift of her foot. These signs warn you of her dangerous intent, and prepare you for her attack. You gain bonus dice when determining initiative. When determining initiative at the start of a combat encounter, you gain ? bonus dice for Agility rating, up to your Initiative rating.

                              Iron Will Specialized Martial Skill (Reaction) The armor-clad warrior steels himself, and the streaking arcane forces crash into him and scatter into trailing embers. You can add energy to defend attacks against your MD. When defending an attack against your MD by a target you are aware of, you can add energy to your MD pool equal to your Intelligence rating, up to your Iron Will rating.

                              Killing Blow Specialized Martial Skill (Reaction) Summoning last of your energy, you pour everything into a final attack. You can expend energy to gain bonus dice to a melee attack. When you declare a melee attack, you can expend ? energy and you gain ? bonus die for each Strength rating, up to your Killing Blow rating.

                              Last Gasp Specialized Martial Skill (Action) You stagger forward, almost spent. With your last reserves of energy, you launch a final attack. You can expend energy to gain bonus energy. Once per encounter, you can expend ? energy, and you gain bonus energy equal to your Stamina rating, up to your Last Gasp rating.

                              Last Resolve Specialized Martial Skill (Reaction) Your blow staggers the barbarian. The blood-soaked northerner shakes off the fresh injury and launches at you. You can expend energy to recover health. When you are damaged, you can expend energy up your Stamina, and also up to your Last Resolve rating, and you recover 1 health for each expended energy.

                              Leader’s Pledge Specialized Martial Skill (Action) You hear the voice of your liege-lord, inspiring you to action. You can spend energy to grant bonus energy to a nearby ally. When an ally within 25’ can perceive you, you can spend energy equal to your Influence, up to your Leader’s Pledge rating. That ally gains ? bonus energy for each energy spent. This bonus energy lasts until the end of the target’s next turn. Leader’s Pledge can be used once per round for each Leader’s Pledge rating, and can only be used on a target once during a round (these uses reset when you regain energy at the start of a turn).

                              Mounted Combat Specialized Martial Skill (Bonus) From your vantage atop your mount, you see another rider. The rider sits awkwardly, bouncing off the saddle with each gait. Sensing an easy scalp, you urge your beast on. You can ignore the penalties of using weapons while mounted. When riding a mount, you can ignore the energy and attribute penalties of mounted combat for weapons with a rating up to your Mounted Combat rating.

                              Nimble Defense Specialized Martial Skill (Bonus) The hulking Cimmerian’s thews tighten as he dives from the serpent’s whipping tail. You dodge more effectively when wearing light armor. When you are wearing light armor or have no armor (your PD pool is ? or ??) and you spend energy to use your Dodge action, your PD pool gains ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Nimble Defense rating.

                              Offensive Stance Specialized Martial Skill (Action) Watching you carefully, your opponent crosses his blade across his body defensively. You instinctively switch to the high guard, maximizing your attacks. Your martial attacks automatically gain bonus dice. You can activate Offensive Stance as a minor action. While the stance is active, when you make a martial attack you gain ? bonus die to your action pool for each added energy, up to your Offensive Stance rating. While in this stance, you cannot gain the benefits of other specialized martial skills. You can deactivate this stance as a minor action, and the stance deactivates if you leave combat, fall unconscious, or are otherwise unable to perform actions.

                              Opportunity Attack Specialized Martial Skill (Reaction) As the vile creature turns to run, you instinctively strike it down. You can make a melee attack at a target that moves out of your reach. When an enemy uses an action that moves them out of your reach, you can immediately make a melee attack at that target. The attack’s energy cost is reduced by your Opportunity Attack rating.

                              Parry Specialized Martial Skill (Reaction) Dripping with sweat, she tosses away her shattered shield. She stumbles back into the fight, using her sword to fend off her opponent’s attacks. You can use your wielded weapon to increase your PD pool. When you are wielding a melee weapon and you defend an attack against your PD by a target you are aware of, you can spend energy equal to the weapon’s energy cost and you gain bonus dice to your PD pool equal to the weapon’s rating, up to your Parry rating.

                              Passing Attack Specialized Martial Skill (Reaction) The Bedouin warrior slashes with his curved sword, then carries the momentum of the attack to close on his next target. You can move 5’ immediately after making a melee attack. When a melee attack you make resolves, as a reaction you can move 5’ for free. You can use this reaction once per round for reach Passing Attack rating (these uses reset when you regain energy at the start of a turn).

                              Phalanx Specialized Martial Skill (Bonus) The front line warriors crouch down and interlock their massive shields. You can lock shields with adjacent allies to increase your PD pool. When you spend energy to use a shield to increase your PD, you gain ? bonus die to your PD for each adjacent ally holding a shield, up to your Phalanx rating.

                              Pinning Attack Specialized Martial Skill (Action) Each time you move, the nimble warrior cuts off your passage with a well-timed feint. Your martial attack can Slow or Immobilize its target instead of dealing damage. When you declare a melee or ranged attack, you can choose to have the attack hamper the target’s movement instead of dealing damage. If you achieve 1 or 2 successes, the target is Slowed (they must spend ? extra energy for each segment of movement). If you achieve 3 or more successes, the target is Immobilized (they cannot intentionally move, but you can be pushed or pulled). The maximum number of successes is your Pinning Attack rating. The target must use Shake It Off to remove the effect.

                              Precision Attack Specialized Martial Skill (Action) Breathing in, out, in, out, you steady yourself for the shot… You can spend energy to gain bonus dice for your next martial attack. Spend energy up to your Precision Shot rating, your next martial attack gains ? bonus die for each spent energy. You do not gain these bonus dice if you are the target of an attack or if you use another action or reaction before you make the attack.

                              Pressing Attack Specialized Martial Skill (Reaction) The shrouded warrior slashes, driving his target into the midst of his waiting allies. You can move your target 5’ immediately after you make a melee attack. When a melee attack you make against a target no more than one size larger than you resolves, as a reaction you can immediately move your target 5’ into unobstructed space. You can use this reaction once per round for reach Pressing Attack rating (these uses reset when you regain energy at the start of a turn).

                              Quick Load Specialized Martial Skill (Bonus) The archery master glances at you, raises her bow, looses her first arrow. In a flash, she draws another from the quiver and launches it after the first. By the time your eyes return to her, the third arrow is away after the first two, which are still in flight. You can quickly reload a ranged weapon. When you reload a ranged weapon (such as with a bullet, bolt, arrow, round, magazine, pack, or shell), the cost of loading a single piece of ammo or swapping an ammo pack is reduced by ?. If you can load multiple pieces of ammo in a single round, then this bonus can be applied once per round for each Quick Load rating (these uses reset when you regain energy at the start of a turn).

                              Retaliation Specialized Martial Skill (Bonus) Although your attack strikes hard, it seems to only embolden the towering monstrosity. You gain bonus energy when you are damaged. When you are damaged by an enemy attack, you gain ? bonus energy for each damage your take, up to your Retaliation rating. This bonus energy lasts until the end of your next turn.

                              Reaping Blow Specialized Martial Skill (Bonus) The huge warrior wades through your allies, striking them down like a farmer reaping wheat. With each that falls, then warrior builds momentum. You gain bonus energy when you kill an enemy. When you kill an enemy with a melee attack, you gain ? bonus energy for each damage that you dealt, up to your Reaping Blow rating. This bonus energy lasts until the end of your next turn.

                              Reflex Strike Specialized Martial Skill (Reaction) Your ally slumps down next to you under the force of an enemy’s attack; you seize the moment to strike that enemy, while he is off-balance and overextended. You make a melee attack at an enemy within your reach when it attacks an ally. When an enemy within your reach resolves an attack that does include you in its targets, you can immediately make a melee attack at that target. The attack’s cost is reduced by your Reflex Strike rating.

                              Repel Specialized Martial Skill (Reaction) The sarissa warriors lower their long pikes, slowing the advance of their opponents and preventing them from using their shorter weapons. You harass and impede enemies as they approach you. When a target moves into your reach, or a target within your reach moves closer to you, you can spend energy up to your Repel rating. For each energy you spend, the target must spend an additional ?? energy, or they are pushed back out of your reach.

                              Shadow Lurker Specialized Martial Skill (Bonus)‚ There is danger in the shadows, stay close to the light, my child.? You gain bonus dice when you attack a target that isn’t aware of you. When you make a martial attack against a target that is not aware of you, your action pool gains ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Shadow Lurker rating.

                              Shield Bash Specialized Martial Skill (Action) You brace yourself against their charge. As you feel the crash against your shield, you push back, sending someone ” or something ” sprawling to the ground. You can push an adjacent target with your shield. When you are wielding a shield in your off-hand, you can make a melee attack at an adjacent target. Spend ? and then add energy, up to your Shield Bash rating. If the attack is successful, the target is pushed back 5’ for each success and knocked Prone (each 5’ of movement costs ? extra energy, you cannot run, getting up costs ??, action pool loses ?? (min. ? die) when making melee attacks, PD pool loses ?? (min. ? die) when defending melee attacks, PD pool gains ?? when defending ranged attacks by non-adjacent attackers).

                              Shrouding Strike Specialized Martial Skill (Bonus) The brawler ducks and weaves, sending quick jabs at your face. Strike after strike, and your blood streams into your swollen eyes. You gain bonus PD dice when you damage a target. Each time you damage a target with a martial attack, you cumulatively gain ? die to your PD pool when defending that target’s attacks, up to your Shrouding Strike rating.

                              Sidestep Specialized Martial Skill (Reaction) Your training saves you when you notice the telltale deviation of the attack, giving you the chance to defend yourself. You can add dice to your PD pool after the attack and defense dice had been rolled. When you are the target of an attack against your PD and the dice have been rolled, you can spend ? and then add energy to your PD pool, up to your Sidestep rating. These additional dice are rolled immediately.

                              Split-Tongue Shot Specialized Martial Skill (Action) The elf lays three arrows across his carved bow, draws the bowstring, straining the wood, and looses the three arrows like a flock of arcing birds. You can attack multiple targets with your ranged attack. If you are wielding a weapon that can hold two or more pieces of ammunition (such as a bow or a sling), you can make a ranged attack at multiple targets that are adjacent to each other. You can add one extra target for each Split-Tongue Shot rating. You must pay the normal energy costs of the ranged attack, and you gain the benefits of the associated basic martial skill (Ranged Weapons). You then split the action pool as evenly as possible between the targets, and each pool gains ? bonus die for each energy added to the original attack, up your Split-Tongue Shot rating. Each pool then resolves against its target separately.

                              Strikeback Attack Specialized Martial Skill (Bonus) Their ferocious blows rain down on you. But with each blow, the strength of your strike back builds. When you are attacked, you gain bonus dice for your next martial attack. Each time you are the target of an attack against your PD, you cumulatively gain ? bonus die to next martial attack, up to your Strikeback Attack rating. You do not gain these bonus dice if you use another action or reaction before you make the attack.

                              Stunning Attack Specialized Martial Skill (Reaction) The metallic clang resounds across the battlefield. The armor-clad giant staggers, clutching his head. Your martial attack can Daze or Stun its target instead of dealing damage. When you declare a martial attack, you can choose to have the attack hamper the target’s actions instead of dealing damage. If you achieve 1 or 2 successes, the target is Dazed (they must spend ? extra energy for each action or reaction). If you achieve 3 or more successes, the target is Stunned (they must spend ?? extra energy for each action or reaction). The maximum number of successes is your Stunning Blow rating. The target must use Shake It Off to remove the effect.

                              Suck It Up Specialized Martial Skill (Reaction) Blow after blow rain on you. You raise your arms beside your head, and keep your elbows tight to protect your sides. You can use your Stamina to add energy to your PD instead of your Agility. When using your Dodge action, you can use your Stamina instead of your Agility to determine how much energy you can add, up to your Suck It Up rating.

                              Surprise Attack Specialized Martial Skill (Bonus) The ronin saunters into the middle of the street, idly scratching his stubble. He pauses, squinting, as an unkempt rabble file out of the gambling house. The ronin’s hand drops to rest on the hilt of his katana. You can surprise your enemies by starting an encounter without a wielded weapon. When you start an encounter without a wielded weapon, the first martial attack you make gains ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Surprise Attack rating.

                              Take The Initiative Specialized Martial Skill (Action) You step backwards, once, twice, thrice, dodging attacks, until your back presses against a cold stone wall. You take a moment to regroup, then push off the wall and impose yourself back into the fight. You can spend energy to attempt to improve your initiative. Add energy to your action pool up to your Agility rating, and gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Take The Initiative rating. Roll these dice and choose to use this roll as your initiative roll instead of your existing initiative roll. Take The Initiative cannot be used again until you next regain energy at the start of a turn.

                              Trip Specialized Martial Skill (Bonus) The second-last thing you see is the world tipping as you tumble to the ground. The last thing you see is a sword-point driving towards the narrow eye-slit of your helmet. You gain bonus dice when you try to trip an adjacent target. When you attempt a Strength or Agility test to trip an adjacent target, you gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Trip rating. If the attribute test is successful, the target is knocked Prone (each 5’ of movement costs ? extra energy, you cannot run, getting up costs ??, action pool loses ?? (min. ? die) when making melee attacks, PD pool loses ?? (min. ? die) when defending melee attacks, PD pool gains ?? when defending ranged attacks by non-adjacent attackers).

                              Twist The Blade Specialized Martial Skill (Reaction) You duck under the great wyrm’s raking claw, and drive the point of your sword upwards. The sword point strikes a hard scale, slides, catches, then sinks into giving flesh. Sensing opportunity, you put your palm to the pommel and force it deeper. You can add dice to your action pool after the attack and defense dice had been rolled. When you make a melee attack and the dice have been rolled, you can spend ? and then add energy to your action pool, up to your Twist The Blade rating. These additional dice are rolled immediately.

                              Unarmored Defense Specialized Martial Skill (Bonus) The lithe duelist ducks and slips aside from the wild slashes. Your dodge action increases your PD when not wearing armor. When you are not wearing armor (your PD pool is ?) and you spend energy to use your Dodge action, your PD pool gains bonus dice equal to the added energy each subsequent time you are attacked, up to your Unarmored Defense rating. This bonus lasts until the start of your next turn.

                              Weakening Attack Specialized Martial Skill (Reaction) You batter and harry, trying not to injure, but to tire. Your martial attack can Weaken or Enfeeble its target instead of dealing damage. When you declare a melee or ranged attack, you can choose to have the attack hamper the target’s attacks instead of dealing damage. If you achieve 1 or 2 successes, the target is Weakened (their attacks deal 1 less damage). If you achieve 3 or more successes, the target is Enfeebled (their attacks deal half damage). The maximum number of successes is your Weakening Attack rating. The target must use Shake It Off to remove the effect.

                              Weakpoint Strike Specialized Martial Skill (Bonus) The warrior’s armor deflects the blow, but a cracking sound tells a deeper story. Pressing the advantage, the barbarian pounds at the armor, crunching bones beneath. Your attack strengthens when you attack a target you hit with your last attack. When you hit an enemy with an attack that only targets that enemy, your next attack against that enemy gains ? bonus die. Each consecutive time that you hit that enemy, you gain an additional bonus die, up to your Weakpoint Strike rating.

                              Whirlwind Attack Specialized Martial Skill (Action) The razor-sharp blade flashes, barely disturbing the fragile flames that burn atop each of the four candles. The swordswoman, blade already sheathed, nudges the table, toppling the neatly bisected tops of each of the candles. You can make a melee attack at multiple targets that are adjacent to each other. When there are multiple targets within your reach that are also adjacent to each other, you can make a melee attack at them. You can add one extra target for each Whirlwind Attack rating. You must pay the normal energy costs of the melee attack, and you gain the benefits of the associated basic martial skill (such as Melee Weapons or Finesse Weapons). You then split the action pool as evenly as possible between the targets, and each pool gains ? bonus die for each energy added to the original attack, up your Whirlwind Attack rating. Each pool then resolves against its target separately.

                              Magic Skills

                              The use of magic in Forge Engine games has two elements:

                              • Magic casting traits
                              • Individual spell skills

                              To use magic, a character needs a magic casting trait from at least one of the schools of magic, and then one or more skills for the individual spells they want to use.

                              Schools of Magic:

                              • Animist (Acuity)
                              • Arcane (Intelligence)
                              • Divine (Acuity)
                              • Mystic (Influence)
                              • Necromancy (Intelligence)
                              • Pyromancy (Intelligence)
                              • Summoner (Acuity)
                              • Telekinesis (Intelligence)

                              Cantrip Magic Skills

                              You must have a magic casting trait to train these skills. Detect Magic Cantrip Magic Skill (Action) The last words of the incantation are spoken. They hang in the air, as if visible. And then bluish glows emanate from the ancient books that cover the desk. You detect nearby magical energy. Expend ?; then add energy to your action pool up to your Influence, Intelligence, or Acuity rating and gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Detect Magic rating. Make an Influence/Intelligence/Acuity (Detect Magic) attribute test at difficulty 9 to determine the source and type of any magical enchantments within 25’. If you achieve 1 or 2 successes, you detect the location of magic within range. If you achieve 3 or more successes, you also determine the spell and its effects.

                              Light Cantrip Magic Skill (Action) In the distance, a mote flickers, and grows, and grows, and pushes back the darkness. You create a light source on an inanimate object. Add energy to your action pool up to your Influence, Intelligence, or Acuity rating and gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Light rating. Create a light source on an object that illuminates an area with a radius of 25’. The light persists for 10 minutes for each die in your action pool.

                              Animist Magic Skills

                              You must have the Anima Casting trait to train these skills. Cleanse Animist Magic Acuity Skill (Action) Your bodyguard staggers under a heavy blow, stunned. You mutter an incantation, and flow your power into him to shake the fog from his eyes. You attempt to remove ongoing conditions from yourself or an ally. Add energy to your action pool up to your Acuity rating and gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Cleanse rating. Assign all of the dice yourself or an adjacent ally. The target immediately uses the dice to attempt to remove an effect that can be ended with Shake It Off.

                              Strengthened Hide Animist Magic Acuity Skill (Action) Your skin tightens beneath her hand, and then a scaly greyness spreads. You improve the PD of yourself or an ally. Add energy to your action pool up to your Acuity rating and gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Strengthened Hide rating. Assign all of the dice to yourself or an adjacent ally. For the next minute, each time the target’s PD is attacked, they add ? of these dice to their PD.

                              Healing Touch Animist Magic Acuity Skill (Action) Ser Gale’s wounds close as you channel magic into his body. Drained, you slump back and heave deep breaths. You heal yourself or an ally. Expend ?, then add energy to your action pool up to your Acuity rating and gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Healing Touch rating. Assign all of the dice to yourself or an adjacent ally. The target recovers 1 heath for each assigned die.

                              Armored Army Animist Magic Acuity Skill (Action) The ragged horde begins its charge. You draw the warriors to you and chant the ancient words that will harden them against the coming onslaught. You improve the PD of yourself and your allies. Expend ??, then add energy to your action pool up to your Acuity rating and gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Armored Army rating. Distribute the dice among yourself or allies within 25’ of you. For the next minute, these allies gain bonus dice to their PD equal to the number of dice assigned to them.

                              Body Hammer Animist Magic Acuity Skill (Action) Ser Gale’s muscles bulge from the magister’s ensorcellment, He whips his great sword easily, testing its weight. You bolster the physical strength of yourself or an ally. Expend ??, then add energy to your action pool up to your Acuity rating and gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Body Hammer rating. Assign all of the dice to yourself or an adjacent ally. For the next minute, when the target makes an attack based on their Strength attribute (such as a melee or thrown weapon attack), in addition to gaining bonus dice for their matching basic (such as Melee Weapons or Thrown Weapons) and specialized skills (such as Engaged Attack), they also gain bonus dice equal to your accumulated dice.

                              Healing Wave Animist Magic Acuity Skill (Action) Around you, your friends are tired and battered.‚ Whatever magic you have left, let us have it now, you implore her. You heal yourself and nearby allies. Expend ??, then add energy to your action pool up to your Acuity rating and gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Healing Wave rating. Distribute the dice among yourself and allies within 25’ of you. The targets recover 1 heath for each assigned die.

                              Arcane Magic Skills

                              You must have the Arcane Casting trait to train these skills. Arcane Retribution Arcane Magic Intelligence Skill (Action) You swathe yourself in crackling energy, daring your enemies to strike. You cover yourself in arcane forces that attack an enemy that attacks you. Add energy to your action pool up to your Intelligence rating and gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Arcane Retribution rating. The next time an adjacent character’s attack against you resolves, make an arcane melee attack (action pool vs PD) at that character. Arcane retribution dissipates after 1 minute or when used.

                              Arcane Spark Arcane Magic Intelligence Skill (Action) The sizzling streak leaps from the mage’s outstretched hand. You barely manage to dive aside as it blasts the wall behind you. You attack a nearby enemy. Add energy to your action pool up to your Intelligence rating and gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Arcane Spark rating. Make an arcane ranged attack (action pool vs PD) at a target within 25’. The attack deals half damage (round up).

                              Arcane Touch Arcane Magic Intelligence Skill (Action) You strike the beast as it reaches you, sending a surge of arcane energy into the fearsome creature’s body. You attack an adjacent enemy. Add energy to your action pool up to your Intelligence rating and gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Arcane Touch rating. Make an arcane melee attack (action pool vs PD) at an adjacent target.

                              Arcane Bolts Arcane Magic Intelligence Skill (Action) Crackling bolts flash from your hands and slam into the distant foes. You attack multiple nearby enemies. Expend ?, then add energy to your action pool up to your Intelligence rating and gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Arcane Bolts rating. Distribute the dice among one or more targets up to 100’ away, then make arcane ranged attacks (action pool vs PD) at each target.

                              Arcane Burst Arcane Magic Intelligence Skill (Action) As the enemies close in, you unleash an explosion arcane energy. You attack all nearby enemies. Expend ?, then add energy to your action pool up to your Intelligence rating and gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Arcane Burst rating. Make an arcane magic attack (action pool vs PD) at all targets within 25’ of you.

                              Arcane Vortex Arcane Magic Intelligence Skill (Action) The distant flash of arcane power sees friend and foe topple like dolls. You attack all characters close to a point you choose. Expend ??, then add energy to your action pool up to your Intelligence rating and gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Arcane Vortex rating. Make an arcane magic attack (action pool vs PD) at all targets within 25’ of a point up to 100’ away.

                              Arcane Maelstrom Arcane Magic Intelligence Skill (Action) You tear the raw arcane power from your body and direct it at your enemies, enveloping them in a chaotic tumult of primal forces. You create a persistent area that attacks all nearby characters. Expend ???, then add energy to your action pool up to your Intelligence rating and gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Arcane Maelstrom rating. Make an arcane magic attack (action pool vs PD) of all targets within 25’ of a point up to 100’ away. The effect lasts for one round for each Arcane Maelstrom rating, and concludes at the end of your round. Each time a target ends its turn in the effect area or enters the effect area, make an arcane magic attack (action pool vs PD) at the target.

                              Divine Magic Skills

                              You must have the Divine Casting trait to train these skills. Divine Guidance Divine Magic Acuity Skill (Action) The wizened priest catches your arm,‚ Breghar’s strength goes with you, he mutters. You aid your own or an ally’s attacks. Add energy to your action pool up to your Acuity rating and gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Divine Guidance rating. Assign all of the dice to yourself or an adjacent ally. For the next minute, each time the target makes an attack, they can add ? of these dice to their action pool.

                              Divine Protection Divine Magic Acuity Skill (Action) The page stands in front of you, close enough to see her tremble in fear.‚ Girl, Breghar favors you with his protection, you utter as you squeeze her shoulder. You aid your own or an ally’s physical defense. Add energy to your action pool up to your Acuity rating and gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Divine Protection rating. Assign all of the dice to yourself or an adjacent ally. Each time the target’s PD is attacked, they can add ? of these dice to their defense pool. Divine protection dissipates after 1 minute or when depleted.

                              Retributive Strike Divine Magic Acuity Skill (Reaction) The crude sword pierces you; you lock eyes with the slick-haired pirate,‚ Feel Breghar’s retribution, you gasp. You strike back at an enemy that attacks you. When you are attacked by an adjacent enemy, add energy to your action pool up to your Acuity rating and gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Retributive Strike rating. Make a divine melee attack (action pool vs PD) at that enemy.

                              Divine Blessing Divine Magic Acuity Skill (Action) You feel the strange tingle of pent up energy as you wade into the battle. When your first blow strikes, the energy leaps off you and envelopes your attacker. You aid your own or an ally’s next attack. Expend ?, then add energy to your action pool up to your Acuity rating and gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Divine Blessing rating. Assign all of the dice to yourself or an adjacent ally. The target then gains these dice to their next attack. Divine blessing dissipates after 1 minute.

