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Complex Hazards

Complex Hazards: Elemental Boundaries and Beyond

Of course, creating singular damaging areas is not the end of the options presented by the hazard engine. The following four examples serve to illustrate different applications of the hazards, staring with areas of the Underworld where the Elemental Planes overlap with everyday material planes. Such places begin to bend the laws of physics in the real world—heat and pressure, for instance, that aren’t experienced anywhere else on the planet—and so it would be reasonable to introduce the idea of magic being warped, creatures having strange variations to their traits and abilities, and items existing for the sole purpose of countering a particular localized event and proving to be hazardous elsewhere.

Boundaries such as these may be a good place to introduce experiences with the Elemental Chaos. Parties can attempt to endure the intense excesses each element displays as it seeks dominance over the others, yet have some assurance they have an escape route, albeit a hazardous one.

The tables’ saving throw DCs and damage values have been taken from elsewhere and then freely mixed and matched to best represent the nature of the respective plane and its hazards. Tables 12-1 to 12-4 suggest how a GM can summarize the effects of complex and chaotic environments.

Table 12-1: Sample Hazards Experienced at Boundaries with the Plane of Air
Hazard Minor Moderate Major Severe
Increased air rate for 1 minute or more < 33 knots (<37 mph; <60 km/h) 33+ knots (38+ mph; 61 km/h) 65+ knots (75+ mph; 120 km/h) 140+ knots (160+ mph; 260+ km/h)
Sudden changes of temperature +/- 5° Celsius/10° Fahrenheit +/- 10° Celsius/20° Fahrenheit +/- 15° Celsius/30° Fahrenheit +/- 20° Celsius/40° Fahrenheit
Density/pressure changes alter speed Lower density/pressure; +5 feet
Higher density/pressure; -5 feet
Lower density/pressure; +10 feet
Higher density/pressure; -10 feet
Lower density/pressure; +15 feet
Higher density/pressure; -15 feet
Lower density/pressure; +20 feet
Higher density/pressure; -20 feet
Gravity changes, angle and distance 45° change of direction, 50 feet 90° change of direction, 100 feet 135° change of direction, 150 feet 180° change of direction, 200 feet
Lightning activity within and around 1d2+1 bolts/round, DC 11 Dexterity saving throw to avoid, 7 (2d6) lightning damage/bolt 1d2+2 bolts/round, DC 15 Dexterity saving throw to avoid, 13 (3d8) lightning damage/bolt 1d2+3 bolts/round, DC 20 Dexterity saving throw to avoid, 22 (4d10) lightning damage/bolt 1d2+4 bolts/round, DC 25 Dexterity saving throw to avoid, 35 (10d6) lightning damage/bolt
Changes in oxygen content (from 20%) -4%; heart rate up +4%; lungs issues DC 5 Constitution saving throw after 1 minute of strenuous activity or disadvantage on Wisdom (Perception) checks; passive Perception reduced by 2 -8%; poor judgment +8%; vision issues DC 12 Constitution saving throw after 1 minute of strenuous activity or disadvantage on Wisdom checks; passive Perception reduced by 3 -12%; vomiting +12%; seizures DC 16 Constitution saving throw after 1 minute of strenuous activity or disadvantage and Dexterity and Wisdom checks and Dexterity and Wisdom saving throws; passive Perception reduced by 4 -16%; convulsions +16%; organ damage DC 20 Constitution saving throw after 1 minute of strenuous activity or disadvantage on Dexterity, Constitution and Wisdom checks and Dexterity, Constitution and Wisdom saving throws; passive Perception reduced by 6
Dust and smoke clouds DC 5 Constitution saving throw or blinded unless in protection; lightly obscured; +1 to AC DC 12 Constitution saving throw or blinded unless in protection; lightly obscured; half cover DC 16 Constitution saving throw or blinded unless in protection; heavily obscured; three-quarters cover DC 20 Constitution saving throw or blinded unless in protection; heavily obscured; total cover
Biological matter of various sizes 1d3 spores/person; +0 to hit, 3 (1d6) acid damage 1d4 spores/person; +5 to hit, 9 (2d8) acid damage 1d5 spores/person; +7 to hit, 16 (3d10) acid damage 1d6 spores/person; +9 to hit, 27 (5d10) acid damage
Poisonous and other toxic material DC 11 Constitution saving throw or take; 7 (2d6) poison damage and be poisoned; or 1/2 damage if successful and not poisoned DC 17 Constitution saving throw or take; 13 (2d12) poison damage and be poisoned; or 1/2 damage if successful and not poisoned DC 22 Constitution saving throw or take; 22 (4d10) poison damage and be poisoned; or 1/2 damage if successful and not poisoned DC 25 Constitution saving throw or take; 35 (10d6) poison damage and be poisoned; or 1/2 damage if successful and not poisoned
Winds Weak, insignificant winds, Speed reduced by 5 feet when moving against them, increased when moving with them Strong, significant winds, Speed reduced by 10 feet when moving against them; potentially lose momentum; Speed increased by 10 feet when moving with them; potentially gain momentum Violent, significant winds, Speed reduced by 20 feet when moving against them; potentially lose momentum; Speed increased by 20 feet when moving with them; potentially gain momentum Violent, intense winds, Speed reduced by 25 feet when moving against them; potentially lose momentum; Speed increased by 30 feet when moving with them; potentially gain momentum
Falling Heavy Objects +1 to hit; 7 (2d6) bludgeoning damage +5 to hit, 13 (2d12) bludgeoning damage +10 to hit, 27 (5d10) bludgeoning damage +15 to hit, 42 (12d6) bludgeoning damage