                              Divine Word Divine Magic Acuity Skill (Action)‚ Breghar, I call on your power and majesty, and I give from my body, that you strike!? You attack a nearby enemy. Expend ?, then add energy to your action pool up to your Acuity rating and gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Divine Word rating. Make a divine ranged attack (action pool vs PD) at an enemy within 25’.

                              Divine Armor Divine Magic Acuity Skill (Action) An old man ” robed and oblivious ” crosses the blood-slicked deck below you. You choose your moment, then drop, sword-plunging at his back. As the point strikes, a resonant chime rings out, and it inexplicably glances off his skin. You boost your physical defense. Expend ??, then add energy to your action pool up to your Acuity rating and gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Divine Armor rating. You gain bonus dice to your PD equal to the number of dice in your action pool. Divine armor dissipates after 1 minute.

                              Divine Might Divine Magic Acuity Skill (Action) You look up from the ground, where you cower prostrate. Your gaze crawls up an old man’s sandaled feet, his coarse robe, to his sallow-cheeked face. He completes his prayer,‚ Breghar’s strength fills you. Go with his strength.? You boost your own or an ally’s physical attacks. Expend ??, then add energy to your action pool up to your Acuity rating and gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Divine Might rating. Assign all of the dice to yourself or an adjacent ally. For the next minute, when the target makes an attack based on their Strength or Agility attributes (such as a melee, ranged, or thrown weapon attack), in addition to gaining bonus dice for their matching basic (such as Melee Weapons, Ranged Weapons or Thrown Weapons) and specialized skills (such as Engaged Attack), they also gain bonus dice equal to the assigned dice.

                              Mystical Magic Skills

                              You must have the Mystical Casting trait to train these skills. Baneful Word Mystical Magic Influence Skill (Action) The dark-eyed witch is within striking distance, yet you can barely bring yourself to raise your sword against her. You make a nearby enemy’s attacks against you more expensive. Add energy to your action pool up to your Influence rating and gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Baneful Word rating. Make a ranged attack (action pool vs MD) at a target within 25’. For the next minute, for each success the target must spend ? additional energy for any attack that includes you in its targets. The target can use Shake It Off to remove the effect.

                              Deflecting Word Mystical Magic Influence Skill (Reaction) Your gaze drills into the distant archer. His arm trembles as he tries to draw his bow. You distract a nearby enemy from attacking you. When you are declared the target of an attack by an enemy within 25’, add energy to your action pool up to your Influence rating and gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Deflecting Word rating. Make a ranged attack (action pool vs MD) at your attacker. For each success, the target must spend ? additional energy or their attack fails.

                              Dazzling Word Mystical Magic Influence Skill (Action) The sell-sword beside you staggers under the crone’s gaze. You leap forward alone. You Daze or Stun a nearby enemy. Expend ?, then add energy to your action pool up to your Influence rating and gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Dazzling Word rating. Make a ranged attack (action pool vs MD) at a target within 25’. If you achieve 1 or 2 successes, the target is Dazed (they must spend ? extra energy for each action or reaction, defense pool reduced by ?). If you achieve 3 or more successes, the target is Stunned (they must spend ?? extra energy for each action or reaction, defense pool reduced by ??). The target can use Shake It Off to remove the effect.

                              Miring Word Mystical Magic Influence Skill (Action) You mutter an ancient hex, leadening the warrior’s movement, and scamper away. You Slow or Immobilize a nearby enemy. Expend ?, then add energy to your action pool up to your Influence rating and gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Miring Word rating. Make a ranged attack (action pool vs MD) at a target within 25’. If you achieve 1 or 2 successes, the target is Slowed (they must spend ? extra energy for each segment of movement). If you achieve 3 or more successes, the target is Immobilized (they cannot intentionally move, but you can be pushed or pulled). The target can use Shake It Off to remove the effect.

                              Exhausting Word Mystical Magic Influence Skill (Action) Before you can reach her, she hisses a curse at you. You stagger, your legs suddenly frail, and barely enough strength to lift your sword. You Enervate or Exhaust a nearby enemy. Expend ??, then add energy to your action pool up to your Influence rating and gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Exhausting Word rating. Make a ranged attack (action pool vs MD) at a target within 25’. If you achieve 1 or 2 successes, the target is Enervated (they only regain energy equal to their two highest attributes each turn). If you achieve 3 or more successes, the target is Exhausted (they only regain energy equal to their single highest attribute each turn). The target can use Shake It Off to remove the effect.

                              Word of Command Mystical Magic Influence Skill (Action) Summoning the last of your power, you command the warrior,‚ Kill your friend!? Slowly, he turns toward his dazed ally and raises his sword. You command a nearby enemy. Expend ??, then add energy to your action pool up to your Influence rating and gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Word of Command rating. Write down a verbal command of one or more words. Make a ranged attack (action pool vs MD) at a target within 25’. For each success, the target will execute one word of your written command to the best of its ability, starting with the first word, and then adding the next word for each additional success. The target must be able to understand the command to follow it. At the start of each turn, the target uses energy equal to its MD to use Shake It Off to remove the effect.

                              Necromancy Magic Skills

                              You must have the Necromancy Casting trait to train these skills. Compel Undead Necromancy Magic Intelligence Skill (Action) You slap away the intruder’s flaming torch, and slam him to the floor. You loom over him,‚ Take him to the crypt, my child.? From the darkness comes a shuffling figure, eager to do your bidding. You command a nearby undead character. Add energy to your action pool up to your Intelligence rating and gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Compel Undead rating. Write down a verbal command of one or more words. Make a ranged attack (action pool vs MD) at an undead target within 25’. For each success, the target will execute one word of your written command to the best of its ability, starting with the first word, and then adding the next word for each additional success. The target must be able to understand the command to follow it. At the start of each turn, the target uses energy equal to its MD to use Shake It Off to remove the effect.

                              Draining Touch Necromancy Magic Intelligence Skill (Action) You peer into the darkness, scanning for valuables by the weak light of your flaming torch. The stale crypt air becomes acrid. You turn in time to see a withered black hand slash from the darkness. You attack an adjacent target. Add energy to your action pool up to your Intelligence rating and gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Draining Touch rating. Make a necrotic melee attack (action pool vs PD) at an adjacent target.

                              Necrotic Touch Necromancy Magic Intelligence Skill (Action) The intruder’s henchman leaps out of the shadows, swinging a flaming torch. The black-robed wraith surges toward the henchman, and holds him fast. You grasp the man’s screaming face and drain his life force, leaving a desiccated husk. You drain health from an adjacent living character if you reduce it to 0 health. Expend ?, then add energy to your action pool up to your Intelligence rating and gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Necrotic Touch rating. Make a necrotic melee attack (action pool vs PD) at an adjacent living target. If the attack achieves more successes than the target has remaining health, then the target takes the damage and you gain health equal to the amount of damage dealt. If the attack does not achieve enough successes to reduce the target’s health to 0 or less, then it deals no damage.

                              Revitalizing Touch Necromancy Magic Intelligence Skill (Action) You release what remains of the henchman, it falls to the ground like kindling. You gently touch the wraith, and revitalize its dark energy with our own strength. You heal an adjacent undead character. Expend ?, then add energy to your action pool up to your Intelligence rating and gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Revitalizing Touch rating. An adjacent undead target recovers 1 heath for each die in your action pool.

                              Devouring Touch Necromancy Magic Intelligence Skill (Action) The graverobber scrambles backwards across the flagstones, and he slams hard into the heavy sarcophagus. He screams as the wraith’s defiling hand reaches for him. The scream quiets, heartbeat by heartbeat, as his life force passes to the wraith. You drain health from an adjacent living character. Expend ??, then add energy to your action pool up to your Intelligence rating and gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Devouring Touch rating. Make a necrotic melee attack (action pool vs PD) at an adjacent living target. The target takes damage equal to the number of successes and you recover health equal to the damage.

                              Dominate Undead Necromancy Magic Intelligence Skill (Action)‚ Come to me, my child.? Your eyes open. Your vision milky. You shuffle, puppet-like, to your new master. You assert temporary control of a distant undead character. Expend ??, then add energy to your action pool up to your Intelligence rating and gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Dominate Undead rating. Make a ranged attack (action pool vs MD) at an undead target within 100’. If the attack is successful, you control the actions of the target. At the start of each turn, the target uses energy equal to its MD to use Shake It Off to remove the effect.

                              Hasten Death Necromancy Magic Intelligence Skill (Action) The intruder scrambles backwards,‚ I will feast on your soul, you exhale. Your target takes additional damage from attacks. Expend ??, then add energy to your action pool up to your Intelligence rating and gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Hasten Death rating. Make a ranged attack (action pool vs PD) at a target within 100’. For each success, the target takes additional damage each time it takes damage. The additional damage is equal to the number of successes, up to the damage from the triggering attack. Hasten death dissipates after 1 minute.

                              Pyromancy Magic Skills

                              You must have the Pyromancer Casting trait to train these skills. Fiery Bolt Arcane Magic Intelligence Skill (Action) Flames burn around your hand. You savor their majesty for a moment, then throw them across the town square at the frenzied townsfolk. You attack a nearby target. Add energy to your action pool up to your Intelligence rating and gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Fiery Bolt rating. Make a fire ranged attack (action pool vs PD) at a target within 25’. The attack deals half damage.

                              Flame Armor Pyromancy Magic Intelligence Skill (Action) The red wizard pauses to intone ancient words. She is immediately wreathed in flames that ” inexplicitly ” do not injure her. You cover yourself in flames that can damage an enemy that attacks you. Add energy to your action pool up to your Intelligence rating and gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Flame Armor rating. The next time you are attacked by an adjacent character, make a fire melee attack (action pool vs PD) at that character. Flame armor dissipates after 1 minute.

                              Flaming Touch Arcane Magic Intelligence Skill (Action) Townsfolk tumble, their rags aflame, as the red wizard strides through them. You attack an adjacent target. Add energy to your action pool up to your Intelligence rating and gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Flaming Touch rating. Make a fire melee attack (action pool vs PD) at an adjacent target.

                              Flame Spray Pyromancy Magic Intelligence Skill (Action) The red wizard spreads her hands, and sheet of red flame gouts from her fingers. You spray flames that attack multiple nearby targets. Expend ?, then add energy to your action pool up to your Intelligence rating and gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Flame Spray rating. Make a fire ranged attack (action pool vs PD) at all targets inside a 90° arc within 15’.

                              Flame Wave Pyromancy Magic Intelligence Skill (Action) The townsfolk are repelled for just a moment. A shout comes from behind them,‚ It’s just one woman, you cowardly curs!? The people close in slowly. The red wizard twists a smile, and punches the ground to send bursting from her an exploding wave immolates the mob’s remaining resolve. You send a flaming wave that attacks all nearby targets. Expend ?, then add energy to your action pool up to your Intelligence rating and gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Flame Wave rating. Make a fire ranged attack (action pool vs PD) at all targets within 25’.

                              Pillar of Flame Pyromancy Magic Intelligence Skill (Action) A great burning flame erupts from the ground, scattering the screaming lynch mob. You attack a distant target. Expend ?, then add energy to your action pool up to your Intelligence rating and gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Pillar of Flame rating. Make a fire ranged attack (action pool vs PD) at a target within 100’.

                              Enflame Pyromancy Magic Intelligence Skill (Action) From amidst the burning and screaming mob, comes striding the town’s champion. Mid-step he is encoiled in flames. He staggers for a moment, his skin blistering. You cover a nearby target in persistent flames. Expend ??, then add energy to your action pool up to your Intelligence rating and gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Enflame rating. Make a fire magic attack (action pool vs PD) at a target within 100’. Continue this attack on each turn, with one fewer dice until no dice remain in your action pool. The target can use Shake It Off to remove the effect.

                              Fireball Pyromancy Magic Intelligence Skill (Action)‚ Strike me down, but your village will burn to the ground, your people with it!? A spark streaks overhead and plunges into the middle of the distant houses. A white-hot explosion blooms above the silhouetted houses, rending them to ash. You cause a fiery explosion in the distance. Expend ??, then add energy to your action pool up to your Intelligence rating and gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Fireball rating. Make a fire ranged attack (action pool vs PD) at all targets within 25’ of a point within 100’.

                              Summoner Magic Skills

                              You must have the Summoner Casting trait to train these skills. Armor Summoned Creature Summoner Magic Acuity Skill (Action) The summoner lays his hand on the beast’s muscled back. The animal’s hide hardens. You improve the physical defense of a summoned creature. Add energy to your action pool up to your Acuity rating and gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Armor Summoned Creature rating. Assign all of the dice to an adjacent summoned creature. Each time the target’s PD is attacked, they add ? of these dice to their PD. Armor summoned creature dissipates after 1 minute.

                              Life Bind Summoner Magic Acuity Skill (Action) The beast rushes into the battle, through sword slashes and piercing feints. With each wound, a matching cut and rent tears open on the bearded man. You share damage with a summoned creature. Add energy to your action pool up to your Acuity rating and gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Life Bind rating. Assign all of the dice to an adjacent summoned creature. Each time the target creature takes damage, that damage is split evenly between you and the summoned creature. Any leftover damage is taken by the summoned creature. Armor summoned creature triggers once for each assigned die, and dissipates after 1 minute.

                              Heal Summoned Creature Summoner Magic Acuity Skill (Action) Bloodied and disheveled, the beast limps from the front line. The bearded summoner kneels in front of the animal, and with a magical incantation, the animal’s wounds knit together. With a snarl, the beast leaps back into the battle. You heal a summoned creature. Expend ?, then add energy to your action pool up to your Acuity rating and gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Heal Summoned Creature rating. Assign all of the dice to an adjacent summoned creature. The target recovers 1 heath for each assigned die.

                              Summon Creature Summoner Magic Acuity Skill (Action) In a quiet forest glade, surrounded by intricately carved standing stones, the bearded summoner prepares to perform the summoning ritual. You summon a creature. Expend energy up to your Acuity rating, then gain ?? bonus dice to your action pool for each expended energy, up to twice your Summon Creature rating. At a rest, you call into existence a creature with maximum energy equal or lower than the number of dice in your action pool. Use the Adversary Templates on page 125 as a guide for this creature. The summoned creature appears in an empty space adjacent to you. The creature is an ally of yours, understands your commands, and is under your control. While the summoned creature is alive, you cannot regain the energy you expended to cast this spell. The creature is dispelled if it falls unconscious, and you can dispel the creature during a short rest.

                              Telekinetic Magic Skills

                              You must have the Telekinesis Casting trait to train these skills. Bind Telekinesis Magic Intelligence Skill (Action)‚ Intruder Alert!? flashes the droid’s command processor. It steps from its home bay. It scans back and forth, immediately sighting and confirming the rogue binder, Kayo. The binder turns to the droid.‚ Error: Motor Drive Failure.? You Slow or Immobilize a nearby enemy. Add energy to your action pool up to your Intelligence rating and gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Bind rating. Make a ranged attack (action pool vs PD) at a target within 25’. If you achieve 1 or 2 successes, the target is Slowed (they must spend ? extra energy for each segment of movement). If you achieve 3 or more successes, the target is Immobilized (they cannot intentionally move, but you can be pushed or pulled). The target can use Shake It Off to remove the effect.

                              Finesse Telekinesis Magic Intelligence Skill (Action) Kayo gestures toward the sleeping guard, twisting his hand. The guard’s key ring twitches, lifts from his belt and hangs in the air, as if held by an invisible hand. You carefully manipulate small objects. Add energy to your action pool up to your Intelligence rating and gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Finesse rating. Target an object within 25’. Make an attribute test using your action pool (up to .5kg, difficulty 7; up to 1kg, difficulty 8; up to 5kg, difficulty 9; up to 15kg, difficult 10). For each success, the target is pushed or pulled 5’.

                              Force Telekinesis Magic Intelligence Skill (Action) The hallways echo with footsteps and distant voices. The robed binder steals from bulkhead to bulkhead. Rounding a corner, he bounces off a hulking droid. Instinctively, he throws out his arms and sends the droid careening into the far wall. You push away a nearby target. Add energy to your action pool up to your Intelligence rating and gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Force rating. Target an object or character within 25’. If the target is a character, make an opposed attribute test using your action pool against the target’s Strength (Athletics) or Agility (Acrobatics). If the target is an object, make an attribute test using your action pool (up to 5kg, difficulty 7; up to 15kg, difficulty 8; up to 50kg, difficulty 9; up to 150kg, difficult 10). For each success, the target is pushed 5’ in a straight line.

                              Crush Telekinesis Magic Intelligence Skill (Action) Kayo steals a glance from behind the crate, confirming that the droid continues its mechanical calculations. Kayo reaches out and crushes the droid’s metal skull. You crush a nearby enemy. Expend ?, then add energy to your action pool up to your Intelligence rating and gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Crush rating. Make a bludgeoning ranged attack (action pool vs PD) at a target within 25’.

                              Fly Telekinesis Magic Intelligence Skill (Action) The binder slips over the railing, and drops slowly down to land gently on the floor of the flight deck, in cover of a menacing starfighter. You or an ally gain the ability to fly. Expend ?, then add energy to your action pool up to your Intelligence rating and gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Fly rating. Assign all of the dice in your action pool to yourself or an adjacent ally. The target’s move speed becomes fly speed for 1 minute for each die.

                              Move Telekinesis Magic Intelligence Skill (Action) The droid switches to thermal mode and scans the hangar deck for any signs of heat from the binder. It scans sector by sector. Unseen by the droid, a large crate skims across the hangar floor, the binder sneaking behind it. You push, pull, or slide a nearby target. Expend ?, then add energy to your action pool up to your Intelligence rating and gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Move rating. Target an object or character within 25’. If the target is a character, make an opposed attribute test using your action pool against the target’s Strength (Athletics) or Agility (Acrobatics). If the target is an object, make an attribute test using your action pool (up to 5kg, difficulty 7; up to 15kg, difficulty 8; up to 50kg, difficulty 9; up to 150kg, difficult 10). For each success, the target is pushed, pulled, or slid 5’ in a straight line.

                              Repulse Telekinesis Magic Intelligence Skill (Action) The binder stands, surrounded. The droids encircle him and move closer. Kayo waits a moment and then sends the droids scattering across the hangar floor. You push back all nearby targets. Expend ?, then add energy to your action pool up to your Intelligence rating and gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Repulse rating. Make a ranged attack (action pool vs PD) at all targets within 25’. For each success, the target is pushed back 5’ in a straight line.

                              Equipment Overview

                              The following sections detail equipment for various historical periods:

                              • Historical
                              • Modern
                              • Sci-Fi

                              Equipment Compatibility

                              These sets of equipment are forward compatible, so historical equipment is usable with modern and sci-fi settings, and modern equipment is also usable in sci-fi settings. For example, a historical sword is usable and useful at any time in history. Additionally, these different eras of equipment are also backwards compatible for genre-mashing games, so sci-fi equipment can be used in historical settings, if the campaign calls for such a mash-up.

                              Equipment Details

                              Each equipment block includes key details about the equipment: Equipment Type Equipment Identifier (Matching Martial Skills) Equipment Energy Cost (Spent) Equipment Type Equipment Rating (Defense Dice Gained) Equipment Energy Cost

                            • Equipment Piece (Min-Max Range) Characteristic Equipment Rating Characteristic Characteristic Characteristic Characteristic Equipment type description and usage instructions. Equipment actions and externalities. Action: Action description Externality: Externality description

                              Equipment – Historical

                              Armor and Shields Armor Equipment (Armor Training) Energy Cost (Spent) Armor Rating (Defense Dice Gained) N/A

                            • Leather Armor ?
    Brigandine ??
    Chainmail ???
    Breastplate ????
    Full Plate ????? When wearing armor, your PD pool is ? plus the armor’s rating. When you wear armor, your Agility rating is capped due to the armor’s bulk (this affects your energy pool, adding dice to attacks, using the Dodge action, etc):
    Leather armor limits your Agility to: ????? ?
    Brigandine limits your Agility to: ?????
    Chainmail limits your Agility to: ????
    Breastplate limits your Agility to: ???
    Full plate limits your Agility to: ?? If your Strength rating or Armor Training rating is lower than the rating of your worn armor, then for each action or reaction you must spend ? extra energy and your Agility rating is effectively 1 less than its rating.

    Shields Equipment (Shield Training) Energy Cost (Spent) Shield Rating (Defense Dice Gained) ?

    Buckler ? ??
    Kite Shield ??? ???
    Tower Shield ???? If your Strength rating or Shield Training rating is lower than the rating of your wielded shield, then the energy cost of using your shield is increased by ?. Actions and externalities: Wield Shield: When defending an attack against your PD, you can spend energy to pay the cost of a shield you wield, and your PD pool gains bonus dice equal to your shield’s rating Melee, Finesse, and Unarmed Weapons Finesse Weapons Equipment (Finesse Weapons) Energy Cost (Spent) Weapon Rating (Attack Dice Gained) ??
    Shiv/Stiletto/Dagger/Knife ? ???
    Rapier/Bayonet/Saber/Scimitar ??? Finesse weapons require one hand to use.

    Melee Weapons Equipment (Melee Weapons) Energy Cost (Spent) Weapon Rating (Attack Dice Gained) ??

    Blackjack ? (none)
    Dagger/Knife/Hand Axe/Shiv/Stiletto ? ???
    Club/Cudgel/Bo Staff ??
    Mace/Spiked Club ???
    Gladius/Shortsword/Scimitar ???
    Bo Staff 2H ???
    War Axe 1H ???
    War Axe 2H ???? ????
    Morningstar/Heavy Mace ?????
    Longsword ?????
    Katana/Bastard Sword 1H ?????
    Great Club 2H ????? ?
    Katana/Bastard Sword 2H ????? ?
    Great Axe/Warhammer 2H ????? ??
    Tulwar/Greatsword 2H ????? ?? 2H: Two-Handed 1H: One handed Melee weapons require one or two hands to use. Some weapons, such as bastard swords and katana, can be used with either one hand or two hands.

    Reach Weapons Equipment (Reach Weapons) Energy Cost (Spent) Weapon Rating (Attack Dice Gained) ???

    Staff/Pole 2H, +5’ ?
    Hunting Spear/Pike 2H, +5’ ?? ????
    Trident/War Spear 2H, +5’ ???? ?????
    Halberd/Lance 2H, +5’ ????? ? 2H: Two-Handed +5’: Reach Reach weapons require two hands to use and extend your immediate range by 5’. Actions and externalities: Reach Range: Target’s defense pool gains ?? when inside weapon’s range Unarmed Weapons Equipment (Brawling, Martial Arts) Energy Cost (Spent) Weapon Rating (Attack Dice Gained) ??
    Punch/Kick ? (none)
    Tiger Claws/Gauntlets ? Ranged and Thrown Weapons Bows and Slings Equipment (Ranged Weapons) Energy Cost (Spent) Weapon Rating (Attack Dice Gained) ???
    Shortbow (10-200’) 2H ??
    Short Sling (10-50’) ??
    Longbow Bow (10-300’) 2H ???? ????
    Composite Bow (10-400’) 2H ????? ?
    Long Sling (10-200’) ???? 2H: Two-Handed All bows require two hands to load and to fire. Slings require one hand to launch, and are ideally loaded using two hands. However, they can be loaded one handed but this doubles the energy cost for the reload action. Bows and slings must be reloaded with an arrow or bullet for each shot. If arrows or bullets are at hand, such as in a slung quiver or a worn pouch, reloading these weapons requires you to spend ?? energy. Arrows and bullets can be held ready on the bowstring or in the sling’s pouch. Bow and sling weapons can attack targets up to four times their range. Actions and externalities: Reload: Spend ?? to load an arrow or bullet using two hands Spend ???? to load a bullet using one hand Range: Target’s defense pool gains ?? when inside weapon’s range and gains ?? for each range increment beyond the weapon’s range Crossbows Equipment (Ranged Weapons) Energy Cost (Spent) Weapon Rating (Attack Dice Gained) ?
    Hand Crossbow (10-30’) ? ??
    Light Crossbow (10-50’) 2H ??? ???
    Crossbow (10-100’) 2H ????? ????
    Heavy Crossbow (15-200’) 2H ????? ? ?????
    Arbalest (20-300’) 2H ????? ??? 2H: Two-Handed Crossbow weapons require two hands to wield and reload, except for hand crossbows, which can be wielded single-handed, but still require two hands to reload. Crossbows must be reloaded with a fresh bolt for each shot. If bolts are at hand, such as in a worn bandolier, reloading a crossbow requires you to spend energy equal to the rating of the crossbow. Crossbows can be held ready to fire. Crossbow weapons can attack targets up to five times their range. Actions and externalities: Reload: Spend energy equal to the crossbow’s rating to reload Range: Target’s defense pool gains ?? when inside weapon’s range and gains ?? for each range increment beyond the weapon’s range

    Thrown Weapons Equipment (Thrown Weapons) Energy Cost (Spent) Weapon Rating (Attack Dice Gained) ??

    Rock (10-30’) ? (none)
    Dagger/Hand Axe (10-30’) ? ???
    Javelin/Hunting Spear (10-50’) ?? ????
    War Spear (10-100’) ??? Thrown weapons are wielded in the main hand, and it is a minor action to draw another thrown weapon. Thrown weapons can attack targets up to twice their range. Actions and externalities: Range: Target’s defense pool gains ?? when inside weapon’s range and gains ?? for each range increment beyond the weapon’s range

    Equipment – Modern Armor and Shields (Modern) Armor Equipment (Armor Training) Energy Cost (Spent) Armor Rating (Defense Dice Gained) N/A

    Type I Body Armor (or thick leather) ?
    Type II Body Armor (or reinforced leather) ??
    Type III-A Body Armor ???
    Type III Body Armor ????
    Type IV Body Armor ????? When wearing armor your PD pool is ? plus the armor’s rating. When you wear armor, your Agility rating is capped due to the armor’s bulk (this affects your energy pool, adding dice to attacks, using the Dodge action, etc):
    Type I Body Armor limits your Agility to: ????? ?
    Type II Body Armor limits your Agility to: ?????
    Type III-A Body Armor limits your Agility to: ????
    Type III Body Armor limits your Agility to: ???
    Type IV Body Armor limits your Agility to: ?? If your Strength rating or Armor Training rating is lower than the rating of your worn armor, then for each action or reaction you must spend ? extra energy and your Agility rating is effectively 1 less than its rating.

    Shields Equipment (Shield Training) Energy Cost (Spent) Shield Rating (Defense Dice Gained) ?

    Light Shield or Improvised Shield ? ??
    Riot Shield ??? ???
    Ballistic Shield ???? If your Strength rating or Shield Training rating is lower than the rating of your wielded shield, then the energy cost of using your shield is increased by ?. Actions and externalities: Wield Shield: When defending an attack against your PD, you can spend energy to pay the cost of a shield you wield, and your PD pool gains bonus dice equal to your shield’s rating Firearms and Thrown Weapons (Modern) Assault Rifle Weapons Equipment (Long Guns) Energy Cost (Spent) Weapon Rating (Attack Dice Gained) ??
    H&K HK416 (4.73mm) (10-100’) 2H, SA, BF, FA ?
    AK-74 (5.45mm) (10-100’) 2H, SA, BF, FA ??
    M16/AR-15/M4 (5.56mm) (10-100’) 2H, SA, BF, FA ??
    Styer AUG (5.56mm) (10-100’) 2H, SA, BF, FA ??
    M14/M1 (7.62mm) (10-100’) 2H, SA, BF, FA ???
    H&K G3 (7.62mm) (10-100’) 2H, SA, BF, FA ???
    AK-47 (7.62mm) (10-100’) 2H, SA, BF, FA ??? 2H: Two-Handed SA: Semi-Auto BF: Burst Fire FA: Full Auto All assault rifles require two hands to use. All assault rifles support the semi-automatic fire mode, SA, where a single shot is fired with each trigger pull. Some also support three-round bursts, BF, where three bullets are discharged for each trigger pull. Finally, some offer full-automatic mode, FA, where the rifle will continue firing while the trigger is held and it still has ammunition. Burst fire generally uses three bullets, while full-automatic uses around 15 rounds, which is usually half of a magazine, depending on the gun’s magazine size. Assault rifles gain further bonus dice when used braced or on a bipod/tripod, or when augmented with a scope or laser sight (or both). Assault rifle weapons can attack targets up to five times their range. Actions and externalities: Range: Target’s defense pool gains ?? when inside weapon’s range and gains ?? for each range increment beyond the weapon’s range Braced: Gain ? bonus dice when braced (Prone or on a support) Tripod: Gain ?? bonus dice when using a bipod or tripod Scope: Gain ?? bonus dice when using a scope (SA/BF only) Laser Sight: Gain ?? bonus dice for a laser sight (SA/BF only) Burst Fire: Spend ? extra energy and gain ??? bonus dice Full-Auto: Spend ??? extra energy, gain ???? bonus dice, and attack all targets within a 15-45º lateral arc Swap Mag: Spend ??? to change magazines Load Mag: Spend ??? to load each bullet into the magazine Explosive Weapons Equipment (Thrown Weapons) Energy Cost (Spent) Weapon Rating (Attack Dice Gained) ???
    Molotov Cocktail (0-30’) LF ??
    Stun Grenade (0-30’) PP, CC ??
    Pipe Bomb (0-30’) LF ???
    Cluster Bomblet (0-50’) PP ????
    Dynamite (Military) Stick (0-50’) LF ????
    F1 Pineapple Frag Grenade (0-50’) PP ?????
    RG42 Can Frag Grenade (0-50’) PP ?????
    TNT Stick (0-50’) LF ????? ?
    M67 Apple Frag Grenade (0-50’) PP ????? ??
    Dynamite (True) Stick (0-50’) LF ????? ??? ?????
    Keg of black-powder (0-25’) 2H, LF ????? ????? LF: Light Fuze PP: Pull Pin IT: Impact Trigger CC: Concussion Explosive weapons are wielded in the main hand, and it is a minor action to draw another explosive weapon (except for 2H explosive weapons, which require two hands). Explosive weapons are thrown at a target or a 5’x5’ space where they explode, making martial ranged attacks all targets within the blast radius. The blast radius for explosive weapons is 5’ for each rating. Explosive weapons can attack targets up to twice their range. Actions and externalities: Range: Target’s defense pool gains ?? for each range increment beyond the weapon’s range Light Fuze: Spend ??? to light a Molotov cocktail cloth or burning fuze Pull Pin: Spend ? to pull a grenade’s firing pin Handgun Weapons Equipment (Small Guns) Energy Cost (Spent) Weapon Rating (Attack Dice Gained) ?
    Zip gun (10-15’) SS ?
    Firestorm (.22 pistol) (10-15’) SA ?
    Colt Agent .38 (10-20’) RV ?
    Walther PPK (.32 cal.) (10-20’) SA ?
    Ruger .357 Magnum (10-25’) RV ??
    Glock 17/20 (9/10mm) (10-25’) SA BF ??
    M1911/S&W 625.45 (10-30’) SA ?? ??
    Super Redhawk .480 Ruger (10-35’) RV ???
    Anaconda .44 Magnum (10-35’) 2H, RV ????
    Desert Eagle (.50 cal.) (10-40’) 2H, SA ?????
    S&W 500 .50 Magnum (10-40’) 2H, RV ????? SA: Semi-Auto RV: Revolver SS: Single Shot BF: Burst Fire 2H: Two-Handed Handguns generally require a single hand to wield. However, heavier examples require two hands to fire effectively. Depending on the specific gun, they offer single-shot, semi-automatic, and burst fire modes. Again depending on the gun, these weapons require reloading after a number of shots;
    Single shot weapons must be reloaded after each bullet is fired
    Revolvers must be reloaded after firing 5-6 bullets
    Pistols have magazines that hold 8-20 bullets Handgun weapons can attack targets up to three times their range. Actions and externalities: Range: Target’s defense pool gains ?? when inside weapon’s range and gains ?? for each range increment beyond the weapon’s range Burst Fire: Spend ? extra energy and gain ??? bonus dice Swap Mag: Spend ??? to change magazines Load Mag: Spend ??? to load each bullet into the magazine Load Revolver: Spend ?? to load each bullet into a revolver Machinegun Weapons Equipment (Heavy Guns) Energy Cost (Spent) Weapon Rating (Attack Dice Gained) ??*
    FN Minimi (5.56mm) (10-100’) 2H, FA ???*
    MG4 (5.56mm) (10-100’) 2H, FA ????* ???*
    HK21 (7.62mm) (10-100’) 2H, FA ?????*
    M60 (7.62mm) (10-100’) 2H, FA ?????* ????*
    M1914 (8mm) (10-100’) 2H, FA ????? ?*
    M240 (7.62mm) (10-100’) 2H, FA ????? ?* ?????*
    M1917 (.30-06) (10-100’) 2H, FA ????? ??*
    M2 (.50 cal) (10-100’) 2H, FA ????? ???* FA: Full Auto 2H: Two-Handed All machineguns require two hands to use. Machine guns can only fire full-automatic mode, FA, where the gun continues firing while the trigger is held and it still has ammunition. The energy costs marked with * are the base cost for these weapons, and to operate these weapons the Full-Auto spend cost must also be paid. The rating of these weapons marked with * also indicates the base dice gained, as additional Full-Auto dice are also gained to the attack pool. Machine guns generally fire at around 750 rounds per minute, and use magazines, boxes, or belt feeds. Machinegun weapons can attack targets up to five times their range. Actions and externalities: Range: Target’s defense pool gains ?? when inside weapon’s range and gains ?? for each range increment beyond the weapon’s range Full-Auto: Spend ??? extra energy, gain ???? bonus dice, and attack all targets within a 15-45º lateral arc Tripod: Gain ?? bonus dice when using a bipod/tripod Swap Mag.: Spend ????? to change magazine, box, or feed Load Mag.: Spend ????? to load each bullet into the magazine Rifle Weapons Equipment (Long Guns) Energy Cost (Spent) Weapon Rating (Attack Dice Gained) ??
    Winchester .22 BB (15-200’) 2H, LA ?
    Winchester .22 CB (15-200’) 2H, LA ?
    Winchester .22 (15-200’) 2H, LA ??
    Voere 6mm Caseless (15-200’) 2H, BA ??
    Remington .308 (15-200’) 2H, BA ???
    FN 1949 .30-06 (15-200’) 2H, BA ???? BA: Bolt Action LA: Lever Action SS: Single Shot SA: Semi-Auto All rifles require two hands to use. Rifle weapons can attack targets up to five times their range. Actions and externalities: Range: Target’s defense pool gains ?? when inside weapon’s range and gains ?? for each range increment beyond the weapon’s range Tripod: Gain ?? bonus dice when using a bipod or tripod Braced: Gain ? bonus dice when properly braced against a solid surface Scope: Gain ?? bonus dice when using a scope Laser Sight: Gain ?? bonus dice for a laser sight Reload BA: Spend ?? to reload a bolt action rifle Reload LA: Spend ?? to reload a lever action rifle Reload SS: Spend ????? to reload a single shot rifle Swap Mag.: Spend ??? to change magazines for BA, LA, SA rifles Load Bullet Spend ??? to load each bullet into the magazine Shotgun Weapons Equipment (Long Guns) Energy Cost (Spent) Weapon Rating (Attack Dice Gained) ??
    12-Gauge Buckshot (5-15’) 2H ?
    20-Gauge Training Shot (5-15’) 2H ??
    12-Gauge Normal Shot (5-15’) 2H ???? ???
    10-Gauge (5-15’) 2H ????? ?
    8-Gauge (5-15’) 2H ????? ???
    6-Gauge Riot Shotgun (5-15’) 2H ????? ????? BR: Break Action PA: Pump Action LA: Lever Action 2H: Two-Handed All shotguns require two hands to use. There are many types of shotgun actions: break action (single or double-barreled), pump action (holding 4-8 shells), lever action (holding 4-8 shells), semi-automatic (holding 8 12-gauge shells), automatic (using magazines that hold 10 12-gauge shell magazines or drums holding 20 or 32 shells). Shotgun weapons can attack targets up to two times their range. Actions and externalities: Range: Target’s defense pool gains ?? when inside weapon’s range and gains ?? for each range increment beyond the weapon’s range Both Barrels: Gain ???? when firing both barrels of a double-barrel shotgun Reload BA: Spend ????? to reload a single barrel break action shotgun Spend ????? ??? to reload a double-barrel break action shotgun Reload PA: Spend ?? to reload a pump action shotgun or to load a shell Reload LA: Spend ?? to reload a lever action shotgun or to load a shell Swap Mag.: Spend ??? to change magazines for SA shotguns Load Shell: Spend ?? to load each shell Sniper Rifle Weapons Equipment (Long Guns) Energy Cost (Spent) Weapon Rating (Attack Dice Gained) ???
    Barrett M82 .50 (20-500’) 2H, SA ?????
    Barrett M99 .50 (20-500’) 2H, SS ????? ? ?????
    Denel NTW-20 (20-500’) 2H, BA ????? ??
    Barrett XM109 25mm (20-500’) 2H, SA ????? ??? BA: Bolt Action LA: Lever Action SS: Single Shot SA: Semi-Auto All sniper rifles require two hands to use, and should be fired Prone. If a sniper or anti-materiel rifle is used handheld (such as unbraced or without a tripod or bipod) then you must spend double the energy cost for each shot. Sniper weapons can attack targets up to five times their range, and up to 10 times their range with appropriate equipment (scope, support, etc). Actions and externalities: Range: Target’s defense pool gains ?? when inside weapon’s range and gains ?? for each range increment beyond the weapon’s range Tripod: Gain ?? bonus dice when using a bipod or tripod Scope: Gain ?? bonus dice when using a scope Laser Sight: Gain ?? bonus dice for a laser sight Reload BA: Spend ?? to reload a bolt action rifle Reload LA: Spend ?? to reload a lever action rifle Reload SS: Spend ????? ? to reload a single shot rifle Swap Mag.: Spend ??? to change magazines for BA, LA, SA rifles Load Mag.: Spend ??? to load each bullet into the magazine Submachine Gun Weapons Equipment (Long Guns) Energy Cost (Spent) Weapon Rating (Attack Dice Gained) ??*
    Thompson M1921 (.45) (10-50’) 2H, FA ? (* see below)
    MP40 (9mm) (10-50’) 2H, FA ??
    Sten (9mm) (10-50’) 2H, FA ??
    Uzi (9mm) (10-50’) 2H, FA ?? ??
    H&K MP5 (9mm) (10-50’) 2H, SA, BF, FA ??
    FPN P90 (5.7mm) (10-50’) 2H, SA, BF, FA ???
    UMP45 (.45) (10-50’) 2H, SA, BF, FA ??? 2H: Two-Handed SA: Semi-Auto BF: Burst Fire FA: Full Auto All submachine guns require two hands to use. Early submachine guns can only fire full-automatic mode, FA, where the gun continues firing while the trigger is held and it still has ammunition. Full-automatic attacks use around 15 bullets from the gun’s magazine. Submachine guns gain further bonus dice when used braced or when augmented with a scope or laser sight (or both). Submachine gun weapons can attack targets up to three times their range. Actions and externalities: Range: Target’s defense pool gains ?? when inside weapon’s range and gains ?? for each range increment beyond the weapon’s range Braced: Gain ? bonus dice when braced (Prone or on a support) Scope: Gain ?? bonus dice when using a scope (SA/BF only) Laser Sight: Gain ?? bonus dice for a laser sight (SA/BF only) Burst Fire: Spend ? extra energy and gain ??? bonus dice Full-Auto: Spend ?? extra energy, gain ??? bonus dice, and attack all targets within a roughly 15-45º lateral arc Swap Mag: Spend ??? to change magazines Load Mag: Spend ??? to load each bullet into the magazine Melee, Finesse, and Unarmed Weapons (Modern) Finesse Weapons Equipment (Finesse Weapons) Energy Cost (Spent) Weapon Rating (Attack Dice Gained) ??
    Shiv/Dagger ? ???
    Rapier/Bayonet/Saber/Scimitar ??? Melee Weapons Equipment (Melee Weapons) Energy Cost (Spent) Weapon Rating (Attack Dice Gained) ??
    Blackjack ?
    Shiv/Knife/Hand Axe ? ???
    Pole/2×4/Baseball Bat 1H ??
    Pole/2×4/Baseball Bat 2H ???
    Machete/Trucker’s Friend ???
    Fire Axe 1H ???
    Fire Axe 2H ???? ????
    Katana 1H ?????
    Katana 2H ????? ?
    Nodachi/Great Club 2H ????? ?? 1H: One-Handed 2H: Two-Handed Melee weapons require one or two hands to wield. Some weapons, such as katanas, can be used one or two handed, with different ratings.

    Unarmed Weapons Equipment (Brawling, Martial Arts) Energy Cost (Spent) Weapon Rating (Attack Dice Gained) ??

    Punch/Kick ?
    Tiger Claws/Knuckle Dusters ? ???
    Boxing Gloves ?

    Equipment – SCI-FI

    Armor and Shields (Sci-Fi) Armor Equipment (Armor Training) Energy Cost (Spent) Armor Rating (Defense Dice Gained) N/A
    Body Armor: Type I Weave ?
    Body Armor: Type II Mesh ??
    Body Armor: Type III Composite ???
    Body Armor: Type IV Polymer ????
    Body Armor: Type V Nano-Weave ????? When wearing armor your PD pool is ? plus the armor’s rating. When you wear armor, your Agility rating is capped due to the armor’s bulk (this affects your energy pool, adding dice to attacks, using the Dodge action, etc):
    Body Armor: Type I Weave limits your Agility to: ????? ?
    Body Armor: Type II Mesh limits your Agility to: ?????
    Body Armor: Type III Composite limits your Agility to: ????
    Body Armor: Type IV Polymer limits your Agility to: ???
    Body Armor: Type V Nano-Weave limits your Agility to: ?? If your Strength rating or Armor Training rating is lower than the rating of your worn armor, then for each action or reaction you must spend ? extra energy and your Agility rating is effectively 1 less than its rating.

    Shields Equipment (Shield Training) Energy Cost (Spent) Shield Rating (Defense Dice Gained) ?

    Deflection Shield ? ??
    Kinetic Shield ??? ???
    Plasma Shield ???? If your Strength rating or Shield Training rating is lower than the rating of your wielded shield, then the energy cost of using your shield is increased by ?. Actions and externalities: Wield Shield: When defending an attack against your PD, you can spend energy to pay the cost of a shield you wield, and your PD pool gains bonus dice equal to your shield’s rating Firearms and Thrown Weapons (Sci-Fi) Assault Rifle Weapons Equipment (Long Guns) Energy Cost (Spent) Weapon Rating (Attack Dice Gained) ??
    Laser Assault Rifle (10-100’) 2H, SA, BF, FA ?
    Plasma Assault Rifle (10-50’) 2H, SA, BF, FA ?? ???
    Ion Assault Rifle (10-100’) 2H, SA, BF, FA ????? 2H: Two-Handed SA: Semi-Auto BF: Burst Fire FA: Full Auto All assault rifles require two hands to use. Assault rifle battery packs hold approximately:
    Laser assault rifle: 30 charges
    Plasma assault rifle: 24 charges
    Ion assault rifle: 20 charges All assault rifles support the semi-automatic fire mode, SA, where a single shot is fired with each trigger pull. Some also support three-round bursts, BF, where three shots are discharged for each trigger pull. Finally, some offer full-automatic mode, FA, where the rifle will continue firing while the trigger is held and it still has charge. Burst fire generally uses three charges, while full-automatic uses around 10 charges. Assault rifles gain further bonus dice when used braced or on a bipod/tripod, or when augmented with a scope or laser sight (or both). Assault rifle weapons can attack targets up to five times their range. Actions and externalities: Range: Target’s defense pool gains ?? when inside weapon’s range and gains ?? for each range increment beyond the weapon’s range Braced: Gain ? bonus dice when braced (Prone or on a support) Tripod: Gain ?? bonus dice when using a bipod or tripod Scope: Gain ?? bonus dice when using a scope (SA/BF only) Laser Sight: Gain ?? bonus dice for a laser sight (SA/BF only) Burst Fire: Spend ? extra energy and gain ??? bonus dice Full-Auto: Spend ??? extra energy, gain ???? bonus dice, and attack all targets within a 15-45º lateral arc Swap Pack: Spend ??? to change battery packs Blaster Weapons Equipment (Small Guns) Energy Cost (Spent) Weapon Rating (Attack Dice Gained) ?
    Laser Blaster (10-30’) SA ?
    Plasma Blaster (10-20’) SA ?? ??
    Proton Blaster (10-30’) SA ???
    Ion Blaster (10-35’) 2H, SA ????? 2H: Two-Handed SA: Semi-Auto BF: Burst Fire Blasters generally require a single hand to wield. However, heavier examples require two hands to fire effectively. Depending on the specific gun, they may offer single-shot, semi-automatic, and burst fire modes. Blaster battery packs hold approximately:
    Laser blaster: 12 charges
    Plasma blaster: 10 charges
    Proton blaster: 8 charges
    Ion blaster: 6 charges Blaster weapons can attack targets up to three times their range. Actions and externalities: Range: Target’s defense pool gains ?? when inside weapon’s range and gains ?? for each range increment beyond the weapon’s range Burst Fire: Spend ? extra energy and gain ??? bonus dice Swap Pack: Spend ??? to change battery packs Explosive Weapons Equipment (Thrown Weapons) Energy Cost (Spent) Weapon Rating (Attack Dice Gained) ???
    Nano-Swarm Grenade (0-30’) PP ??
    Stun Grenade (0-30’) PP, CC ??
    Plasma Grenade (0-50’) PP ????
    Ion Grenade (0-50’) PP ????? ?
    Anti-Matter Grenade (0-50’) PP ????? ??? LF: Light Fuze PP: Primer Pin IT: Impact Trigger CC: Concussion Explosive weapons are wielded in the main hand, and it is a minor action to draw another explosive weapon. Explosive weapons are thrown at a target or a 5’x5’ space where they explode, making martial ranged attacks all targets within the blast radius. The blast radius for explosive weapons is 5’ for each rating. Explosive weapons can attack targets up to twice their range. Actions and externalities: Range: Target’s defense pool gains ?? for each range increment beyond the weapon’s range Light Fuze: Spend ??? to light a Molotov cocktail cloth or burning fuze Priming Pin: Spend ? to press a grenade’s priming pin Machinegun Weapons Equipment (Heavy Guns) Energy Cost (Spent) Weapon Rating (Attack Dice Gained) ??*
    Laser Machinegun (10-100’) 2H, FA ???* ???*
    Plasma Machinegun (10-100’) 2H, FA ?????* ????*
    Ion Machinegun (10-100’) 2H, FA ????? ??* FA: Full Auto 2H: Two-Handed All machineguns require two hands to use. Machine guns can only fire full-automatic mode, FA, where the gun continues firing while the trigger is held and it still has charge. The energy costs marked with * are the base cost for these weapons, and to operate these weapons the full-auto spend cost must also be paid. The rating of these weapons marked with * also indicates the base dice gained, as additional full-auto dice are also gained to the attack pool. Machine guns use high-capacity battery packs that are not compatible with normal battery packs. These packs hold charges for approximately 4-6 full-auto bursts. Machinegun weapons can attack targets up to five times their range. Actions and externalities: Range: Target’s defense pool gains ?? when inside weapon’s range and gains ?? for each range increment beyond the weapon’s range Full-Auto: Spend ??? extra energy, gain ???? bonus dice, and attack all targets within a 15-45º lateral arc Tripod: Gain ?? bonus dice when using a bipod/tripod Swap Hi=Pack: Spend ????? to change high-capacity battery packs Rifle Weapons Equipment (Long Guns) Energy Cost (Spent) Weapon Rating (Attack Dice Gained) ??
    Light Laser Rifle (15-200’) 2H, SA ?
    Light Plasma Rifle (15-200’) 2H, SA ?? ???
    Light Ion Rifle (15-200’) 2H, SA ????
    Heavy Laser Rifle (20-500’) 2H, SA ????? ????
    Heavy Plasma Rifle (20-500’) 2H, SA ????? ?? ?????
    Heavy Ion Rifle (20-500’) 2H, SA ????? ???? SA: Semi-Auto 2H: Two-Handed All rifles require two hands to use. Each rifle weapon uses varying amounts of charge from the battery pack:
    Light laser rifle battery packs: 12 charges
    Light plasma rifle packs: 8 charges
    Light ion rifle packs: 6 charges
    Heavy laser rifle battery packs: 8 charges
    Heavy plasma rifle packs: 6 charges
    Heavy ion rifle packs: 4 charges Rifle weapons can attack targets up to five times their range, and up to 10 times their range with appropriate equipment (scope, support, etc). Actions and externalities: Range: Target’s defense pool gains ?? when inside weapon’s range and gains ?? for each range increment beyond the weapon’s range Tripod: Gain ?? bonus dice when using a bipod or tripod Braced: Gain ? bonus dice when properly braced against a solid surface Scope: Gain ?? bonus dice when using a scope Laser Sight: Gain ?? bonus dice for a laser sight Swap Pack: Spend ??? to change battery packs Scatter Weapons Equipment (Long Guns) Energy Cost (Spent) Weapon Rating (Attack Dice Gained) ??
    Plasma Scattergun (5-15’) 2H, BL ??
    Disruptor Scattergun (5-15’) 2H, BL ??
    Sonic Scattergun (5-15’) 2H, BL ?? ???
    Ion Scattergun (5-15’) 2H, BL ????? 2H: Two-Handed All scatterguns require two hands to use. Scatterguns use normal battery packs:
    Plasma, Disruptor and Sonic scattergun battery packs: 8 charges
    Ion scattergun battery packs: 6 charges Blast fire uses two charges, and then sends a wide blast of energy at all targets in its attack arc. Scatterguns often come in special energy types, such as:
    Disruptor: Deals electromagnetic damage
    Sonic: Deals sonic damage Scattergun weapons can attack targets up to two times their range. Actions and externalities: Range: Target’s defense pool gains ?? for each range increment beyond the weapon’s range Blast Fire: Spend ? extra energy, use two charges, and attack all targets within a roughly 15-30º lateral arc Swap Pack: Spend ??? to change battery packs Melee, Finesse, and Unarmed Weapons (Sci-Fi) Finesse Weapons Equipment (Finesse Weapons) Energy Cost (Spent) Weapon Rating (Attack Dice Gained) ??
    Vibro-Knife ? ???
    Monofilament Whip/Ion Seax ??? Melee Weapons Equipment (Melee Weapons) Energy Cost (Spent) Weapon Rating (Attack Dice Gained) ??
    Vibro-Knife ? ???
    Riot Baton ??
    Stun-Baton/Ion Axe 1H ???
    Ion Axe 2H ???? ????
    Ion Sword 1H ?????
    Ion Sword 2H ????? ?
    Ion Greatsword 2H ????? ?? 1H: One-Handed 2H: Two-Handed Melee weapons require one or two hands to wield. Some weapons, such as ion swords, can be used one or two handed, with different ratings.