Elemental Boundaries: Air

While nexus to many other planes are possible, those to the Elemental Planes are most likely to be dominated by links to the Plane of Air. Sky winds whip around peaks and canyons and find ways to bore into the crust, carving the rock into fascinating shapes, causing entrances through softer rock to appear, and even wearing this layer away entirely.

The examples below are taken from effects of real-world hurricanes, typhoons, and cyclones. Some examples cause damage while others hinder progress or performance and all of them introduce an unexpected element of game play requiring players to think creatively.

Elemental Boundaries: Fire

While extreme heat is fire’s most obvious danger, it is what this heat does to other elements and the air itself that can be unexpectedly deadly. Oxygen burns away and is replaced by hazardous compounds. Raised temperatures can steadily make breathing impossible, damaging lungs and oxygen-carrying blood.

As the heat intensifies, reliably solid materials begin to soften, losing shape or even liquifying; at jaw-dropping extremes, these now-fluid materials may even see their constituent elements vaporize on reaching such higher temperatures. It’s possible for materials to sublimate—go from a solid straight to a gas—on sudden exposure to such heat. Unprepared flesh melts and bones char quickly, leaving only ash.

Table 12-2: Sample Hazards Experienced at Boundaries with the Plane of Fire
Hazard Minor Moderate Major Severe
Fire whirls and firestorms +4 to hit; 10 (3d6) fire damage in a 10-foot radius +6 to hit; 17 (5d6) fire damage in a 20-foot radius +10 to hit; 28 (8d6) fire damage in a 30-foot radius +14 to hit; 38 (11d6) fire damage in a 40-foot radius
Explosive gases and fiery particles 10-foot-radius sphere; DC 12 Dexterity saving throw or 10 (4d4) fire damage 20-foot-radius sphere; DC 16 Dexterity saving throw or 16 (3d10) fire damage 30-foot-radius sphere; DC 18 Dexterity saving throw or 27 (5d10) fire damage 50-foot-radius sphere; DC 24 Dexterity saving throw or 38 (11d6) fire damage
Sample combustion points Leather/parchment, 205° C/405° F Paper, 233° C/451° F Ethanol/alcohol, 365° C/690° F Calcium/bone, 790° C/1450° F
Raised upper temperatures 55° C/130° F, high Earth air temp. 70° C/160° F, high from-satellite temp. 90° C/195° F, high Earth ground temp. 105° C/212° F water boils below ground
Liquefied and boiling metal (e.g. iron) 770° C/1418° F iron loses magnetism 1450° C/2640° F iron begins to melt 1538° C/2800° F iron melting point 2682° C/5182° F iron boiling point
White smoke explosionA DC 12 Dexterity saving throw or 5 (2d4) bludgeoning and 5 (2d4) fire damage and be blown away 20 feet, or half damage and not be blown away on a success DC 16 Dexterity saving throw or 11 (1d20) bludgeoning and 11 (1d20) fire damage and be blown away 30 feet, or half damage and not be blown away on a success; potentially gain momentum DC 18 Dexterity saving throw or 16 (3d10) bludgeoning and 16 (3d10) fire damage and be blown away 45 feet, or half damage and not be blown away on a success; potentially gain momentum DC 24 Dexterity saving throw or 27 (5d10) bludgeoning and 27 (5d10) fire damage and be blown away 30 feet, or half damage and not be blown away on a success; potentially gain momentum
Internal warming and hyperthermia DC 11 Constitution saving throw every minute or suffer hyperthermia DC 14 Constitution saving throw every minute or suffer hyperthermia DC 18 Constitution saving throw every minute or suffer hyperthermia DC 21 Constitution saving throw every round or suffer hyperthermia