    Unarmed Weapons Equipment (Brawling, Martial Arts) Energy Cost (Spent) Weapon Rating (Attack Dice Gained) ??

    Punch/Kick ?
    Plasma Gauntlets ? ???
    Sparring Gloves ?
    NEW PAGE Game Mastering

    Genres And Worlds

    The Forge Engine role-playing system supports multiple game genres, including fantasy, modern, and even sci-fi. The system also allows you to mix and match the elements that typify each of these genres, for example by combining magic and modern weapons for a warped take on Vietnam, or by using historical equipment and sci-fi weapons for a Princess of Mars pulp romp. For the sake of simplicity, the possibility space of role-playing game genres can be mapped across two axes, one continuum from realistic to fantasy, and the second a timeline from the past through the present to the future. Fantasy Hybrid Realistic Past:

    • High Fantasy
    • Low Fantasy
    • Weird West
    • Historical Medieval
    • Historical Renaissance

    Western Present:

    • Supers
    • Urban Fantasy
    • Zombie Apocalypse
    • Modern

    Post-Apocalyptic Future:

    • Space Opera
    • Hard Sci-Fi

    The following pages provide overviews of just a few of the massive range of genres supported by the Forge Engine.

    High Fantasy High fantasy is the genre of floating castles, dueling wizards, ferocious monsters, and valiant heroes. Such adventures are usually set in idealized pastoral societies in medieval worlds.

    No high fantasy story is complete without a glimpse of the wonderful, whether it’s magic used for mundane ends, flying carpets, or the crumbling relics of lost civilizations.

    Key Themes

    • Order versus chaos
    • Good versus evil
    • Heroism
    • Wonder

    Abundant

    • Magic
    • Monsters
    • Non-human races

    Rare

    • Poverty and scarcity
    • Absolute death

    Absent

    • Firearms

    Inspiration

    • Dungeons & Dragons
    • Game of Thrones

    Genre-Specific Tweaks

    High Fantasy games are close to the default for Forge Engine. However, a few tweaks to the system may emphasize the key characteristics of this genre.

    • Magic trait cost reduced (such as to 1 CP)
    • Health increased (all characters have the Sturdy trait for free)

    Low Fantasy and Historical Medieval Low fantasy and historical medieval games are very similar, with the key difference being the setting and the presence or absence of magic. Low fantasy stories explore alternate worlds and may have some magical elements, while historical medieval games take place in our world and have very little (if any) magic. Where magic is present, it is often closely linked with corruption and evil.

    Key Themes

    • Changing world
    • Battle of cultures
    • Heroic sacrifice
    • Moral relativism

    Abundant

    • War and conflict

    Rare

    • Magic

    Absent

    • Non-human races
    • Firearms

    Inspiration

    • Conan
    • Fafhrd and the Grey Mouser
    • King Arthur
    • Robin Hood
    • The 13th Warrior
    • Kingdom of Heaven
    • Vikings

    Genre-Specific Tweaks

    Low and historical fantasy stories require only minor tweaks to Forge Engine:

    • Increase cost of magic traits (e.g. to 5 CP)
    • Human characters only

    Renaissance

    Renaissance games are set in a golden age of sail, where dashing heroes live out tales of derring-do. Our swashbuckling heroes are as often as not operating afoul of the law, or are themselves agents of the law who may be on the run from corrupt superiors. Adventures set in this era also include some of the earliest black powder firearms; flintlock pistols and rifles, fused bombs, and devastating canons.

    Renaissance stories sometimes incorporate magical or fantasy elements in the midst of their historically-inspired tales.

    Key Themes

    • Corrupt authorities
    • Honor and valor
    • Romance

    Abundant

    • Rip-roaring action

    Rare

    • Magic

    Absent

    • Nothing really (we’re all in here)

    Inspiration

    • Master and Commander
    • Pirates of the Caribbean
    • The Three Musketeers
    • Black Sails
    • Temeraire

    Genre-Specific Tweaks

    The inclusion of early firearms in renaissance games is a great opportunity to use a single all-encompassing skill for all such weapons: Firearms Basic Martial Skill (Bonus) When you make a ranged attack with a firearm, your action pool gains ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Firearms rating. Range penalties, reload costs, and additional specific costs and bonuses (such as weapon fire modes), are detailed in the equipment section.

    Modern

    The modern or contemporary role-playing genre encompasses modern-day technology and weapons. The genre is time bounded, with a fuzzy emergence from historical role-playing somewhere around the middle of the 20th century, and then blending seamlessly into hard sci-fi or cyberpunk in the decades ahead.

    Modern games occur in our contemporary age (or another clearly defined time period) and use the period’s technology, politics, and physical geography. Much like modern life, the antagonists in modern games are human, robbing the genre of the easy evil of fantasy monsters. Except for Nazis. Fuck Nazis.

    Key Themes

    • Terrorist or freedom fighter?
    • Western meddling broke this
    • Making things better or worse?
    • Collateral damage

    Abundant

    • Firearms
    • Terrorists, radicals, and zealots

    Rare

    • Absolute good or evil

    Absent

    • Magic

    Inspiration

    • Black Hawk Down
    • First Blood
    • Shooter
    • Lone Survivor
    • The Unit
    • Red Dawn

    Genre-Specific Tweaks

    Modern games are heavy on tactical military fetishism. The suite of skills, modern firearms, and equipment are the primary genre-specific additions for these games. Additionally, some skills require additional thought for modern games. For example, the difficult of piloting a modern airliner is significantly higher than driving a horse cart.

    Urban Fantasy The urban fantasy or modern fantasy setting brings fantastic elements into the modern world. These fantasy elements might be magic, aliens, or the supernatural. This crossover peels back the thin veneer of modern life to expose the weirdness hiding underneath. This weirdness might be aliens, such as in Men In Black, supernatural terrors, Supernatural, Delta Green, or Stranger Things, or even vampires, True Blood. Despite the name, the genre is not strictly city-bound. Urban fantasy games work effectively in small town or rural settings, where the themes of the genre resonate.

    Key Themes

    • Unnatural in the shadows
    • Underlying horror of modern life
    • Alienation from modern society

    Abundant

    • Modern technology
    • Fantasy (magic, supernatural)

      Rare

      • Mundane adventures

      Absent

      • Nothing

      Inspiration

      • The Dresden Files
      • Delta Green
      • Stranger Things
      • The X-Files
      • The Light and Darkness War

      Genre-Specific Tweaks

      Characters in urban fantasy games often work with police or government agencies: Bureaucracy Skill Gain bonus dice when making Intelligence (Bureaucracy) tests to understand or navigate bureaucratic processes.

      Law Enforcement Skill Gain bonus dice when making Influence (Law Enforcement) or Intelligence (Law Enforcement) tests to interact with law enforcement officers or understand law enforcement processes.

      Post-Apocalypse Post-apocalyptic games explore the aftermath of a civilization-destroying event. The event might be a cataclysm (meteor strike or a volcanic eruption), climatologically (global warning or shutdown of the thermohaline circulation), or man-made (runaway nanomachines, nuclear winter, bio-weapons, or chemical warfare). Regardless of the cause, a large percentage of the human race is killed, the means of production are destroyed, society collapses, and the survivors roam the land trying to survive. In the midst of this destruction, the survivors are challenged to question the lengths to which they will go to survive and whether a community can rebuild from the ashes.

      Key Themes

      • Physical and moral decay
      • Nature of humanity
      • Humans are the real monsters

      Abundant

      • Useless artifacts of modern life
      • Crazed humans

      Rare

      • Resources (food, ammunition)
      • Moments of happiness and levity

      Absent

      • Magic
      • Bicycles

      Inspiration

      • The Road
      • Mad Max
      • A Canticle For Leibowitz
      • Fallout

      Genre-Specific Tweaks

      The unique themes of scarcity and decay in post-apocalypse games make it ideal to incorporate skills that emphasize a character’s ability to scrounge for useful items amongst the decaying ruins of the lost society: Scavenge Skill Gain bonus dice when making Acuity (Scavenge) tests to find useful or valuable items amongst debris and disorder.

      Zombie Apocalypse The zombie apocalypse is a very specific type of apocalypse; one where the dead don’t stay dead. Whether it’s because hell is full or a due to a post-mortem neurological virus (the ‘rage’ virus), the world is overrun by shambling (or sprinting) zombies. And it’s only a matter of time before they win.

      Zombie apocalypse games are similar in theme and setting to a standard post-apocalyptic game, but with the added ingredient of an endless supply of mindless guilt-free fodder.

      Key Themes

      • Humanity
      • Community
      • Humans are the real monsters

      Abundant

      • Zombies

      Rare

      • Resources (food, ammunition)

      Absent

      • Magic

      Inspiration

      • The Walking Dead
      • World War Z
      • Zombieland
      • Dawn of the Dead

      Genre-Specific Tweaks

      Genres like this give GMs the opportunity to introduce cool new mechanics to the game: Infection Resistance Each character has an Infection Resistance rating (? to ????? and higher). When the character is created this rating is equal to the character’s Stamina rating. When the character takes melee damage from an infected, they must make a Stamina (Infection Resistance) test at difficulty 8. If they fail this test, their Infection Resistance rating decreases by ?. If this would reduce their rating to 0, the character ‘turns’ and becomes infected; a mindless zombie with a ravenous craving for human flesh. When the character takes a long rest, their Infection Resistance rating increases by ?, up to their Stamina rating.

      Space Opera

      A long time ago… or maybe it’s the far future. Either way, somewhere in the future or past, or possibly the present, in the distant reaches of space (although not necessarily in our universe), there is a great war between good and evil. There are also space ships, death planets, and laser swords. And anthropomorphized animals. And scoundrels. And some kind of magical power.

      Pretty much the only thing missing is adherence to the physical laws of the universe. Spaceships fly like airplanes, presumably through invisible aether, and shoot snail-slow laser bolts.

      Key Themes

      • Good versus evil
      • Tyranny versus freedom
      • Pulpy adventure in space

      Abundant

      • Technology
      • Cannon fodder ‘stormtroopers’
      • Magic-like powers (the Force)

      Rare

      • Adherence to science
      • Moral ambiguity

      Absent

      • Gravity

      Inspiration

      • Star Wars
      • John Carter of Mars
      • The Fifth Element
      • Firefly
      • Guardians of the Galaxy

      Genre-Specific Skills

      Energy Weapons Basic Martial Skill (Bonus) When you make a ranged attack with an energy weapon, your action pool gains ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Energy Weapons rating. Range penalties, reload costs, and additional specific costs and bonuses (such as weapon fire modes), are detailed in the equipment section.

      Hard Sci-Fi Hard sci-fi projects the characters into the future, and then binds them within the physics-based universe of gravity, momentum, and reactions. These future universes might be futuristic gleaming utopias of Star Trek, the gritty street level of Blade Runner, or the solar-system-spanning intrigue of The Expanse.

      In these stories, the characters might explore worlds just making first contact with aliens. Or worlds struggling to reconcile the power imbalance of colonized planets. Or desolate planets where colonists find new dangers. In hard sci-fi games, these worlds are real. They obey our universal laws of physics. They react to our actions.

      Key Themes

      • Geopolitical
      • Clash of cultures
      • Alien contact
      • Realistic depiction of science

      Abundant

      • Technology

      Rare

      • Moral absolutism

      Absent

      • Magic and fantasy

      Inspiration

      • The Expanse
      • Aliens
      • Blade Runner
      • District 9
      • Avatar

      Genre-Specific Skills

      Let’s do this: Zero-G Skill Gain bonus dice when making Agility (Zero-G) tests to perform actions in zero or micro-gravity environments.

      Encounter Types

      The GM’s tool-box includes five major types of encounters, each with different engagement, challenges, and rewards.

      Types of Encounters

      The main types of encounters in the GM’s repertoire are:

      • Exploration
      • Puzzles
      • Traps
      • Role-playing
      • Combat

      Exploration

      At the highest level, exploration reflects the players’ decisions about how their characters interact with the world. These choices guide and drive the story. Do they take the road to the distant crumbling city, strike off the road into the foreboding forest, or enter the saloon, or follow up on a dangling plot hook. Exploration is the scaffolding of the entire story, from which all of the other types of encounters hang. Character’s choices may take them into a puzzle, or combat, or a trap.

      Puzzles

      Puzzles provide GMs with an encounter that’s an interesting alternative to straight combat. Usually a puzzle encounter must be solved to offer progress, but sometimes players will be totally stumped by the puzzle, so alternative routes need to be available. However, some gaming groups find it hard to engage with puzzles, and these encounters can be hard to design effectively.

      Traps

      It’s important here to make a distinction between incidental traps that players encounter in the course of normal exploration and traps that are an encounter in themselves. Trap encounters are similar to puzzles, except they’re trying to kill the players. Having said that, these encounters have many of the same problems as puzzle encounters (such as players not getting how to ‘solve’ them), but the addition of life-threatening danger makes them doubly-risky.

      Role-Playing

      In role-playing encounters, the players play out their characters’ interactions with game characters. These encounters ideally offer players alternate possible outcomes, depending on the result of the interactions.

      Combat

      Combat encounters are the bread and butter of RPGs, and it’s the GM’s job to ensure these encounters are interesting, meaningful, and grounded.

      Rewards from Encounters

      Part of the GM’s job is to design and offer rewards from encounters.

      Achievement

      It takes an extraordinary GM to reward players with a sense of achievement. Having said that, a sense of achievement is something that players get when they overcome an encounter where they think there is a chance of failure.

      Resources

      The distribution of wealth, equipment, or special items is something that players often anticipate at the end of encounters.

      Information

      Role-playing encounters and even combat encounters can reward players with information that is valuable to their goals or quests.

      Favor

      Depending on the cause and outcome of the encounter, the characters could find themselves with the passing or eternal gratitude of a game character. Perhaps the characters were hired by a noble to rescue his comely daughter from a handsome rake before he can despoil her? Alternatively, perhaps the characters (with no great intent) managed to thwart a robbery, abduction, swindle, or assassination and gained the appreciation of the target.

      Passage

      Often the encounter is a literal or figurative obstacle for the characters’ progress. Sometimes the ravine is blocked by an orcish encampment, the dungeon door is held fast by a complicated lock or finally, there are times when the way is blocked by a mischievous spirit who challenges the party to solve a riddle. In each of these cases the reward for the encounter is continued progress.

      Combat Encounter Design

      The combat encounter is one of the foundational elements of role-playing games. Unlike other encounter types, combat allows players to experience danger and excitement and victory that we don’t get in everyday life. As such, there will likely be many calls for combat encounters, and each of these has a different context, motivations, locations, and adversaries.

      Why We Fight?

      No two campaigns are the same and not two gaming groups are the same. Between these, there are infinite reasons for adventuring parties to get into fights, such as:

      • Characters want something the adversaries’ have
      • The adversaries are blocking the characters’ path
      • The adversaries have something the characters need (key, item, shelter, etc)
      • The adversaries have ambushed the party
      • The adversaries are endangering common folk
      • It’s a cruel and hateful world overflowing with the vile denizens of chaos

        What’s At Stake?

        One thing to consider for a combat encounter is what’s at stake, other than the lives of the combatants. Are the groups fighting just for the sake of it, or is there something in play? One way ensure a combat encounter is meaningful is to add another element that raises the stakes, such as:

        • Rescue a prisoner the adversaries are trying to evacuate
        • Protecting a target that assassins are trying to kill
        • Changing or deteriorating topography
        • Preventing the adversaries from completing a ritual, project, or activity
        • Fighting to gain (or keep) possession of an object (such as a key or any artifact)
        • Trying to perform a specific action in the midst of a larger combat, such as to gain or hold a position

          Number of Adversaries

          When creating a combat encounter, the GM’s first consideration is often the number of adversaries that the players face. In considering this, the GM may have a particular type of encounter in mind, such as a fight against one powerful adversary, a large battle against lots of easily-defeated minions, or a band of enemies that the characters can’t hope to defeat in normal combat.

          Adversary Mix

          The Forge Engine makes it easy for the GM to mix up the type of adversaries that the characters face. These adversaries, whether they’re normal humans, mystical creatures, or exotic aliens, can be easily scaled in power and role to present characters with a range of threats and tactics even within a single type of adversary. When combining multiple types of adversaries, the GM needs to keep in mind the practicalities and motivations for the alliance.

        • Is one adversary type subordinate to the other?
        • Are these all intelligent adversaries working together?
        • Do the groups normally work together?
        • Have they been temporarily thrown together by circumstances? So by all means mix up the adversaries, but make the alliance make sense.

          Encounter Difficulty

          The difficulty of an encounter is easily established in Forge Engine. First, add up the maximum energy of the player characters, and then compare this to the total maximum energy to the adversaries. The comparison of these numbers tells the GM the difficult of an encounter. For example, if four player characters with 10 energy (40 energy) face six adversaries each with 8 energy (48 energy), then this will be a difficult encounter. By following the described steps, the GM can create encounters that are:

          • Easy relative to the characters’ strength
          • Balanced relative to the characters’ strength
          • Hard relative to the characters’ strength
          • Fixed difficulty
          Easy, balanced, and hard encounters allow the GM to control the pace of the character’s adventures and to increase the tension of the session or story. Using fixed difficulty encounters is an old-school technique. This is especially useful in sandbox style adventures where the players can tackle encounters at their own pace. In this style of play, the GM may want certain of those encounters to be too hard for the characters and others to be potentially easy or balanced, depending on the order that the players choose to have their characters tackle them.

          Encounters for Low Power Characters Encounters for characters with low power are more susceptible to the vagaries of random dice rolls. When this is combined with inexperienced players (who aren’t familiar with the rules and their character’s capabilities), it’s a recipe for unpredictable or disastrous outcomes. In this situation it’s best to make sure that the encounter is slightly lower difficulty than normal or that it’s apparent to the players that they are outclassed and should consider alternate approaches.

          Individual Adversary Strength Take care when using adversaries with significantly more energy than the player characters, especially when the characters have lower amounts of energy (e.g. less than 10). These adversaries hit more often and deal comparatively high damage; just a couple of attacks from a strong adversary can KO a low-power character outright. This combination of high hit probabilities, high damage, and lower chance of the characters landing a strike in return, makes these adversaries very dangerous.

          Running Combat Encounters

          Getting Into Combat

          The transition from ‘adventuring’ to combat can happen in many ways. Sometimes it’s planned as part of a story or adventure, other times it happens when the players do something unexpected.

        • Characters kick in the door of a room where they have heard noises
        • Players set their characters in ambush of approaching adversaries
        • GM rolls a random encounter for characters travelling overland or in a city
        • Characters overpower the guards of a shop or temple that they want to loot
        • A character’s pick-pocketing attempt on a game character fails badly
        • Adversaries come across the party, potentially surprising everyone
        • The characters botch an attribute test, drawing nearby adversaries to their location

        Determining Surprise

        Surprise can occur when one of the groups of combatants is not immediately expecting to be attacked. This can even mean that a character who is ‘on guard’ can be surprised by a sufficiently stealthy or unexpected attack. Surprise is generally determined with an opposed attribute test, but the GM may decide a fixed difficult is more appropriate:

        • Opposed test: Acuity (Perception) vs Agility (Stealth)
        • Set difficulty: Acuity (Perception) vs difficulty

        The opposed test introduces some variability into the determination of surprise, but the Forge Engine’s opposed dice pools mean that the larger dice pool will usually prevail. The second method allows the GM to set the difficult directly.

        Tactics

        Depending on their experience, a party’s tactics can range from effective to ineffective. This also extends to individual players, who can play optimally or sub-optimally. The single most effective player tactic is to pick off adversaries one at a time, aiming to reduce the number of enemies as quickly as possible. Depending on how difficult the GM is aiming for the encounter to be, they may need to support, negate, or counter the players’ tactics.

        Adjusting Difficulty on the Fly

        It’s not too late to adjust the difficulty of an encounter until all of the characters are dead on the ground (and even then…). Once the encounter is in progress, you can progressively adjust the difficulty up or down to take into account unexpected situations:

        • Exceptionally good or bad rolls
        • Exceptionally good or bad tactics
        • Miscalculated difficulty

        Here are a few ideas to make encounters harder:

        • Introduce another wave of adversaries (if possible)
        • Concentrate the adversaries’ attacks on key characters, like the coordinating commanders, fantasy healers, or powerful fighters

        And a few to make encounters easier:

        • Spread adversaries’ attacks amongst multiple player and game characters
        • Make the adversaries’ leaders flee when threatened or significantly damaged
        • Give the adversaries morale tests (Intelligence (Insight) vs difficulty target) if the leader dies or flees
        • Don’t use the adversaries’ specialized combat skills

        Ending the Combat

        Not all combats should run to the total death of one of the groups (especially if it’s the player characters’ party).

        To the Death

        Some groups will fight to the death; humans defending their families, animals defending their territory or lairs.

        Morale

        Intelligent characters ” generally humans and humanoids, but also creatures like dragons ” will be mindful of their strategic position in combat. If they are losing (outnumbered, outskilled, or outwitted), then there is a chance that they will flee to save their own lives. This chance of fleeing is increased if their leader is killed or has fled.

        Fleeing

        Natural animals are usually looking for a quick and easy meal, so they prefer to flee if the combat is going bad for them.

        Surrender

        In some cases, characters will surrender rather than flee in combat. This can be a risky proposition when the player characters are merciless.

        Capture

        In rare cases, the player characters or their opponents will be striving to capture, rather than kill, the other.

        Running Away In Combat

        In many cases player characters or game characters will try to vacate the combat area, pronto. Although there are no specific rules for how to handle combatants who try to flee, here are a few ideas for how a GM can rule these attempts. If characters in melee range want to stop the other combatant from fleeing, then the GM could run an opposed attribute test for the attempted escape. The prospective escapee rolls a Strength or Agility attribute test. The characters trying to stop the escapee all then attempt to match or beat that roll with their own Strength or Agility tests. If the escapee’s roll is matched or beaten, then the move is stopped, and the escape is prevented. Depending on initiative order, the escapee might attempt to break away when the surrounding characters have used their energy. In this instance, the GM could resolve the retreat first as an opposed Strength (Athletics) or Agility (Acrobatics) attribute test.

        Pursuits

        If the characters or adversaries attempt to pursue their opponents, then it’s best to use an opposed Stamina (Endurance) attribute test, rather than attempting to adjudicate a 5’ by 5’ move by move situation. When resolving these opposed tests, then pursuit ties are adjudicated as the status quo (i.e. both groups move the same distance), outright successes mean that individual or group moves some distance closer or further from the other.

        Total Party Kill

        Sometimes a combat goes very badly for the characters, and you might not want to wipe them out entirely. First, ask these questions:

        • If it looks like a TPK is coming, can the enemies demand they surrender?
        • Are the characters dead-dead, or just unconscious or dying, for easy capture?
        • Did anyone escape who could attempt a rescue?
        • Do they have allies nearby who could help?
        • If there are surviving enemies, would/could they keep the characters alive?
        • Are there other characters/spirits/enemies/allies that could save the characters?
        • What would the adversaries do with the characters; ransom them, force them to undertake some task for their lives?
        • Do they have the favor of their gods, benefactors, or higher powers?
        • Do the dead-dead characters want to start new characters?
        • Do the surviving characters have enough resources or the capability themselves to magically resurrect the dead characters or rush them to a nearby hospital?

        Rewards And Progression

        Character points (CP) are used to track the progress of characters through their adventures. Character points allow players to develop their characters’ attributes and skills, which in turn increase the characters’ energy pool, increase their health, and increase the effectiveness of their actions as well as broadening the situations in which they can use their actions. Character points are gained by overcoming enemies in combat, solving puzzles, negotiating with adversarial game characters, and completing missions or quests. Bonus character points are also available to players for exceptional role-playing and for having their characters tackle multiple encounters in a game day.

        Gaining Character Points

        Generally speaking, character points are awarded at the end of each session to reward players for defeating (or otherwise overcoming) adversaries, for solving puzzles, for escaping or disarming traps, for negotiating with or overcoming adversarial game characters, for completing quests or missions, and just plain showing up. Character points are normally awarded at the end of the session:

        • 2 CP per character per session

        Alternatively, if you wish to accelerate the development of the player characters:

        • 3 CP per character per session

        Furthermore, if the characters achieve a significant milestone, such as completing a quest or mission, they could also gain further CP:

        • 2 CP per character for completing a minor quest or mission
        • 4 CP per character for completing a major quest or mission
        • 6 CP per character for completing a complete campaign

        Bonus Character Points

        Bonus character points can be awarded by the GM to reward specific ‘meta’ player actions in the game, such as overcoming multiple combat encounters in a single game day or exceptional role-playing interactions with game characters or other player characters.

        Bonus Combat CP

        To encourage players to press on with their adventures (and discourage them from taking a full day rest after each combat encounter), bonus character points can be awarded for subsequent combat encounters after the first on a single day. Example bonus combat CP:

        • For tackling multiple hazardous combat encounters in a single game day
        • Engage in risky combat encounters when injured or with expended energy

          Bonus Role-Playing CP

          Sometimes a player will go above and beyond in the role-playing of their character when interacting with game characters or the other player characters. This may include really living out the character’s individual traits, background and goals to bring the adventurer to life. Good role-playing should be rewarded, and a good reward is bonus character points. By its nature, bonus character points are given to reinforce player behaviors that should be encouraged. Here are some examples of behaviors to reward:

          • Role-playing character and racial traits
          • Role-playing a character’s background
          • Role-playing a character’s rights and wrongs
          • Utilizing a character’s unique skills to achieve goals

            Example bonus role-playing character points include:

            • 1 CP awarded to players who role-play their characters exceptionally well

            When to Award Bonus XP

            When giving bonus character points, try to do the following:

            • Award the character points as quickly as possible after the behavior
            • First reward the behavior consistently (every time)
            • Transition from consistent rewards to random rewards

              For example, for each encounter, roll a d10 for each player exhibiting the behavior reward them on a 6 or higher. Then increase the difficulty target to 7 after a few encounters. Finally, settle on a difficulty target of 8 for each player to determine whether to reward them.

              Running Attribute Tests

              When running attribute tests, there are a number of steps:

              • Determine the type of test (fixed or opposed)
              • Determine the appropriate attribute(s)
              • Set the difficulty number (for fixed tests)
              • Resolve the test

              Fixed or Opposed Tests

              Fixed attribute tests are those where the challenge is against a static challenge, such as to climb a wall. Whereas opposed attribute tests are those where two game characters are opposed to each other.

              Appropriate Attributes

              Strength Tests

              • Jump over a gap (Athletics)
              • Lift or throw something heavy (Athletics)
              • Climb up a rope (Athletics)
              • Smash through a door (Athletics)
              • Swim across a river (Athletics)
              • Get information from someone through threats (Intimidation)

                Agility Tests

                • Move silently or stealthily (Stealth)
                • Disable a mechanical trap or pick a lock (Thievery)
                • Escape from bonds (Thievery/Acrobatics)
                • Dodge a deadfall trap (Acrobatics)
                • Run quickly through a crowd (Acrobatics)
                • Hit a small target with a throw or shot (Ranged Weapons/Thrown Weapons)
                • Pick a pocket or cut a purse (Thievery)
                • Ride a horse (Ride)

                  Stamina Tests

                  • Run for several hours (Endurance)
                  • Drink competitively (Resist)
                  • Survive a short time in an inferno or freezing location (Endurance)
                  • Overcome poison (Resist)
                  • Endure tear gas (Resist)
                  • Recover from an illness or disease (Resist)
                  • Survive a prolonged time in a desert or frozen tundra (Endurance)

                    Influence Tests

                    • Calm frightened person (Leadership/Persuasion)
                    • Negotiate with a hostile game character (Persuasion)
                    • Bluff or deceive (Deception)
                    • Etiquette to blend into in high society (Deception/Perform)
                    • Disguise yourself or impersonate someone (Deception)
                    • Lead a group of characters (Leadership)
                    • Gather information from strangers (Persuasion)
                    • Perform in front of an audience (Perform)
                    • Secure the favors of a handsome rake (Persuasion) Intelligence Tests
                    • Knowledge of science, lore, religion, or the arcane (Knowledge: Field)
                    • Knowledge of lore or history (History)
                    • Discern the source of a magic effect (Arcana)
                    • Understand languages (Language)
                    • Research a topic (Investigation)
                    • Search for a secret door or hidden treasure (Investigation)
                    • Solve a spatial, mathematic, or relationship puzzle (Investigation)
                    • Work out relationships between seemingly unrelated events (Investigation)

                      Acuity Tests

                      • Calm a spooked horse (Animal Handling)
                      • Notice a hidden trap or ambush (Perception)
                      • Know direction (Survival)
                      • Spot a character moving stealthily (Perception)
                      • Scan an area for threats or opportunities (Perception)
                      • Heal or treat a wound (First Aid)
                      • Track an enemy in dense woods (Survival)
                      • Determine whether a game character is lying (Insight)

                        Setting Difficulty

                        All fixed attribute tests require a difficulty target number, determined by the GM. These target numbers give a guide for the appropriate numbers to use for tasks:

                        Difficult Target

                        Easy ? Normal ? Hard ? Formidable «?

                        And for situations where the test needs to be challenging for even the most advanced character, you may require difficulty ratings in excess of the normal ? to «? range. In these extreme situations you can require two or more successes:

                        Difficult Target

                        Severe ? ? Extreme «? «? Resolving Attribute Tests

                        Fixed

                        Fixed attribute tests, those against static obstacles, are straightforward to adjudicate for their absolute success or failure. However, the interpretation of degrees of success for these tests offers some challenge. In these tests, one success may indicate the barest of success, while additional successes indicate that the character overcame the test more quickly or more comprehensively (such as by gaining more information).

                        Opposed

                        Opposed attribute tests are most simple when two characters are in opposition, and only the active character can succeed or ‘win’ the test. In this simple situation, the ‘instigator’ of the test is the only character that can achieve their desired outcome. For example, let’s imagine two characters on opposite sides of a perfectly normal door. One character tries to open the door, and the other tries to stop them. In this case, we have an opposed attribute test, probably Strength (Athletics) vs Strength (Athletics). Here, if the character trying to open the door achieves one or more successes, then that character succeeds in opening the door, and the other fails to stop them. The more elaborate version of the opposed attribute test occurs when two characters are trying to achieve an outcome that either of them can succeed. Both characters, the ‘instigator’ and the ‘reacter’, can achieve their outcome. So let’s imagine an arm wrestle between two characters. In such an arm wrestle, either character can win, or, possibly, there could even be a stalemate. In adjudicating an opposed attribute test like this, the character that has one or more dice higher than the other’s highest die achieves that number of successes. If the character’s highest dice are tied, then the GM can call a tie, or favor the instigator of the test (ties go to the instigator), or perform a count-back to each character’s next highest die.

                        Environmental Hazards

                        Interesting adventures take characters to unique locations, and challenge them with unusual and dangerous terrain features. While the characters can overcome these terrain features with simple attribute tests, the characteristics of these terrain features and hazards call for more nuanced use of attribute tests.

                        Climbing

                        When the terrain becomes too steep, characters must climb instead of walking. To climb a wall, characters make an Agility (Acrobatics) or Strength (Athletics) attribute test. The difficulty of this test is determined by the incline and smoothness of the surface. For example, a vertical wall with some handholds may be difficult 9, an overhanging wall with some handholds is difficult 10, and an overhanging wall with scarce handholds is difficulty 10/10 (requires two 10s to succeed). When making these attribute tests, characters climb 5’ for each success.

                        Cold and Heat

                        When characters are exposed to extreme heat or cold, their bodies rapidly fail. Each time characters spend an hour in extreme heat or cold, they must make a Stamina (Endurance) test at difficulty 8 (this can be adjusted for the intensity of the conditions). If the character fails the test, they first become both Enervated and Weakened. This test is repeated each hour the character is in the extreme conditions. The second time the character fails the test, they become both Exhausted and Enfeebled. The third time the character fails the test, their current health is reduced to -1 (if it is 0 or higher) and they are Dying (and Unconscious).

                        Difficult Terrain

                        Thick undergrowth, jagged rubble, or sucking mud are difficult terrain that hamper characters’ movement. The easiest way to handle these situations is to determine that characters are Slowed in difficult terrain. Alternatively, quick movement through difficult terrain can be determined by an Agility (Acrobatics) or Strength (Athletics) attribute test.

                        Explosions

                        Explosions are resolved as area attacks against all characters in their range. Characters caught in an explosion must make a standard PD defense roll against the explosion’s attack roll. The explosion’s attack roll will range from ?, «?, or «? (or more) dice, depending on the force of the explosion. When characters are at the fringe of the explosion, their defense pool gains ??.

                        Falling

                        Inevitably, characters will fall from some great height. This is one of the main hazards for brave but careless adventurers. Falling damage is based on the height that a character falls, and can be reduced with a successful attribute test.

                        Characters take 1 damage for each 10’ they fall. Characters can make an Agility (Acrobatics) test at difficulty 8 to reduce this damage. Each success reduces the damage by 1.

                        Fire

                        Damage from fire is based on the intensity of the fire; moderate, high, very high. Characters entering fire, or who stay in fire for more than a few seconds, take 1, 2, or 3 damage, based on the intensity of the fire. Characters can make a Stamina (Endurance) test at difficulty 8 to reduce this damage. The damage is reduced by 1 for each success.

                        Jumping

                        The environments that characters explore often include chasms, rooftops, tunnels, parapets, balconies, walkways, gantries, cave-ins, and towers. To jump across larger gaps, characters must succeed an attribute test. When trying to jump across a gap, characters make an Agility (Acrobatics) or Strength (Athletics) attribute test at difficulty 8. If the characters have no room to get a run up and instead make standing jump, the difficulty is increased to 10. Additionally, if their destination is higher than their origin, the difficulty is further increased. Similarly, if the destination is lower, the difficulty is reduced. The character jumps 5’ for each success, up to the rating of their Agility or Strength attribute (whichever they used). If the character falls short by just 5’, then they have hit the edge of their destination. When this happens, they can make another attribute test, Agility (Acrobatics) or Strength (Athletics) at difficulty 8, to prevent themselves from falling.

                        Suffocating and Drowning

                        Suffocation and downing do not damage characters like physical damage. Instead, these first render the characters weak, then unconscious, and then rapidly dead. Each time characters spend 30 seconds without oxygen, they must made a Stamina (Endurance) test at difficulty 8. If the character fails the test, they first become both Enervated and Weakened. This test is repeated each 30 seconds the character is without oxygen. The second time the character fails the test, they become both Exhausted and Enfeebled. The third time the character fails the test, their current health is reduced to -1 (if it is 0 or higher) and they are Dying (and Unconscious), Obviously, characters cannot be Stabilized while still without oxygen.

                        Water and Food

                        When characters are travelling over longer periods, they need food and water to keep their bodies in good working condition. When a character doesn’t have access to food or water for more than 24 hours, they first become Enervated and Weakened, and then Exhausted and Enfeebled. Each time characters spend 24 hours without food or water, they must made a Stamina (Endurance) test at difficulty 8. If the character fails the test, they first become both Enervated and Weakened. This test is repeated each 24 hours the character is without hydration and nourishment. The second time the character fails the test, they become both Exhausted and Enfeebled. The third time the character fails the test, their current health is reduced to -1 (if it is 0 or higher) and they are Dying (and Unconscious), If the character spends 4 days without water, they are automatically fail the first test. After 6 days without water, they are automatically fail the second test. After 8 days without water, they automatically fail the third test. Characters cannot remove these conditions until they have eaten and rehydrated.

                        Resolving Influence Tests

                        It can be difficult to judge the number of successes required for an opposed Influence test, so it helps to break down the challenge into three different factors:

                        • The disposition of the target to the instigating character
                        • The magnitude of the task
                        • The required number of successes for the opposed test to succeed

                          Disposition of Target

                          The first factor to consider, and hopefully the easiest, is the disposition of the target. Their disposition is simply their attitude to the character; are they friendly, are they just newly acquainted, are they rivals or perhaps enemies?

                        • Aligned: The target is very well known to the character, they share a common bond of trust and understanding. They go out of their way to support and progress the character’s goals.
                        • Associated: The target is associated with the character, and they are familiar, but not friend-friends. They support the character’s goals, especially when they align with their own.
                        • Neutral: The target is neutral towards the character, they are neither opposed or aligned with the character.
                        • Rival: The target is a rival of the character, they are antagonistic towards the character when their goals are in opposition.
                        • Enemy: The target is aggressively hostile towards the character, and will go out of their way to oppose and thwart the character’s goals and desires.

                          Magnitude of Task

                          • Trivial: The task is trivially achieved by the target, requiring minimal effort or cost, or involving an action that they are undertaking or plan to undertake; such as asking a small favor.
                          • Easy: The task is achieved with some reasonable effort, time, loss, or imposition on the target; such as performing or assisting in an errand, chore, or task, or lending a reasonable amount of money.
                          • Normal: The task requires a major effort, time commitment, loss, or imposition; such as lending a large amount of money, accompanying or someone for an extended period, or performing or assisting in a complicated, arduous, or prolonged task.
                          • Hard: The task requires significant effort or loss, or the possibility of real risk, danger, or loss of wealth or liberty; such as activities like robbery, blackmail, kidnapping, bribery, or extortion.
                          • Impossible: The task is risky, dangerous, and involves a significant risk of loss of life or liberty; such as murder, treason, mutiny, revolt, or insurgency.

                            Required Successes for Influence Tests

                            Having established both the disposition of the target and the magnitude of the task, the following table gives an idea of the number of successes that the instigating character needs to achieve on their opposed Influence test to succeed in convincing the target to perform the task. Disposition (below) Magnitude of Task: Trivial Easy Normal Hard Impossible Friendly None None 1 3 5 Familiar None 1 3 5 7 Neutral 1 3 5 7 9 Rival 3 5 7 9 11 Enemy 5 7 9 11 13

                            For example, convincing a friendly dragon (Friendly) to raze a village (Impossible) would require 5 successes, whereas convincing a hostile dragon (Enemy) to raze that same village (Impossible) would require 13 successes! Similarly, (and all other things being equal) it is as easy to convince a friend (Friendly) to murder or treason (Impossible) as it is to convince a sworn enemy (Enemy) to lend a helping hand (Trivial), each requiring 5 successes.

                            Resolving Attacks

                            Because attacks use opposed rolls, it is important that the attacker, the defender, and each of their allies have opportunities to use their reactions (which they gain from skills) to influence the outcome of the exchange. The attack progresses through four main steps (declare attack, roll dice, determine successes/hits, and determine damage), each of which is followed by opportunities for reactions for each of the participants (and also the bystanders):

                            • Declare attack
                            • Resolve reactions
                            • Roll dice
                            • Resolve reactions
                            • Determine successes/hits
                            • Resolve reactions
                            • Determine damage
                            • Resolve reactions

                            Declare Attack

                            The first step in resolving an attack is for the active player to declare an attack. In declaring an attack, the attacker does the following:

                            • Announce the attack (and any relevant skills)
                            • Specify the target(s)
                            • Spend or expend the energy required to initiate the attack (and then gain dice for the weapon or attack)
                            • Add energy dice to the action pool, if required
                            • Gain bonus dice into the action pool, if required

                              And then the defender has their opportunity to:

                              • Spend or expend the energy required to defend against the attack
                              • Add energy dice to the defense pool, if required
                              • Gain bonus dice into the defense pool, if required

                                Attacker Resolves Reactions

                                Example reaction trigger wording: When you declare a melee attack…? Immediately after the declaration of the attack, the attacker resolves any triggered reactions that they want to use or have to use. For example, the attacker may have a trained skill that allows them to change the damage type of an attack, or a spell-caster could adjust the range or effect area of their spell as a reaction. Any additional costs must be paid to activate this reaction.

                                Bystanders Resolve Reactions

                                Example reaction trigger wording: When an adjacent ally is the target of an attack that does not include you.? Following the attacker’s reaction resolution, everyone else except for the defender(s) get their turn to resolve their reactions. For example, a character trained in the Defender skill would react here to augment the defender’s defenses, even though that character is not one of the targets of the attack. As ever, the character must pay the costs of their reaction. In a more complicated example, a character with Reflex Strike could react to an attack with an attack of their own! In this situation, the Reflex Strike attack then resolves completely before the triggering attack resumes.

                                Defender Resolves Reactions

                                Example reaction trigger wording: When you are the target of a melee attack? Finally, the defender(s) has their opportunity to react to the attack to use skills. For example, a defender might react to use Dodge, Shield Training, or Brace to increase the number of dice in their relevant defense pool.

                                Roll Dice

                                Once everyone has had one opportunity to react to the attack, the dice pools should be ready for the attacker and the defender(s). With the dice pools ready, everyone rolls their pools simultaneously.

                                Resolve Reactions

                                Example reaction trigger wording: When you roll a melee attack…? With the dice rolled, the attacker, bystanders, and the defender(s) each have another opportunity to resolve reactions. These reactions are usually used to modify the outcome of the rolled pools, such as adding, removing, or re-rolling dice from the pools. For example, Twist the Blade allows an attacker to add additional dice to their action pool after the dice have been rolled. Conversely, Sidestep allows the defender to add additional dice to their defense pool.

                                Determine Successes/Hits

                                Now that the action pool and the defense pool(s) have been rolled (and resolved), the players can compare the pools to see how many successes/hits the attacker has made. As usual, the successes are the attacker’s dice that equal or better the defender’s single highest die.

                                Resolve Reactions

                                Example reaction trigger wording: When you hit a target with a melee attack.? As ever, the attacker, bystanders, and defender(s) each have their opportunity to react to stage of the combat resolution. For example, with Debilitating Blow, a character can use the trigger of a successful attack to spend additional energy and force the target to expend energy.

                                Determine Damage

                                The final step of combat resolution is to determine and apply damage to the target(s). In this stage the number of successes/hits is translated into damage, which is then modified for each of the targets. For example, targets may have vulnerabilities or resistances that increase or decrease the damage from certain types of attack. In another example, the Stunning Blow skill would have been used as a reaction at the declaration of the attack, but its effects are applied here to negate any damage and instead to apply a condition to the target.

                                Resolve Reactions

                                Example reaction trigger wording: When you take damage from an attack.? Finally, all the participants ” attacker, bystanders, and defender(s) ” get one last chance to resolve any reactions to the damage. As an example, a character with Retaliation skill gains bonus energy to the energy pool for each damage they take. Alternatively, the First Strike skill doubles the damage if the damage is the first that has been dealt in a combat encounter.

                                Dice Pool Probabilities

                                The table below shows the chances of achieving 1 success for combinations of dice pools and various fixed difficulty targets. Action Pool (below) Difficulty Target: 7 8 9 10 9 9 10 10 1d10 40% 30% 20% 10% – – 2d10 64% 51% 36% 19% 4% 1% 3d10 78% 66% 49% 27% 10% 3% 4d10 87% 76% 59% 34% 18% 5% 5d10 92% 83% 67% 41% 26% 8% 6d10 95% 88% 74% 47% 34% 11% 7d10 97% 92% 79% 52% 42% 15% 8d10 98% 94% 83% 57% 49% 19% 9d10 99% 96% 87% 61% 56% 23% 10d10 99% 97% 89% 65% 62% 26%

                                This table shows the chances of gaining at least 1 success for opposed dice pools. Action Pool (below) Defense Pool: 1d10 2d10 3d10 4d10 5d10 1d10 55% 39% 30% 25% 22% 2d10 72% 57% 48% 42% 37% 3d10 80% 67% 59% 53% 49% 4d10 85% 74% 67% 61% 57% 5d10 88% 79% 73% 68% 64% 6d10 90% 83% 77% 73% 69% 7d10 92% 86% 81% 77% 73% 8d10 93% 88% 83% 80% 77% 9d10 94% 90% 86% 83% 80% 10d10 95% 91% 88% 85% 82%

                                This table shows the mean number of successes for dice pools vs difficult targets. Dice Pool (below) Difficulty Target: 7 8 9 10 9 9 10 10 1d10 0 0 0 0 0 0 2d10 1 1 0 0 0 0 3d10 1 1 0 0 0 0 4d10 2 1 1 0 0 0 5d10 2 1 1 0 0 0 6d10 2 2 1 0 0 0 7d10 3 2 1 1 0 0 8d10 3 2 1 1 0 0 9d10 4 3 2 1 (1) 0 10d10 4 3 2 1 (1) 0

                                And this shows the mean number of successes for opposed dice pools. Action Pool (below) Defense Pool: 1d10 2d10 3d10 4d10 5d10 1d10 1 0 0 0 0 2d10 1 1 1 0 0 3d10 2 1 1 1 0 4d10 2 1 1 1 1 5d10 3 2 1 1 1 6d10 3 2 2 1 1 7d10 4 2 2 1 1 8d10 4 3 2 2 1 9d10 5 3 2 2 2 10d10 6 3 3 2 2 11d10 6 4 3 2 2 12d10 7 4 3 3 2 13d10 7 5 3 3 2 14d10 8 5 4 3 3 15d10 8 5 4 3 3

                                Critical Failures

                                Some groups play critical fail or botch rules. This can be implemented in Forge Engine games by using this optional rule:

                                Optional Rule: If an attack or attribute test has no successes and at least half of dice (rounded up) are 1s, then the test is a critical failure.

                                When using this rule, the chance of incurring a critical fail is highest when the attacker has just a few dice and the defender has more dice. To ensure the rule is fair, the critical failure only occurs when the attack achieves no successes, and the 1s do not negate successes. This table shows the chances of the attacker rolling a critical failure for various combinations of opposed dice pools. Action Pool (below) Defense Pool: 1d10 2d10 3d10 4d10 5d10 1d10 9% 10% 10% 10% 10% 2d10 8% 11% 13% 14% 14.6% 3d10 1.2% 1.6% 1.9% 2% 2.1% 4d10 1.4% 2.1% 2.6% 2.9% 3.2% 5d10 0.2% 0.35% 0.42% 0.48% 0.52% 6d10 0.3% 0.48% 0.61% 0.7% 0.77% 7d10 0.05% 0.08% 0.1% 0.12% 0.13% 8d10 0.07% 0.12% 0.15% 0.18% 0.2% 9d10 0.01% 0.02% 0.03% 0.03% 0.04% 10d10 0.02% 0.03% 0.04% 0.05% 0.05%

                                Externalities

                                Externalities are the situational and circumstantial factors that affect a character’s ability to perform an action. General guidelines for applying externalities:

                                • Modify the pool of the character that has the advantage or disadvantage
                                • Apply bonuses for advantageous situations, such as ‘gains ??’
                                • Apply penalty for unfavorable situations, such as ‘pool loses ?? (min. ? die)’
                                • Apply multiple bonuses and penalties

                                Melee Attacks

                                • Advantageous position (e.g. from height): Action pool gains ??
                                • Unfavorable position (e.g. obstructed): Action pool loses ?? (min. ? die)
                                • Unstable (e.g. mounted): Action pool loses ?? (min. ? die)

                                Ranged Attacks

                                • Into melee: Defender gains ? to their PD
                                • Beyond weapon range: Defender gains ?? to their PD for each range increment
                                • Inside weapon range (e.g. adjacent to attacker): Defender gains ?? to their PD
                                • Unstable (e.g. mounted): Action pool loses ?? (min. ? die)

                                Cover

                                • Partial Cover: Defender gains ? to their PD
                                • Half Cover: Defender gains ?? to their PD
                                • Three-Quarters Cover: Defender gains ??? to their PD
                                • Total Cover: Cannot be a target of a non-area attack or effect

                                Visibility

                                These externalities can apply to effects like magical invisibility or mundane situations like low light situations or fog.

                              • Obscure: Defender gains ? to their PD
                              • Faint: Defender gains ?? to their PD
                              • Invisible: Defender gains ??? to their PD

                              Handedness

                              • Using weapon or a tool in off-hand: Action pool loses ?? (min. ? die)

                              Custom Content

                              The Forge Engine is a framework for RPG play, and that framework is there for you to modify and expand as you like. The content provided here is thorough, but not all-encompassing. There are deliberate gaps and wide open design frontiers ripe for exploration and colonization. The content in Forge Engine falls into these broad categories:

                              • Traits
                              • General skills
                              • Martial skills
                              • Magic traits and skills
                              • Equipment

                              Adversaries

                              When creating custom content, it’s important to consider the design forms of each of the types of content, and a couple of general design rules:

                              • No prerequisites for skills (with an exception for magic traits and skills)
                              • Each purchased rating must have a meaningful impact
                              • Skills cannot be higher than the underlying attribute rating

                              No Prerequisites

                              The first rule for custom content is that there must not be prerequisites; skills and traits cannot depend on characters having other underlying skills. This rule exists to ensure a wide range of viable character builds, rather than a shrinking set of ‘optimal’ builds. The magic trait prerequisites are an exception to the rule to ensure that players do not simply cherry-pick a scattering of powerful magic skills for their characters. The magic trait buy-in ensures that players are actually committed to their characters’ builds.

                              Meaningful Skill Ratings

                              All skills have ratings, and each rating needs to have a meaningful benefit for the character. When designing new custom skills, it can be difficult to immediately come up with a benefit for each rating, but they must. Additionally, all skills and attributes must be functional at all possible ratings (from ? to ????? and higher). In most cases the skills give additional bonus dice, usually limited by the amount of energy spent. However, there a multiple examples where the skill cannot or does not neatly fit into this paradigm. Some examples include Armor Training, which removes penalties instead of giving bonuses, and Offensive Stance which uses the rating to determine how many times each round it gives a small bonus. Here are some ideas:

                              • Each rating adds an additional die to the pool (up to the added energy)
                              • Skill can be activated once per turn for each rating
                              • Target one character for each rating
                              • Ignore inherent penalties of equipment of equal or lower rating
                              • Each rating allows you to add, spend, or expend ? energy for an effect
                              • Benefits that accumulate with use (per turn or encounter), up to the rating

                              Expended Energy is Sacrosanct

                              Forge Engine has two dynamic resource pools; energy and health. Various skills allow resources to move between these pools, or even create additional resources in one or the other of these pools.

                              • Healers can expend energy to recover health
                              • Leaders can expend energy to create bonus energy

                              In order to prevent infinite resource loops, it is vital that no skills or traits ever allow a character to recover expended energy. If any skill allowed a character to recover expended energy, then one or more characters could combine several skills to create infinite energy or health.

                              Custom Traits

                              Traits have a fixed CP cost and can only be purchased once, usually at character creation. Some rare traits are liabilities, which have negative CP costs.

                              Custom General Skills

                              Custom general skills cost 1 CP for each rating, and their ratings must be able to go to ????? (and higher).

                              Custom Combat Skills

                              Custom martial skills cost 1 CP for each rating, and their ratings must be able to go to ????? (and higher).

                              Custom Magic Traits and Skills

                              Each school of magic has a casting trait and a set of corresponding magic skills. Custom casting traits cost 2 CP for each new school of magic. Each separate magic skill costs 1 CP for each rating, and their ratings must be able to go to ????? (and higher).

                              Custom Equipment

                              Equipment has an energy cost that represents the time and effort required to use the equipment and then its rating that reflects its ultimate effectiveness.

                              Custom Adversaries

                              The easiest way to make custom adversaries is to re-skin the templates, balancing their energy with the challenge you want for your players.

                              Custom Traits

                              Traits are bought for a fixed CP cost. They can only be purchased once, usually at character creation. The cost of each trait reflects the benefit that it grants the character.

                              Hindrances

                              Some rare traits are liabilities, and they have negative CP costs, which give the character additional CP to spend elsewhere. It is important that traits with negative costs apply meaningful liabilities to the character, not just superficial liabilities, and that their liability is disproportionately large compared to their CP benefit. Furthermore, it is also important that these traits are not just ‘spotlight’ traits, such as the character having a powerful enemy, that detract from the attention that other player characters receive at the table.

                              Types of Traits

                              The different categories of traits are:

                              • Species Traits
                              • Size Traits
                              • Attribute Traits
                              • Damage Traits
                              • Magic Traits
                              • Mental Traits
                              • Movement Traits
                              • Physical Traits
                              • Sensory Traits

                              Example Custom Species Traits

                              Species traits balance the choice of species, particularly in fantasy and sci-fi games, so that all choices are fair. Species traits combine beneficial and detrimental traits. All species choices include underlying traits that add up to approximately 3 CP. If we extrapolate to a space-opera game, we might attempt to create a custom lion alien: Pantherian Trait: 0 CP You are a pantherian (humanoid lion-like alien species). You have these traits:

                              • Medium
                              • Claws
                              • Acute Smell

                              Alternatively, if we wanted to make some kind of intergalactic killing machine: Xenomorph Trait: 21 CP You are a xenomorph (alien killing machine). You have these traits:

                              • Medium
                              • Insensitive
                              • Climber
                              • Claws
                              • Tail
                              • Obtuse
                              • Jumper
                              • Exoskeleton
                              • Dull
                              • Bite
                              • Sturdy

                              Example Custom Traits

                              Size Traits and Attribute Traits

                              The size traits and attribute traits sections cover most required sizes and attribute modifiers, so there is little need for custom content here.

                              Damage Traits

                              The damage traits section covers resistance and immunity to each damage type. For each new damage type, they need damage resistance and immunity traits. Alternatively, you could include damage vulnerability traits into your game. In this case, each of the damage types would gain a corresponding vulnerability trait: Acid Vulnerable Trait: -1 CP You are unusually vulnerable to acid. You take double damage from acid.

                              Magic Traits

                              Custom magic traits and skills are covered Custom Magic Traits and Skills on page 118.

                              Mental Traits

                              Custom mental traits are challenging to differentiate from sensory traits and magic. Dissociative Identity Trait: 2 CP You have multiple discrete personalities.

                              Movement Traits

                              The movement traits section offers scope for custom movement types, such as: Burrower Trait: 5 CP You can burrow through solid rock or soil. When you burrow, each 5’ of movement uses 10’ of your movement speed.

                              Physical Traits

                              The physical traits section offers the most room for expansion: Quatro-Mand Trait: 3 CP You have four arms, including two main hands and two off hands.

                              Sensory Traits

                              As with movement traits, the sensory traits offer some scope for new senses, such as: True Sight Trait: 5 CP You can see in circumstances that would otherwise impair your vision. Your vision is not impaired by darkness, obscurement, and illusions within 60’.

                              Custom General Skills

                              To reiterate, for general skills:

                              • Learnable or trainable skills
                              • Add bonus dice to attribute tests where that skill applies
                              • Ratings from ? to ????? (and higher)
                              • Each rating increase costs 1 CP
                              • Each rating increase gives a meaningful benefit

                              By their nature, there is some overlap in the scope of these general skills. For example, Intelligence (Investigation) and Intelligence (Knowledge: Cryptography) might both be used to decode a secret message.

                              Example Custom General Skills

                              The Genres and Worlds section on page 98 includes a number of example general skills for different genres. One such example for post-apocalyptic games is the Scavenge skill, which reflects the deterioration of our structured world. Scavenge Skill Gain bonus dice when making Acuity (Scavenge) tests to find useful or valuable items amongst debris and disorder.

                              Another example of general skills that could be useful in modern and hard-sci-fi games are ones that separate the Drive skill into Drive, Pilot, and Astro-Pilot. Drive Skill Gain bonus dice when making Agility (Drive) tests to ride, drive, or pilot a bike, car, cart, boat, or similar terrestrial vehicle.

                              Pilot Skill Gain bonus dice when making Agility (Pilot) tests to fly or pilot a helicopter, hang-glider, gyrocopter, airplane, or similar aerial vehicle.

                              Astro-Pilot Skill Gain bonus dice when making Agility (Astro-Pilot) tests to pilot a shuttle, spacecraft, starship, gunship, or similar zero-g vehicle.

                              Custom Martial Skills

                              Martial skills are divided into basic martial skills and specialized martial skills. Both of these kinds of skills cost 1 CP for each rating, and their ratings must be able to go to ????? and higher.

                              Basic Martial Skills

                              The basic martial skills cover the different classes of weapons and equipment that character might need:

                              Historical: Modern: Sci-Fi:

                              • Melee Weapons
                              • Hand Guns
                              • Power Armor Training
                              • Ranged Weapons
                              • Long Guns
                              • Finesse Weapons
                              • Heavy Guns
                              • Throw Weapons
                              • Brawling
                              • Martial Arts
                              • Reach Weapons
                              • Armor Training
                              • Shield Training

                              These skills represent all of the types of weapons and equipment that a character can use in combat, thus any possible weapon and equipment must be covered by one of these skills. The Forge Engine’s list of martial skills encompasses all types of weapons with very little overlap. Where there is overlap, such as Reach Weapons and Finesse Weapons which are both subsets of Melee Weapons, it is because these weapons require more specialized training than the more broad skill. When creating an additional basic martial skill, it must be sufficiently different from the basic skills to require additional training, and to warrant the player investing their character’s hard-earned character points. Obviously, there is a balance between splitting the skills into too many or too few separate skills. For example, Melee Weapons could be split into different types of bludgeoning, slashing, and piercing weapons. Alternatively, the separate firearms skills (Hand Guns, Long Guns, etc) could be combined into a generic Firearms Weapons skill. Once you’ve decided to create a new basic martial skill, it’s straightforward enough to actually create the skill. The skill must either piggyback onto a type of martial attack action (melee attack or ranged attack) or it must enable the use of a specific piece or category of equipment (armor or shields).

                              Example Custom Basic Martial Skills

                              If, for example, you decide to split the Melee Weapons skill up into separate bludgeoning, slashing, and stabbing skills, then that requires three separate skills and then splitting the melee weapons into each of the categories. Bludgeoning Weapons Basic Martial Strength Skill (Bonus) When you make a melee attack with a bludgeoning weapon, your action pool gains ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Bludgeoning Weapons rating.

                              Alternatively, if you decided to combine all of the separate firearms into a single Firearms Weapons skill, it would look like this: Firearms Weapons Basic Martial Agility Skill (Bonus) When you make a ranged attack with a firearm, your action pool gains ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Firearms Weapons rating.

                              Specialized Martial Skills

                              Specialized martial skills are distinct from, and build upon, basic martial skills. While the basic martial skills encompass large categories (melee weapons, reach weapons, ranged weapons, finesse weapons, etc), Specialized martial skills pinpoint tight, isolated, and unique situations. Thus, these skills either trigger or are most effective in unusual situations, there should be a cost paid, or a risk involved.

                              Situational:

                              • First attack of the encounter
                              • An ally attacked the enemy
                              • Attacked by an enemy

                              Risk:

                              • Adjacent to multiple enemies
                              • Forgo reactions or types of reactions

                              Cost:

                              • Expend energy
                              • Just took damage
                              • Forgo actions or types of actions

                              As an example, this Whirlwind Attack specialized martial skill is available when the character has two or more adjacent targets, which is a risk. The skill becomes more effective as the risk increases. Whirlwind Attack Specialized Martial Skill (Action) You can make a melee attack at two or more targets that are adjacent to you and adjacent to each other. For each rating you have in Whirlwind Attack you can add one extra target to your melee attack. You must pay the normal energy costs of the melee attack, and you gain the benefits of the associated basic martial skill (Melee Weapons). You then split the action pool as evenly as possible between the targets, and each pool gains bonus dice equal to your Whirlwind Attack rating, but no higher than the energy you added to the attack action. Each pool then resolves against its target separately.

                              Custom Magic Traits And Skills

                              Magic mechanics in Forge Engine games have two components, traits and skills. The traits represent the ‘buy-in’ cost for each school of magic. The skills are the individual spells that belong to one of the schools, or are cantrips that are available to all schools.

                              Schools of Magic

                              There are lots of possible types of magic, only a few covered in the core of the Forge Engine, giving many opportunities for custom expansion:

                              • Elemental
                              • Summoning
                              • Arcanery
                              • Pyromancy
                              • Divinity
                              • Elementalism
                              • Geomancy
                              • Spellsinger
                              • Thaumaturgy
                              • Alchemy
                              • Wizardry
                              • Warmage
                              • Enchanter
                              • Runemastery
                              • Evangelism
                              • Vitality
                              • Animus
                              • Chronomancy
                              • Telekinesis
                              • Ritualism
                              • Artificery
                              • Mysticism
                              • Shapeshifting
                              • Shamanism
                              • Conjury
                              • Necromancy
                              • Sorcery

                              Custom Magic Traits

                              Each new magic school requires a trait that allows a character to train the spells of that school. For example, to create a new Enchanter school: Enchantment Caster Trait: 2 CP You are an enchanter who can train Enchantment Magic and Cantrip Magic skills.

                              Custom Magic Spell Skills

                              Custom magic skills are necessary when creating a new magic school, and when expanding the selection of spells available to an existing magic school. Magic skills follow a fairly straightforward format: Spell Name Magic School Attribute Action/Reaction Short summary of the spell. Expend ?, then add energy to your action pool up to your attribute rating and gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Spell Name rating. Further instructions about the spell’s targets and affects of the spell.

                              Costing Spells

                              For simplicity, spells do not include spend costs, only expend costs. This means that the variable cost of Forge Engine spells is the expend cost. Each of the components of a spell ” its range, effects, duration, etc ” contributes to the cost of the spell. To calculate the cost of a custom spell, its individual components are determined and then summed. If the expend cost has a ½ die, then this is rounded down. Cost – ½ -No cost ? ?? Range – 5’ (touch) 25’ 100’ Area of Effect – — 15’ radius 25’ radius Damage ½ damage – Damage/success Damage/die Healing – – Single target Multiple targets Targets – All Allies or enemies only Selected targets only (or divided amongst targets)

                              Taking the example of a basic healing spell: Healing Touch Animist Magic Acuity Action You heal yourself or an ally. Expend ?, then add energy to your action pool up to your Acuity rating and gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Healing Touch rating. Assign all of the dice to yourself or an adjacent ally. The target recovers 1 heath for each allocated die.

                              For this Healing Touch spell, we have the following components:

                              • Range: Touch (no cost)
                              • Healing: Single target (? energy)
                              • Targets: All (no cost)

                                This gives us a total expend cost of ? energy.

                                Custom Equipment

                                Equipment in Forge Engine games has a number of characteristics, depending on its function. Equipment may:

                                • Aid ability tests, such as binoculars
                                • Grant characters new actions, such as shields
                                • Allow combat actions and the associated skills

                                Custom Weapons

                                Weapons have the following characteristics:

                                • Hands required to hold and use
                                • Effective range
                                • Energy cost to use
                                • Attack dice gained
                                • Energy cost to reload
                                • Type of damage

                                  The stats for the equipment listed in the Equipment section on page 85 are designed to reflect the effort to use each type of weapon (its cost), and then to reflect its effectiveness (its rating). For example, a wooden beam and a metal sword require approximately the same effort to wield (and thus have the same energy cost), but the metal sword is more effective at injuring its target (and thus gains more bonus dice).

                                  Costing and Rating Custom Weapons

                                  When working out costs and ratings for weapons, these rough rules of thumb may help: Martial Weapons Weight Cost Characteristics Rating Slight (up to 1kg) ? Blunt (e.g. fists, club, pole) Cost – ? Light (~1kg) ?? Sharp (e.g. sword, mace) Cost Moderate (~2kg) ??? Light or Slight – ? Heavy (~3kg) ???? Heavy or V. Heavy + ? V. Heavy (~4+kg) 1/2H weapon used two handed + ? Thrown/Drawn + ? Ranged – ? Triggered – ? Reach – ?? Two-handed only weapon + ?? Held energy (e.g. crossbow) Variable

                                  Avoiding Power Creep

                                  It can be tempting to try to reflect slightly better weapons and equipment with increases in their rating, and therefore a meaningful increase in their power. This incremental power creep needs to be avoided, even if some variance between weapons is lost.

                                  Historical, Modern, and Sci-Fi Balance

                                  Generally speaking, the relative ‘power’ of the equivalent equipment in Forge Engine does not escalate dramatically between historical, modern, and sci-fi play. For example, the various types of armor available in each era of play are functionally the same. Similarly, melee weapons in historical play are the same as those available in modern play. This general power curve has a couple of notable ‘steps’. The first of these is firearms, which introduce significant stored energy into the equipment, and thus have significantly higher ratings than historical weapons that relied on the power imparted by their wielder. A notable comparison here is between firearms and crossbows/bows, where the weapons can be roughly the same rating, but historical crossbows and bows are less effective due to their reload times. The weapon’s spend cost and its reload time is the time that it takes the weapon’s wielder to impart the stored energy into the weapon. Looking to the future, we have sci-fi settings that introduce melee weapons that are ‘powered’ like lightsabers or otherwise extraordinarily effective, like cyberpunk’s monofilament whips. These sorts of weapons may be comparable to the firearms or energy weapons of those settings, offering players a real choice between melee and ranged weapons.

                                  Magic Weapons

                                  In any fantasy game there is an easy expectation of ‘magic’ weapons with increasing effectiveness, +1 sword, +2 sword, etc. This sort of magical effectiveness is easy enough to implement in Forge Engine by simply increasing the rating of the weapon while maintaining its cost. When trying to reflect these epic weapons while also restraining power creep, instead of offering simple rating increases, the weapon can instead offer a special triggered ability. For example: Giant Slayer Equipment (Greatsword) When this weapon is used to make a melee attack at a character whose size is Large or bigger, the action pool gains ??.

                                  Approximating Verisimilitude

                                  In order to streamline play, Forge Engine does not try to simulate every aspect of each action or piece of equipment, rather it approximates these. For example, a .22 pistol, a .38 revolver and a .32 pistol all have the same energy cost to fire (?), and all gain the same number of attack dice (?), but their varying effectiveness is represented in their effective range. If the target of these weapons is standing 10’ from the wielder, then they are equally effective, but as the distance increases the .22 rapidly loses effectiveness.

                                  Custom Adversaries

                                  Custom adversaries ” be they normal humans, aliens, animals, or literal monsters ” can be created in several ways:

                                  • Standard character build
                                  • Modified adversary template
                                  • Reskinned adversary template

                                  Standard Character Build

                                  Many types of adversaries can be built by combining the standard character building rules with non-standard traits. This option is best used with adversaries that require careful design and crafting. For example, an adversary could be put together using the following traits:

                                  • Colossal
                                  • Bite
                                  • Burrower
                                  • Tremorsense
                                  • Carapace

                                  You might recognize this sort of creature.

                                  Modified Adversary Template

                                  Alternatively, when you’re running a game and quickly need an adversary to drop into play, there’s a simple method to achieve this:

                                  • Choose a adversary template (based on your desired energy level)
                                  • Apply one or more traits, specialized martial skills, or magic skills

                                  For example, let’s say I want a super-sexy vampire: Commander Human Strength: ? Agility: ? Stamina: ? Influence: ? Intelligence: ? Acuity: ? Energy: «? Health: 8 PD: ??? MD: ?? Melee Weapons: ??? Perception (ACU): ? Armor Training: ?? Language (Native): ?? ? Melee weapon ?/? piercing, Melee Weapons; max attack ?/? Distracting Taunt: ???? Action Add energy to your action pool up to your INF rating, gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Distracting Taunt rating. Attack the MD of a target up to 50’ away. If you achieve 1 or 2 successes, the target is Enervated (they only regain energy equal to their two highest attributes). If you achieve 3 or more successes, the target is Exhausted (they only regain energy equal to their single highest attribute). The target must use Shake It Off to remove the effect. Human: Medium (Size 5-6’, Move 30’, Health 3 + twice Stamina, Reach 5’), Sensitive Melee weapon (?/?) Armor (??)

                                  And let’s add a sexy bite: Bite Trait: 3 CP You have sharp teeth. You do not need arms to make an unarmed melee attack. You can make an unarmed melee attack with your bite for ??/?.

                                  Reskinned Adversary Template

                                  The final method is a GM-only super-secret:

                                  • Choose an adversary template (based on your desired energy level)
                                  • Describe to the players what sort of adversary their characters see
                                  • Run it (that’s it, we’re done…)

                                  Adversary Templates

                                  Fantasy Adversaries – 6 Energy Grunt Human Strength: ? Agility: ? Stamina: ? Influence: ? Intelligence: ? Acuity: ? Energy: ? Health: 7 PD: ??? MD: ?? Melee Weapons (STR): ?? Perception (ACU): ?? Armor Training (STR): ?? Language (Native) (INT): ?? ? Melee weapon ?/? piercing, Melee Weapons; max attack ?/? ? Ranged weapon ?/? piercing, 10-50’, Ranged Weapons, max attack ?/? Offensive Stance: ?? Specialized Martial Skill (Action) Activate Offensive Stance as a minor action. While the stance is active, when you make a martial attack you gain ? bonus die to your action pool for each added energy, up to your Offensive Stance rating. While in this stance, you cannot gain the benefits of other specialized martial skills. Human: Medium (Size 5-6’, Move 30’, Health 3 + twice Stamina, Reach 5’), Muscular Melee weapon (?/?) Ranged weapon (?/?) Armor (??)

                                  Striker Human Strength: ? Agility: ? Stamina: ? Influence: ? Intelligence: ? Acuity: ? Energy: ? Health: 5 PD: ?? MD: ?? Ranged Weapons (AGI): ??? Initiative (AGI): ??? Armor Training (STR): ? Language (Native) (INT): ?? ? Ranged weapon ?/? piercing, 10-50’, Ranged Weapons, max attack ?/? Engaged Attack: ??? Specialized Martial Skill (Passive Bonus) When you make a martial attack at a target within the reach of an ally, you gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Engaged Attack rating. Human: Medium (Size 5-6’, Move 30’, Health 3 + twice Stamina, Reach 5’), Lithe Ranged weapon (?/?) Armor (?)

                                  Caster Human Strength: ? Agility: ? Stamina: ? Influence: ? Intelligence: ? Acuity: ? Energy: ? Health: 5 PD: ? MD: ?? Perception (ACU): ?? Language (Native) (INT): ?? Fiery Bolt: ??? Pyromancy Magic Intelligence Action Add energy to your action pool up to your INT rating, gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Fiery Bolt rating. Attack the PD of a target up to 25’ away. The target takes fire damage equal to the half the number of hits (rounded up). Flaming Touch: ? Pyromancy Magic Intelligence Action Add energy to your action pool up to your INT rating, gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Flaming Touch rating. Attack the PD of a target within your reach. The target takes fire damage equal to the number of hits. Human: Medium (Size 5-6’, Move 30’, Health 3 + twice Stamina, Reach 5’), Astute Pyromancer Casting: You can train Pyromancy Magic skills Commander Human Strength: ? Agility: ? Stamina: ? Influence: ? Intelligence: ? Acuity: ? Energy: ? Health: 7 PD: ?? MD: ?? Melee Weapons (STR): ? Perception (ACU): ? Armor Training (STR): ? Language (Native) (INT): ?? ? Melee weapon ?/? piercing, Melee Weapons; max attack ?/? Distracting Taunt: ??? Specialized Martial Skill (Action) Add energy to your action pool up to your INF rating, gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Distracting Taunt rating. Attack the MD of a target up to 50’ away. If you achieve 1 or 2 successes, the target is Enervated (they only regain energy equal to their two highest attributes). If you achieve 3 or more successes, the target is Exhausted (they only regain energy equal to their single highest attribute). The target must use Shake It Off to remove the effect. Human: Medium (Size 5-6’, Move 30’, Health 3 + twice Stamina, Reach 5’), Sensitive Melee weapon (?/?) Armor (?) Fantasy Adversaries – 8 Energy Grunt Human Strength: ? Agility: ? Stamina: ? Influence: ? Intelligence: ? Acuity: ? Energy: ? Health: 9 PD: ??? MD: ?? Melee Weapons (STR): ??? Perception (ACU): ?? Armor Training (STR): ?? Language (Native) (INT): ?? ? Melee weapon ?/? piercing, Melee Weapons; max attack ?/? ? Ranged weapon ?/? piercing, 10-50’, Ranged Weapons, max attack ?/? Engaged Attack: ??? Specialized Martial Skill (Action) When you make a martial attack at a target within the reach of an ally, you gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Engaged Attack rating. Opportunity Attack: ??? Specialized Martial Skill (Reaction) When a character uses an action that moves them out of your reach, you can immediately make a melee attack at that target. The attack’s energy cost is reduced by your Opportunity Attack rating. Human: Medium (Size 5-6’, Move 30’, Health 3 + twice Stamina, Reach 5’), Muscular Melee weapon (?/?) Ranged weapon (?/?) Armor (??)

                                  Striker Human Strength: ? Agility: ? Stamina: ? Influence: ? Intelligence: ? Acuity: ? Energy: ? Health: 7 PD: ?? MD: ?? Ranged Weapons (AGI): ???? Initiative (AGI): ???? Armor Training (STR): ? Language (Native) (INT): ?? ? Ranged weapon ?/? piercing, 10-200’, Ranged Weapons, max attack ?/«? Engaged Attack: ???? Specialized Martial Skill (Passive Bonus) When you make a martial attack at a target within the reach of an ally, you gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Engaged Attack rating. Human: Medium (Size 5-6’, Move 30’, Health 3 + twice Stamina, Reach 5’), Lithe Ranged weapon (?/?) Armor (?)

                                  Caster Human Strength: ? Agility: ? Stamina: ? Influence: ? Intelligence: ? Acuity: ? Energy: ? Health: 5 PD: ? MD: ?? Armor Training (STR): ? Language (Native) (INT): ?? Fiery Bolt: ???? Pyromancy Magic Intelligence Action Add energy to your action pool up to your INT rating, gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Fiery Bolt rating. Attack the PD of a target up to 25’ away. The target takes fire damage equal to the half the number of hits (rounded up). Flaming Touch: ?? Pyromancy Magic Intelligence Action Add energy to your action pool up to your INT rating, gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Flaming Touch rating. Attack the PD of a target within your reach. The target takes fire damage equal to the number of hits. Human: Medium (Size 5-6’, Move 30’, Health 3 + twice Stamina, Reach 5’), Astute Pyromancer Casting: You can train Pyromancy Magic skills Commander Human Strength: ? Agility: ? Stamina: ? Influence: ? Intelligence: ? Acuity: ? Energy: ? Health: 7 PD: ?? MD: ?? Melee Weapons (STR): ?? Perception (ACU): ? Armor Training (STR): ? Language (Native) (INT): ?? ? Melee weapon ?/? piercing, Melee Weapons; max attack ?/? Distracting Taunt: ???? Specialized Martial Skill (Action) Add energy to your action pool up to your INF rating, gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Distracting Taunt rating. Attack the MD of a target up to 50’ away. If you achieve 1 or 2 successes, the target is Enervated (they only regain energy equal to their two highest attributes). If you achieve 3 or more successes, the target is Exhausted (they only regain energy equal to their single highest attribute). The target must use Shake It Off to remove the effect. Human: Medium (Size 5-6’, Move 30’, Health 3 + twice Stamina, Reach 5’), Sensitive Melee weapon (?/?) Armor (?) Fantasy Adversaries – 10 Energy Grunt Human Strength: ? Agility: ? Stamina: ? Influence: ? Intelligence: ? Acuity: ? Energy: «? Health: 11 PD: ???? MD: ?? Melee Weapons (STR): ???? Perception (ACU): ?? Armor Training (STR): ??? Language (Native) (INT): ?? ? Melee weapon ?/? piercing, Melee Weapons; max attack ?/«? ? Ranged weapon ?/? piercing, 10-50’, Ranged Weapons, max attack ?/? Engaged Attack: ???? Specialized Martial Skill (Action) When you make a martial attack at a target within the reach of an ally, you gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Engaged Attack rating. Opportunity Attack: ???? Specialized Martial Skill (Reaction) When a character uses an action that moves them out of your reach, you can immediately make a melee attack at that target. The attack’s energy cost is reduced by your Opportunity Attack rating. Human: Medium (Size 5-6’, Move 30’, Health 3 + twice Stamina, Reach 5’), Muscular Melee weapon (?/?) Ranged weapon (?/?) Armor (???)

                                  Striker Human Strength: ? Agility: ? Stamina: ? Influence: ? Intelligence: ? Acuity: ? Energy: «? Health: 9 PD: ??? MD: ?? Ranged Weapons (AGI): ???? Initiative (AGI): ???? Armor Training (STR): ?? Language (Native) (INT): ?? ? Ranged weapon ?/? piercing, 10-200’, Ranged Weapons, max attack ?/«? Engaged Attack: ???? Specialized Martial Skill (Passive Bonus) When you make a martial attack at a target within the reach of an ally, you gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Engaged Attack rating. Human: Medium (Size 5-6’, Move 30’, Health 3 + twice Stamina, Reach 5’), Lithe Ranged weapon (?/?) Armor (??)

                                  Caster Human Strength: ? Agility: ? Stamina: ? Influence: ? Intelligence: ? Acuity: ? Energy: «? Health: 7 PD: ?? MD: ??? Armor Training (STR): ? Language (Native) (INT): ?? Fiery Bolt: ???? Pyromancy Magic Intelligence Action Add energy to your action pool up to your INT rating, gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Fiery Bolt rating. Attack the PD of a target up to 25’ away. The target takes fire damage equal to the half the number of hits (rounded up). Flaming Touch: ???? Pyromancy Magic Intelligence Action Add energy to your action pool up to your INT rating, gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Flaming Touch rating. Attack the PD of a target within your reach. The target takes fire damage equal to the number of hits. Human: Medium (Size 5-6’, Move 30’, Health 3 + twice Stamina, Reach 5’), Astute Pyromancer Casting: You can train Pyromancy Magic skills Armor (?)

                                  Commander Human Strength: ? Agility: ? Stamina: ? Influence: ? Intelligence: ? Acuity: ? Energy: «? Health: 9 PD: ??? MD: ?? Melee Weapons (STR): ??? Perception (ACU): ? Armor Training (STR): ?? Language (Native) (INT): ?? ? Melee weapon ?/? piercing, Melee Weapons; max attack ?/? Distracting Taunt: ???? Specialized Martial Skill (Action) Add energy to your action pool up to your INF rating, gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Distracting Taunt rating. Attack the MD of a target up to 50’ away. If you achieve 1 or 2 successes, the target is Enervated (they only regain energy equal to their two highest attributes). If you achieve 3 or more successes, the target is Exhausted (they only regain energy equal to their single highest attribute). The target must use Shake It Off to remove the effect. Human: Medium (Size 5-6’, Move 30’, Health 3 + twice Stamina, Reach 5’), Sensitive Melee weapon (?/?) Armor (??) Fantasy Adversaries – 12 Energy Grunt Human Strength: ? Agility: ? Stamina: ? Influence: ? Intelligence: ? Acuity: ? Energy: «? Health: 11 PD: ???? MD: ?? Melee Weapons (STR): ????? Perception (ACU): ??? Armor Training (STR): ??? Language (Native) (INT): ?? ? Melee weapon ?/? piercing, Melee Weapons; max attack ?/«? ? Ranged weapon ?/? piercing, 10-50’, Ranged Weapons, max attack ?/? Engaged Attack: ????? Specialized Martial Skill (Action) When you make a martial attack at a target within the reach of an ally, you gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Engaged Attack rating. Opportunity Attack: ????? Specialized Martial Skill (Reaction) When a character uses an action that moves them out of your reach, you can immediately make a melee attack at that target. The attack’s energy cost is reduced by your Opportunity Attack rating. Human: Medium (Size 5-6’, Move 30’, Health 3 + twice Stamina, Reach 5’), Muscular Melee weapon (?/?) Ranged weapon (?/?) Armor (???)

                                  Striker Human Strength: ? Agility: ? Stamina: ? Influence: ? Intelligence: ? Acuity: ? Energy: «? Health: 9 PD: ??? MD: ?? Ranged Weapons (AGI): ????? Initiative (AGI): ???? Armor Training (STR): ?? Language (Native) (INT): ?? ? Ranged weapon ?/? piercing, 10-200’, Ranged Weapons, max attack ?/«? Engaged Attack: ????? Specialized Martial Skill (Passive Bonus) When you make a martial attack at a target within the reach of an ally, you gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Engaged Attack rating. Human: Medium (Size 5-6’, Move 30’, Health 3 + twice Stamina, Reach 5’), Lithe Ranged weapon (?/?) Armor (??)

                                  Caster Human Strength: ? Agility: ? Stamina: ? Influence: ? Intelligence: ? Acuity: ? Energy: «? Health: 9 PD: ?? MD: ??? Armor Training (STR): ? Language (Native) (INT): ?? Fiery Bolt: ????? Pyromancy Magic Intelligence Action Add energy to your action pool up to your INT rating, gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Fiery Bolt rating. Attack the PD of a target up to 25’ away. The target takes fire damage equal to the half the number of hits (rounded up). Flaming Touch: ????? Pyromancy Magic Intelligence Action Add energy to your action pool up to your INT rating, gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Flaming Touch rating. Attack the PD of a target within your reach. The target takes fire damage equal to the number of hits. Human: Medium (Size 5-6’, Move 30’, Health 3 + twice Stamina, Reach 5’), Astute Pyromancer Casting: You can train Pyromancy Magic skills Armor (?)

                                  Commander Human Strength: ? Agility: ? Stamina: ? Influence: ? Intelligence: ? Acuity: ? Energy: «? Health: 9 PD: ??? MD: ?? Melee Weapons (STR): ???? Perception (ACU): ? Armor Training (STR): ?? Language (Native) (INT): ?? ? Melee weapon ?/? piercing, Melee Weapons; max attack ?/«? Distracting Taunt: ????? Specialized Martial Skill (Action) Add energy to your action pool up to your INF rating, gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Distracting Taunt rating. Attack the MD of a target up to 50’ away. If you achieve 1 or 2 successes, the target is Enervated (they only regain energy equal to their two highest attributes). If you achieve 3 or more successes, the target is Exhausted (they only regain energy equal to their single highest attribute). The target must use Shake It Off to remove the effect. Human: Medium (Size 5-6’, Move 30’, Health 3 + twice Stamina, Reach 5’), Sensitive Melee weapon (?/?) Armor (??) Fantasy Adversaries – 15 Energy Grunt Human Strength: ? Agility: ? Stamina: ? Influence: ? Intelligence: ? Acuity: ? Energy: «? Health: 13 PD: ???? MD: ??? Melee Weapons (STR): ????? ? Perception (ACU): ?? Armor Training (STR): ??? Language (Native) (INT): ?? ? Melee weapon ?/? piercing, Melee Weapons; max attack: ?/«? ? Ranged weapon ?/? piercing, 10-50’, Ranged Weapons, max attack ?/? Engaged Attack: ????? ? Specialized Martial Skill (Action) When you make a martial attack at a target within the reach of an ally, you gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Engaged Attack rating. Opportunity Attack: ????? ? Specialized Martial Skill (Reaction) When a character uses an action that moves them out of your reach, you can immediately make a melee attack at that target. The attack’s energy cost is reduced by your Opportunity Attack rating. Human: Medium (Size 5-6’, Move 30’, Health 3 + twice Stamina, Reach 5’), Muscular Melee weapon (?/?) Ranged weapon (?/?) Armor (???)

                                  Striker Human Strength: ? Agility: ? Stamina: ? Influence: ? Intelligence: ? Acuity: ? Energy: «? Health: 11 PD: ??? MD: ??? Ranged Weapons (AGI): ????? ? Initiative (AGI): ????? ? Armor Training (STR): ?? Language (Native) (INT): ?? ? Ranged weapon ?/? piercing, 10-200’, Ranged Weapons, max attack ?/«? Engaged Attack: ????? ? Specialized Martial Skill (Passive Bonus) When you make a martial attack at a target within the reach of an ally, you gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Engaged Attack rating. Human: Medium (Size 5-6’, Move 30’, Health 3 + twice Stamina, Reach 5’), Lithe Ranged weapon (?/?) Armor (??)

                                  Caster Human Strength: ? Agility: ? Stamina: ? Influence: ? Intelligence: ? Acuity: ? Energy: «? Health: 9 PD: ?? MD: ????? Armor Training (STR): ? Language (Native) (INT): ?? Fiery Bolt: ????? ? Pyromancy Magic Intelligence Action Add energy to your action pool up to your INT rating, gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Fiery Bolt rating. Attack the PD of a target up to 25’ away. The target takes fire damage equal to the half the number of hits (rounded up). Flaming Touch: ????? ? Pyromancy Magic Intelligence Action Add energy to your action pool up to your INT rating, gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Flaming Touch rating. Attack the PD of a target within your reach. The target takes fire damage equal to the number of hits. Human: Medium (Size 5-6’, Move 30’, Health 3 + twice Stamina, Reach 5’), Astute Pyromancer Casting: You can train Pyromancy Magic skills Armor (?)

                                  Commander Human Strength: ? Agility: ? Stamina: ? Influence: ? Intelligence: ? Acuity: ? Energy: «? Health: 11 PD: ??? MD: ???? Melee Weapons (STR): ????? Perception (ACU): ??? Armor Training (STR): ?? Language (Native) (INT): ??? ? Melee weapon ?/? piercing, Melee Weapons; max attack ?/«? Distracting Taunt: ????? ? Specialized Martial Skill (Action) Add energy to your action pool up to your INF rating, gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Distracting Taunt rating. Attack the MD of a target up to 50’ away. If you achieve 1 or 2 successes, the target is Enervated (they only regain energy equal to their two highest attributes). If you achieve 3 or more successes, the target is Exhausted (they only regain energy equal to their single highest attribute). The target must use Shake It Off to remove the effect. Human: Medium (Size 5-6’, Move 30’, Health 3 + twice Stamina, Reach 5’), Sensitive Melee weapon (?/?) Armor (??) Modern/Sci-Fi Adversaries – 6 Energy Grunt Human Strength: ? Agility: ? Stamina: ? Influence: ? Intelligence: ? Acuity: ? Energy: ? Health: 7 PD: ??? MD: ?? Melee Weapons (STR): ?? Perception (ACU): ?? Armor Training (STR): ?? Language (Native) (INT): ?? ? Melee weapon ?/? piercing, Melee Weapons; max attack ?/? ? Ranged weapon ?/? piercing, 10-20’, Ranged Weapons, max attack ?/? Offensive Stance: ?? Specialized Martial Skill (Action) Activate Offensive Stance as a minor action. While the stance is active, when you make a martial attack you gain ? bonus die to your action pool for each added energy, up to your Offensive Stance rating. While in this stance, you cannot gain the benefits of other specialized martial skills. Human: Medium (Size 5-6’, Move 30’, Health 3 + twice Stamina, Reach 5’), Muscular Ranged weapon (?/?) 2H, SA Melee weapon (?/?) Armor (??)

                                  Striker Human Strength: ? Agility: ? Stamina: ? Influence: ? Intelligence: ? Acuity: ? Energy: ? Health: 5 PD: ?? MD: ?? Ranged Weapons (AGI): ??? Initiative (AGI): ??? Armor Training (STR): ? Language (Native) (INT): ?? ? Ranged weapon ?/? piercing, 10-100’, Ranged Weapons, max attack ?/? Engaged Attack: ??? Specialized Martial Skill (Passive Bonus) When you make a martial attack at a target within the reach of an ally, you gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Engaged Attack rating. Human: Medium (Size 5-6’, Move 30’, Health 3 + twice Stamina, Reach 5’), Lithe Ranged weapon (?/?) 2H, SA, BF, FA Armor (?)

                                  Caster Human Strength: ? Agility: ? Stamina: ? Influence: ? Intelligence: ? Acuity: ? Energy: ? Health: 5 PD: ? MD: ?? Perception (ACU): ?? Language (Native) (INT): ?? Fiery Bolt: ??? Pyromancy Magic Intelligence Action Add energy to your action pool up to your INT rating, gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Fiery Bolt rating. Attack the PD of a target up to 25’ away. The target takes fire damage equal to the half the number of hits (rounded up). Flaming Touch: ? Pyromancy Magic Intelligence Action Add energy to your action pool up to your INT rating, gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Flaming Touch rating. Attack the PD of a target within your reach. The target takes fire damage equal to the number of hits. Human: Medium (Size 5-6’, Move 30’, Health 3 + twice Stamina, Reach 5’), Astute Pyromancer Casting: You can train Pyromancy Magic skills Commander Human Strength: ? Agility: ? Stamina: ? Influence: ? Intelligence: ? Acuity: ? Energy: ? Health: 7 PD: ?? MD: ?? Melee Weapons (STR): ? Perception (ACU): ? Ranged Weapons (AGI): ? Knowledge (Military) (INT): ?? Armor Training (STR): ? Language (Native) (INT): ?? ? Melee weapon ?/? piercing, Melee Weapons; max attack ?/? ? Ranged weapon ?/? piercing, 10-20’, Ranged Weapons, max attack ?/? Leader’s Pledge: ??? Specialized Martial Skill (Action) When an ally within 25’ can perceive you, you can spend energy equal to your Influence, up to your Leader’s Pledge rating. That ally gains ? bonus energy for each energy spent. This bonus energy lasts until the end of the target’s next turn. Human: Medium (Size 5-6’, Move 30’, Health 3 + twice Stamina, Reach 5’), Sensitive Ranged weapon (?/?) 2H, SA Melee weapon (?/?) Armor (?) Modern/Sci-Fi Adversaries – 8 Energy Grunt Human Strength: ? Agility: ? Stamina: ? Influence: ? Intelligence: ? Acuity: ? Energy: ? Health: 9 PD: ??? MD: ?? Melee Weapons (STR): ??? Perception (ACU): ?? Armor Training (STR): ?? Language (Native) (INT): ?? ? Melee weapon ?/? piercing, Melee Weapons; max attack ?/? ? Ranged weapon ?/? piercing, 10-20’, Ranged Weapons, max attack ?/? Engaged Attack: ??? Specialized Martial Skill (Action) When you make a martial attack at a target within the reach of an ally, you gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Engaged Attack rating. Opportunity Attack: ??? Specialized Martial Skill (Reaction) When a character uses an action that moves them out of your reach, you can immediately make a melee attack at that target. The attack’s energy cost is reduced by your Opportunity Attack rating. Human: Medium (Size 5-6’, Move 30’, Health 3 + twice Stamina, Reach 5’), Muscular Ranged weapon (?/?) 2H, SA Melee weapon (?/?) Armor (??)

                                  Striker Human Strength: ? Agility: ? Stamina: ? Influence: ? Intelligence: ? Acuity: ? Energy: ? Health: 7 PD: ?? MD: ?? Ranged Weapons (AGI): ???? Initiative (AGI): ???? Armor Training (STR): ? Language (Native) (INT): ?? ? Ranged weapon ?/? piercing, 10-100’, Ranged Weapons, max attack ?/«? Engaged Attack: ???? Specialized Martial Skill (Passive Bonus) When you make a martial attack at a target within the reach of an ally, you gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Engaged Attack rating. Human: Medium (Size 5-6’, Move 30’, Health 3 + twice Stamina, Reach 5’), Lithe Ranged weapon (?/?) 2H, SA, BF, FA Armor (?)

                                  Caster Human Strength: ? Agility: ? Stamina: ? Influence: ? Intelligence: ? Acuity: ? Energy: ? Health: 5 PD: ? MD: ?? Armor Training (STR): ? Language (Native) (INT): ?? Fiery Bolt: ???? Pyromancy Magic Intelligence Action Add energy to your action pool up to your INT rating, gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Fiery Bolt rating. Attack the PD of a target up to 25’ away. The target takes fire damage equal to the half the number of hits (rounded up). Flaming Touch: ?? Pyromancy Magic Intelligence Action Add energy to your action pool up to your INT rating, gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Flaming Touch rating. Attack the PD of a target within your reach. The target takes fire damage equal to the number of hits. Human: Medium (Size 5-6’, Move 30’, Health 3 + twice Stamina, Reach 5’), Astute Pyromancer Casting: You can train Pyromancy Magic skills Commander Human Strength: ? Agility: ? Stamina: ? Influence: ? Intelligence: ? Acuity: ? Energy: ? Health: 7 PD: ?? MD: ?? Melee Weapons (STR): ?? Perception (ACU): ? Ranged Weapons (AGI): ?? Knowledge (Military) (INT): ?? Armor Training (STR): ? Language (Native) (INT): ?? ? Melee weapon ?/? piercing, Melee Weapons; max attack ?/? ? Ranged weapon ?/? piercing, 10-20’, Ranged Weapons, max attack ?/? Leader’s Pledge: ???? Specialized Martial Skill (Action) When an ally within 25’ can perceive you, you can spend energy equal to your Influence, up to your Leader’s Pledge rating. That ally gains ? bonus energy for each energy spent. This bonus energy lasts until the end of the target’s next turn. Human: Medium (Size 5-6’, Move 30’, Health 3 + twice Stamina, Reach 5’), Sensitive Ranged weapon (?/?) 2H, SA Melee weapon (?/?) Armor (?) Modern/Sci-Fi Adversaries – 10 Energy Grunt Human Strength: ? Agility: ? Stamina: ? Influence: ? Intelligence: ? Acuity: ? Energy: «? Health: 11 PD: ???? MD: ?? Melee Weapons (STR): ???? Perception (ACU): ?? Armor Training (STR): ??? Language (Native) (INT): ?? ? Melee weapon ?/? piercing, Melee Weapons; max attack ?/«? ? Ranged weapon ?/? piercing, 10-20’, Ranged Weapons, max attack ?/? Engaged Attack: ???? Specialized Martial Skill (Action) When you make a martial attack at a target within the reach of an ally, you gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Engaged Attack rating. Opportunity Attack: ???? Specialized Martial Skill (Reaction) When a character uses an action that moves them out of your reach, you can immediately make a melee attack at that target. The attack’s energy cost is reduced by your Opportunity Attack rating. Human: Medium (Size 5-6’, Move 30’, Health 3 + twice Stamina, Reach 5’), Muscular Ranged weapon (?/?) 2H, SA Melee weapon (?/?) Armor (??)

                                  Striker Human Strength: ? Agility: ? Stamina: ? Influence: ? Intelligence: ? Acuity: ? Energy: «? Health: 9 PD: ??? MD: ?? Ranged Weapons (AGI): ???? Initiative (AGI): ???? Armor Training (STR): ?? Language (Native) (INT): ?? ? Ranged weapon ?/? piercing, 10-100’, Ranged Weapons, max attack ?/«? Engaged Attack: ???? Specialized Martial Skill (Passive Bonus) When you make a martial attack at a target within the reach of an ally, you gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Engaged Attack rating. Human: Medium (Size 5-6’, Move 30’, Health 3 + twice Stamina, Reach 5’), Lithe Ranged weapon (?/?) 2H, SA, BF, FA Armor (?)

                                  Caster Human Strength: ? Agility: ? Stamina: ? Influence: ? Intelligence: ? Acuity: ? Energy: «? Health: 7 PD: ?? MD: ??? Armor Training (STR): ? Language (Native) (INT): ?? Fiery Bolt: ???? Pyromancy Magic Intelligence Action Add energy to your action pool up to your INT rating, gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Fiery Bolt rating. Attack the PD of a target up to 25’ away. The target takes fire damage equal to the half the number of hits (rounded up). Flaming Touch: ???? Pyromancy Magic Intelligence Action Add energy to your action pool up to your INT rating, gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Flaming Touch rating. Attack the PD of a target within your reach. The target takes fire damage equal to the number of hits. Human: Medium (Size 5-6’, Move 30’, Health 3 + twice Stamina, Reach 5’), Astute Pyromancer Casting: You can train Pyromancy Magic skills Armor (?)

                                  Commander Human Strength: ? Agility: ? Stamina: ? Influence: ? Intelligence: ? Acuity: ? Energy: «? Health: 9 PD: ??? MD: ?? Melee Weapons (STR): ??? Perception (ACU): ? Ranged Weapons (AGI): ??? Knowledge (Military) (INT): ?? Armor Training (STR): ?? Language (Native) (INT): ?? ? Melee weapon ?/? piercing, Melee Weapons; max attack ?/? ? Ranged weapon ?/? piercing, 10-20’, Ranged Weapons, max attack ?/? Leader’s Pledge: ???? Specialized Martial Skill (Action) When an ally within 25’ can perceive you, you can spend energy equal to your Influence, up to your Leader’s Pledge rating. That ally gains ? bonus energy for each energy spent. This bonus energy lasts until the end of the target’s next turn. Human: Medium (Size 5-6’, Move 30’, Health 3 + twice Stamina, Reach 5’), Sensitive Ranged weapon (?/?) 2H, SA Melee weapon (?/?) Armor (?) Modern/Sci-Fi Adversaries – 12 Energy Grunt Human Strength: ? Agility: ? Stamina: ? Influence: ? Intelligence: ? Acuity: ? Energy: «? Health: 11 PD: ???? MD: ?? Melee Weapons (STR): ????? Perception (ACU): ??? Armor Training (STR): ??? Language (Native) (INT): ?? ? Melee weapon ?/? piercing, Melee Weapons; max attack ?/«? ? Ranged weapon ?/? piercing, 10-20’, Ranged Weapons, max attack ?/? Engaged Attack: ????? Specialized Martial Skill (Action) When you make a martial attack at a target within the reach of an ally, you gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Engaged Attack rating. Opportunity Attack: ????? Specialized Martial Skill (Reaction) When a character uses an action that moves them out of your reach, you can immediately make a melee attack at that target. The attack’s energy cost is reduced by your Opportunity Attack rating. Human: Medium (Size 5-6’, Move 30’, Health 3 + twice Stamina, Reach 5’), Muscular Ranged weapon (?/?) 2H, SA Melee weapon (?/?) Armor (??)

                                  Striker Human Strength: ? Agility: ? Stamina: ? Influence: ? Intelligence: ? Acuity: ? Energy: «? Health: 9 PD: ??? MD: ?? Ranged Weapons (AGI): ????? Initiative (AGI): ???? Armor Training (STR): ?? Language (Native) (INT): ?? ? Ranged weapon ?/? piercing, 10-100’, Ranged Weapons, max attack ?/«? Engaged Attack: ????? Specialized Martial Skill (Passive Bonus) When you make a martial attack at a target within the reach of an ally, you gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Engaged Attack rating. Human: Medium (Size 5-6’, Move 30’, Health 3 + twice Stamina, Reach 5’), Lithe Ranged weapon (?/?) 2H, SA, BF, FA Armor (?)

                                  Caster Human Strength: ? Agility: ? Stamina: ? Influence: ? Intelligence: ? Acuity: ? Energy: «? Health: 9 PD: ?? MD: ??? Armor Training (STR): ? Language (Native) (INT): ?? Fiery Bolt: ????? Pyromancy Magic Intelligence Action Add energy to your action pool up to your INT rating, gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Fiery Bolt rating. Attack the PD of a target up to 25’ away. The target takes fire damage equal to the half the number of hits (rounded up). Flaming Touch: ????? Pyromancy Magic Intelligence Action Add energy to your action pool up to your INT rating, gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Flaming Touch rating. Attack the PD of a target within your reach. The target takes fire damage equal to the number of hits. Human: Medium (Size 5-6’, Move 30’, Health 3 + twice Stamina, Reach 5’), Astute Pyromancer Casting: You can train Pyromancy Magic skills Armor (?)

                                  Commander Human Strength: ? Agility: ? Stamina: ? Influence: ? Intelligence: ? Acuity: ? Energy: «? Health: 9 PD: ??? MD: ?? Melee Weapons (STR): ???? Perception (ACU): ? Ranged Weapons (AGI): ??? Knowledge (Military) (INT): ?? Armor Training (STR): ?? Language (Native) (INT): ?? ? Melee weapon ?/? piercing, Melee Weapons; max attack ?/«? ? Ranged weapon ?/? piercing, 10-20’, Ranged Weapons, max attack ?/? Leader’s Pledge: ????? Specialized Martial Skill (Action) When an ally within 25’ can perceive you, you can spend energy equal to your Influence, up to your Leader’s Pledge rating. That ally gains ? bonus energy for each energy spent. This bonus energy lasts until the end of the target’s next turn. Human: Medium (Size 5-6’, Move 30’, Health 3 + twice Stamina, Reach 5’), Sensitive Ranged weapon (?/?) 2H, SA Melee weapon (?/?) Armor (?) Modern/Sci-Fi Adversaries – 15 Energy Grunt Human Strength: ? Agility: ? Stamina: ? Influence: ? Intelligence: ? Acuity: ? Energy: «? Health: 13 PD: ???? MD: ??? Melee Weapons (STR): ????? ? Perception (ACU): ?? Armor Training (STR): ??? Language (Native) (INT): ?? ? Melee weapon ?/? piercing, Melee Weapons; max attack: ?/«? ? Ranged weapon ?/? piercing, 10-20’, Ranged Weapons, max attack ?/? Engaged Attack: ????? ? Specialized Martial Skill (Action) When you make a martial attack at a target within the reach of an ally, you gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Engaged Attack rating. Opportunity Attack: ????? ? Specialized Martial Skill (Reaction) When a character uses an action that moves them out of your reach, you can immediately make a melee attack at that target. The attack’s energy cost is reduced by your Opportunity Attack rating. Human: Medium (Size 5-6’, Move 30’, Health 3 + twice Stamina, Reach 5’), Muscular Ranged weapon (?/?) 2H, SA Melee weapon (?/?) Armor (??)

                                  Striker Human Strength: ? Agility: ? Stamina: ? Influence: ? Intelligence: ? Acuity: ? Energy: «? Health: 11 PD: ??? MD: ??? Ranged Weapons (AGI): ????? ? Initiative (AGI): ????? ? Armor Training (STR): ?? Language (Native) (INT): ?? ? Ranged weapon ?/? piercing, 10-100’, Ranged Weapons, max attack ?/«? Engaged Attack: ????? ? Specialized Martial Skill (Passive Bonus) When you make a martial attack at a target within the reach of an ally, you gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Engaged Attack rating. Human: Medium (Size 5-6’, Move 30’, Health 3 + twice Stamina, Reach 5’), Lithe Ranged weapon (?/?) 2H, SA, BF, FA Armor (?)

                                  Caster Human Strength: ? Agility: ? Stamina: ? Influence: ? Intelligence: ? Acuity: ? Energy: «? Health: 9 PD: ?? MD: ????? Armor Training (STR): ? Language (Native) (INT): ?? Fiery Bolt: ????? ? Pyromancy Magic Intelligence Action Add energy to your action pool up to your INT rating, gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Fiery Bolt rating. Attack the PD of a target up to 25’ away. The target takes fire damage equal to the half the number of hits (rounded up). Flaming Touch: ????? ? Pyromancy Magic Intelligence Action Add energy to your action pool up to your INT rating, gain ? bonus die for each added energy, up to your Flaming Touch rating. Attack the PD of a target within your reach. The target takes fire damage equal to the number of hits. Human: Medium (Size 5-6’, Move 30’, Health 3 + twice Stamina, Reach 5’), Astute Pyromancer Casting: You can train Pyromancy Magic skills Armor (?)

                                  Commander Human Strength: ? Agility: ? Stamina: ? Influence: ? Intelligence: ? Acuity: ? Energy: «? Health: 11 PD: ??? MD: ???? Melee Weapons (STR): ????? Perception (ACU): ??? Ranged Weapons (AGI): ??? Knowledge (Military) (INT): ?? Armor Training (STR): ?? Language (Native) (INT): ??? ? Melee weapon ?/? piercing, Melee Weapons; max attack ?/«? ? Ranged weapon ?/? piercing, 10-20’, Ranged Weapons, max attack ?/? Leader’s Pledge: ????? ? Specialized Martial Skill (Action) When an ally within 25’ can perceive you, you can spend energy equal to your Influence, up to your Leader’s Pledge rating. That ally gains ? bonus energy for each energy spent. This bonus energy lasts until the end of the target’s next turn. Human: Medium (Size 5-6’, Move 30’, Health 3 + twice Stamina, Reach 5’), Sensitive Ranged weapon (?/?) 2H, SA Melee weapon (?/?) Armor (?)


                                  NEW PAGE Appendices

                                  Change LOG

                                  • 488: Updated to v1.1 for PDF and POD versions
                                  • 487: Aligned finesse weapons across Historical, Modern and Sci-Fi
                                  • 486: Included Explosions in Environmental Hazards, and refined Short Rests
                                  • 485: Revised Venomous trait to include Stamina test to end Poisoned condition
                                  • 484: Added heavy handgun/blaster weapons with ?/? cost
                                  • 483: Revised Armor Training specialized martial skill and armor equipment
                                  • 482: Revised Shield Training specialized martial skill and shield ratings
                                  • 481: Added Following Attack specialized martial skill
                                  • 480: Added Buying Equipment section
                                  • 479: Added Intelligence (Knowledge: Common) skill
                                  • 478: Added Assisting Attribute Tests section in Attribute Tests
                                  • 477: Revised Unarmored Defense skill and added Nimble Defense skill
                                  • 476: Fixed Nano-Swarm grenade activation
                                  • 475: Refined attack actions and Attacks section
                                  • 474: Bumped to version 1.0
                                  • 473: Tweaked Unarmored Defense and Dual Wield Attack
                                  • 472: Updated Introduction
                                  • 471: Updated character sheet
                                  • Added Environmental Hazards section
                                  • Refined Leader’s Pledge specialized martial skill
                                  • Refined Grapple action
                                  • Added modern and sci-fi adversaries for casters and commanders
                                  • Adjusted Necromancy skills to require living targets for healing
                                  • New foreword
                                  • Added modern and sci-fi adversaries for grunts and strikers
                                  • Added sci-fi species traits
                                  • Refactored fantasy species traits
                                  • Added Mental Traits
                                  • Added two more Character Build Samples
                                  • Reorganized the Martial Skills section
                                  • Further proofing and editing
                                  • Added Equipment Overview section
                                  • Proofing and editing pass
                                  • Editing, style, and cleanup
                                  • Minor fixes for digest format
                                  • Added Equipment – Sci-Fi to the Game Content section
                                  • New artwork, revisions to existing artwork
                                  • Revised Encounters, Combat Encounters, Adversary Templates sections
                                  • Revised Fundamentals section to incorporate core mechanics
                                  • Revised negative externalities to ‘lose’ dice from pools
                                  • Added Opportunity Attack to Grunt monster templates
                                  • Added Strikeback Attack specialized martial skill
                                  • Added Pressing Attack specialized martial skill
                                  • Revised order of Character Creation
                                  • Added templates for 12 and 15 Energy monsters
                                  • Updated cover with cover art and logo
                                  • Added Summoner flavor text
                                  • Refined Offensive Stance and Defensive Stance martial skills
                                  • Added new background texture image
                                  • Refined Damage and Death and Dying sections
                                  • Updated Traits section
                                  • Refactored melee and ranged weapon energy costs and ratings
                                  • Added Custom Monsters section
                                  • Expanded Custom Equipment section
                                  • Expanded Custom Martial Skills section
                                  • Added Custom General Skills section
                                  • Added Custom Traits section
                                  • Added Summoner school of magic
                                  • Reduced difficult of Shake It Off to 8
                                  • Changed Drinking to Resist
                                  • Added more examples
                                  • Added Creative Commons licensing
                                  • Revised traits for different species
                                  • Added Dual Shot Attack skill
                                  • Adjusted health recovery at short rests for larger characters
                                  • Adjusted Dual Wield Attack mechanics
                                  • Moved Traits section to start of Game Content
                                  • Added explosive weapons
                                  • Revised weapon range modifiers
                                  • Added Contributors section
                                  • Completed Movement and Travel section
                                  • Updated Conditions section
                                  • Changed combat skills to martial skills
                                  • Added descriptions of example Genres and Worlds
                                  • Added flavor descriptions to magic skills
                                  • Added flavor descriptions to general skills
                                  • Added flavor descriptions to martial skills
                                  • Reorganized healing and resting sections
                                  • Added reload ranged weapon to Minor Actions
                                  • Reorganized death and dying rules
                                  • Revised format of magic skills
                                  • Revised martial skills (again)
                                  • Revised magic skills
                                  • Updated monsters templates
                                  • Adjusted healing difficulty numbers
                                  • Added Telekinesis magic
                                  • Added some arts
                                  • Many small fixes
                                  • Adjusted armor to require Strength rating
                                  • Revised monster stat blocks
                                  • Added additional font glyphs
                                  • Revisions of all martial skills
                                  • Changed column width to 12cm
                                  • Replaced ‘attack pool’ with ‘action pool’
                                  • Adjusted terminology for gained dice
                                  • Multitude of small fixes
                                  • Fixed some incorrect skills in weapon listings
                                  • Added clarification for PD in defenses examples
                                  • Clarified terminology: Health is recovered
                                  • Clarified terminology: Expended energy is recovered
                                  • Clarified terminology: Spent energy is regained
                                  • Added Distracting Taunt specialized martial skill
                                  • Rearranged combat section to include concurrent turn description
                                  • Added ranges for crossbow weapons
                                  • Adjusted Prone condition
                                  • Specified that reach weapons extend immediate range
                                  • Added Coherent Mind specialized martial skill
                                  • Added Dual Wield Attack specialized martial skill
                                  • Added Suck It Up specialized martial skill
                                  • Added Take The Initiative specialized martial skill
                                  • Added Gunslinger character build sample
                                  • Added character sheet (it’s in the back)
                                  • Added Shrouding Strike Specialized Martial Skill
                                  • Added example difficult ratings to the Running attribute Tests section
                                  • Updated Dice Pool Probabilities with more statistics
                                  • Updated Externalities section with example bonuses and penalties
                                  • Added sections for Custom Content
                                  • Added Encounter Type section
                                  • Added Combat Encounter Design section
                                  • Added Running Combat Encounters section
                                  • Formatted comparison of skill lists from other RPGs
                                  • Added links to trait and skill pages in character creation section
                                  • Removed explicit limit on the maximum ratings of attributes and skills
                                  • Added Movement Speed to character creation
                                  • Updated format of ranged weapon equipment to simplify range penalties
                                  • Updated armor to limit Agility when using heavy armor types
                                  • Changed appearance of boxes; rules, examples, conditions, equipment, etc
                                  • Refined appearance of monster stat blocks
                                  • Added some soldier ‘monsters’
                                  • Work on format of monster stat block
                                  • Yet more work on format of character builds
                                  • Updated Movement and Travel section
                                  • Added Wind-Up Attack specialized martial skill
                                  • More work on format of character builds
                                  • Added Rewards and Progression
                                  • Updated Combat Turns description
                                  • Updated Resolving Influence Tests
                                  • Updated Character Build template
                                  • Updated Combat Turns description
                                  • Added diagram showing flow of combat turns and rounds

                                  Rpg Skill Lists Comparison

                                  Atomic Highway

                                  Atomic Highway has 20 basic skills:

                                  • Athletics
                                  • Boat
                                  • Brawl
                                  • Criminal
                                  • Drive
                                  • Heal
                                  • Intimidate
                                  • Lore
                                  • Melee
                                  • Notice
                                  • Persuade
                                  • Pilot
                                  • Ride
                                  • Scavenge
                                  • Shoot
                                  • Sleight
                                  • Stealth
                                  • Survive
                                  • Tech
                                  • Zoofinity

                                  Blue Planet’s Synergy

                                  Blue Planet has 20 basic skills:

                                  • Administration
                                  • Agriculture
                                  • Athletics
                                  • Combat
                                  • Command
                                  • Communication
                                  • Culture
                                  • Fine Arts
                                  • Firearms
                                  • Human Sciences
                                  • Life Sciences
                                  • Medicine
                                  • Military Weapons
                                  • Physical Sciences
                                  • Stealth
                                  • Subterfuge
                                  • Survival
                                  • Tech
                                  • Vehicles

                                  Bulldogs!

                                  Bulldogs! has 28 basic skills:

                                  • Academics
                                  • Alertness
                                  • Artillery
                                  • Athletics
                                  • Burglary
                                  • Contacting
                                  • Deceit
                                  • Empathy
                                  • Endurance
                                  • Engineering
                                  • Fists
                                  • Gambling
                                  • Guns
                                  • Intimidation
                                  • Investigation
                                  • Leadership
                                  • Medicine
                                  • Might
                                  • Pilot
                                  • Psychic
                                  • Rapport
                                  • Resolve
                                  • Sleight of Hand
                                  • Stealth
                                  • Survival
                                  • Systems
                                  • Trading
                                  • Weapons

                                  Cortex – Supernatural

                                  Cortex ” Supernatural has 23 basic skills:

                                  • Animals
                                  • Artistry
                                  • Athletics
                                  • Covert
                                  • Craft
                                  • Discipline
                                  • Drive
                                  • Guns
                                  • Heavy Weapons
                                  • Influence
                                  • Knowledge
                                  • Lore
                                  • Mechanic
                                  • Medicine
                                  • Melee Weapons
                                  • Perception
                                  • Performance
                                  • Pilot
                                  • Ranged Weapons
                                  • Science
                                  • Survival
                                  • Tech
                                  • Unarmed Combat

                                  Diaspora

                                  Diaspora has 37 skills:

                                  • Agility
                                  • Aircraft
                                  • Alertness
                                  • Animal Handler
                                  • Archaeology
                                  • Arts
                                  • Assets
                                  • Brawling
                                  • Brokerage
                                  • Bureaucracy
                                  • Charm
                                  • Close Combat
                                  • Communications
                                  • Computer
                                  • Culture/Tech
                                  • Demolitions
                                  • EVA
                                  • Energy Weapons
                                  • Engineering
                                  • Gunnery
                                  • Intimidation
                                  • Languages
                                  • Medical
                                  • Microg
                                  • Navigation
                                  • Oratory
                                  • Pilot
                                  • Profession (Type)
                                  • Repair
                                  • Resolve
                                  • Science
                                  • Slug Throwers
                                  • Stamina
                                  • Stealth
                                  • Survival
                                  • Tactics
                                  • Vehicle

                                  Dr. Who

                                  Dr. Who has 12 basic skills:

                                  • Athletics
                                  • Convince
                                  • Craft
                                  • Fighting
                                  • Knowledge
                                  • Marksman
                                  • Medicine
                                  • Science
                                  • Subterfuge
                                  • Survival
                                  • Technology
                                  • Transport

                                  Dresden Files RPG

                                  The Dresden Files RPG has 25 basic skills:

                                  • Alertness
                                  • Athletics
                                  • Burglary
                                  • Contacts
                                  • Conviction
                                  • Craftsmanship
                                  • Deceit
                                  • Discipline
                                  • Driving
                                  • Empathy
                                  • Endurance
                                  • Fists
                                  • Guns
                                  • Intimidation
                                  • Investigation
                                  • Lore
                                  • Might
                                  • Performance
                                  • Presence
                                  • Rapport
                                  • Resources
                                  • Scholarship
                                  • Stealth
                                  • Survival
                                  • Weapons

                                  Fireborn

                                  Fireborn has 18 basic skills:

                                  • Athletics
                                  • Casting
                                  • Craft
                                  • Interaction
                                  • Ka
                                  • Knowledge
                                  • Medicine
                                  • Melee
                                  • Quickness
                                  • Ranged
                                  • Research
                                  • Senses
                                  • Stamina
                                  • Stealth
                                  • Tech
                                  • Travel
                                  • Trickery
                                  • Will

                                  The Kerberos Club

                                  The Kerberos Club has 28 basic skills:

                                  • Academics
                                  • Alertness
                                  • Arms
                                  • Art
                                  • Athletics
                                  • Brawn
                                  • Bureaucracy
                                  • Burglary
                                  • Contacting
                                  • Craftsmanship
                                  • Deceit
                                  • Drive
                                  • Empathy
                                  • Endurance
                                  • Fisticuffs
                                  • Horsemanship
                                  • Intimidation
                                  • Investigation
                                  • Marksmanship
                                  • Occultism
                                  • Pilot
                                  • Presence
                                  • Resolve
                                  • Resources
                                  • Science
                                  • Seamanship
                                  • Stealth
                                  • Survival

                                  Legends of Anglerre

                                  Legends of Andlerre has 27 basic skills:

                                  • Academics
                                  • Alertness
                                  • Art
                                  • Artificer
                                  • Athletics
                                  • Burglary
                                  • Contacting
                                  • Deceit
                                  • Drive
                                  • Empathy
                                  • Endurance
                                  • Fists
                                  • Gambling
                                  • Intimidation
                                  • Investigation
                                  • Leadership
                                  • Melee Weapons
                                  • Might
                                  • Pilot
                                  • Ranged Weapons
                                  • Rapport
                                  • Resolve
                                  • Resources
                                  • Science
                                  • Sleight of Hand
                                  • Stealth
                                  • Survival

                                  Plus 18 Power skills for its magic system:

                                  • Alchemy
                                  • Creatures
                                  • Death
                                  • Dimensions
                                  • Divination
                                  • Domination
                                  • Elements
                                  • Fate
                                  • Glamour
                                  • Life
                                  • Nature
                                  • Telekinesis
                                  • Time
                                  • Transmutation
                                  • War
                                  • Warding
                                  • Weather
                                  • Wild Magic

                                  Savage Worlds

                                  Savage Worlds has 23 skills, associated with 4 attributes:

                                  • Boating (Agility)
                                  • Climbing (Strength)
                                  • Driving (Agility)
                                  • Fighting (Agility)
                                  • Gambling (Smarts)
                                  • Healing (Smarts)
                                  • Intimidation (Spirit)
                                  • Investigation (Smarts)
                                  • Knowledge (Smarts)
                                  • Lockpicking (Agility)
                                  • Notice (Smarts)
                                  • Persuasion (Spirit)
                                  • Piloting (Agility)
                                  • Repair (Smarts)
                                  • Riding (Agility)
                                  • Shooting (Agility)
                                  • Stealth (Agility)
                                  • Streetwise (Smarts)
                                  • Survival (Smarts)
                                  • Swimming (Agility)
                                  • Taunt (Smarts)
                                  • Throwing (Agility)
                                  • Tracking (Smarts)

                                  Spirit of the Century

                                  Spirit of the Century has 28 skills:

                                  • Academics
                                  • Alertness
                                  • Art
                                  • Athletics
                                  • Burglary
                                  • Contacting
                                  • Deceit
                                  • Drive
                                  • Empathy
                                  • Endurance
                                  • Engineering
                                  • Fists
                                  • Gambling
                                  • Guns
                                  • Intimidation
                                  • Investigation
                                  • Leadership
                                  • Might
                                  • Mysteries
                                  • Pilot
                                  • Rapport
                                  • Resolve
                                  • Resources
                                  • Science
                                  • Sleight of Hand
                                  • Stealth
                                  • Survival
                                  • Weapons

                                  Starblazer Adventures

                                  Starblazer Adventures has 31 basic skills:

                                  • Academics
                                  • Alertness
                                  • Art
                                  • Athletics
                                  • Burglary
                                  • Contacting
                                  • Deceit
                                  • Drive
                                  • Empathy
                                  • Endurance
                                  • Engineering
                                  • Fists
                                  • Gambling
                                  • Guns
                                  • Intimidation
                                  • Investigation
                                  • Leadership
                                  • Might
                                  • Mysteries
                                  • Pilot
                                  • Rapport
                                  • Resolve
                                  • Resources
                                  • Science
                                  • Sleight of Hand
                                  • Starship Gunnery
                                  • Starship Pilot
                                  • Starship Systems
                                  • Stealth
                                  • Survival
                                  • Weapons

                                  Plus 9 Special Ability skills:

                                  • Absorb energy
                                  • Barb Thrower
                                  • Exude energy
                                  • Fly
                                  • Mimic
                                  • Ooze
                                  • Pheromones
                                  • Stretchy
                                  • Toxic

                                  And 6 Psionic skills:

                                  • Empathic Talent
                                  • Mental Bolt
                                  • Mind Control
                                  • Postcognition
                                  • Telekinesis
                                  • Telepathy

                                  Storytelling

                                  The Storytelling system has 24 basic skills:

                                  • Academics
                                  • Animal Ken
                                  • Athletics
                                  • Brawl
                                  • Computer
                                  • Crafts
                                  • Drive
                                  • Empathy
                                  • Expression
                                  • Firearms
                                  • Intimidation
                                  • Investigation
                                  • Larceny
                                  • Medicine
                                  • Occult
                                  • Persuasion
                                  • Politics
                                  • Science
                                  • Socialize
                                  • Stealth
                                  • Streetwise
                                  • Subterfuge
                                  • Survival
                                  • Weaponry

                                  Cinematic Unisystem

                                  Cinematic Unisystem has 18 basic skills:

                                  • Acrobatics
                                  • Art
                                  • Computers
                                  • Crime
                                  • Doctor
                                  • Driving
                                  • Getting Medieval
                                  • Gun Fu
                                  • Influence
                                  • Knowledge
                                  • Kung Fu
                                  • Languages
                                  • Mr. Fix-It
                                  • Notice
                                  • Occultism
                                  • Science
                                  • Sports
                                  • Wild Card

                                  Wild Talents

                                  Wild Talents has 29 basic skills:

                                  • Athletics
                                  • Block
                                  • Brawling
                                  • Dodge
                                  • Driving (Type)
                                  • Empathy
                                  • Endurance
                                  • First Aid
                                  • Knowledge (Type)
                                  • Interrogation
                                  • Intimidation
                                  • Language (Type)
                                  • Leadership
                                  • Lie
                                  • Medicine
                                  • Melee Weapon [Type]
                                  • Navigation
                                  • Perception
                                  • Performance [Type]
                                  • Persuasion
                                  • Ranged Weapon (Type)
                                  • Research
                                  • Security Systems
                                  • Scrutiny
                                  • Stability
                                  • Stealth
                                  • Streetwise
                                  • Survival
                                  • Tactics

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                                  Forge Engine Universal Role-Playing System
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