Damaging effects of pyrolysisB Poisonous invisible gases; DC 11 Constitution saving throw or poisoned for 1 hour Fumes; DC 13 Constitution saving throw or incapacitated for 1 hour Polluting fog; DC 15 Constitution saving throw or paralyzed for 1 hour Toxic clouds; DC 17 Constitution saving throw or reduced to 0 hit points and dying
Critical heat flux damage to items +5 to hit; on a hit, item unusable for 10 minutes +8 to hit; on a hit, item unusable until after a short rest +11 to hit; on a hit, item unusable until after a long rest +14 to hit; on a hit, item unusable for 1 day
Forging temperaturesD 960° C/1760° F, pure silver affected 1060° C/1945° F, pure gold affected 1510° C/2750° F, steel affected 1770° C/3220° F, platinum affected

A A white smoke explosion occurs when a large buildup of smoke becomes extremely hot, and the cloud ignites in its entirety at a single moment. In addition to fire damage, it usually delivers structural damage caused by pressure waves and ignores any damage threshold of 15 or less.

B Pyrolysis is the decomposition of materials at high temperature although said material is not burning. Anyone who touches an item undergoing pyrolysis may also experience the same effects as if the material was actively being consumed by flames rather than heat.

C Critical heat flux is the thermal limit of a phenomenon at which point clear change occurs during heating (such as bubbles forming on a metal surface used to heat water). These deformities suddenly decrease the efficiency of heat transfer, thus causing localized overheating of the heating surface and rendering items unusable, even if temporarily.

D Forging temperature is the temperature at which a metal becomes substantially softer but is lower than the melting temperature. If metals, for example coins, pass this temperature they begin to liquefy or become a single mass on cooling. If held at their forging temperature they can be reshaped.

Elemental Boundaries: Water

With many tunnels and caverns having nowhere from which to replenish oxygen once they are flooded, those who manage a boundary with the Plane of Water are canny enough to ensure such dead-end spaces can be overwhelmed quickly by fast-moving torrents or flash floods.

Personal preparation for and adaptation to these conditions will tax even the most experienced of travelers in the Underworld, not least because of the need to protect themselves regularly from two elements: water, and the all-too often existing heat. Therefore, the examples below reflect the intense nature of this realm, with the dangers greater than elsewhere as the environment is almost certainly going to be entirely alien to humanoids.

Table 12-3: Sample Hazards Experienced at Boundaries with the Plane of Water
Hazard Minor Moderate Major Severe
Changes to acidity or alkalinity +4 to hit; 10 (3d6) acid damage in a 10-foot radius +6 to hit; 17 (5d6) acid damage in a 20-foot radius +10 to hit; 28 (8d6) acid damage in a 30-foot radius +14 to hit; 38 (11d6) acid damage in a 40-foot radius
Increase or decrease in temperature +/- 10° C/20 °F +/- 20° C/40° F +/- 30 °C/60° F +/- 40° C/80° F
Sudden and/or violent currents 45° random change of direction, DC 12 Dexterity saving throw or moved 20 feet; possibly gain momentum 90° random change of direction, DC 16 Dexterity saving throw or moved 40 feet; possibly gain momentum 135° random change of direction, DC 18 Dexterity saving throw or moved 60 feet; possibly gain momentum 180° random change of direction, DC 22 Dexterity saving throw or moved 80 feet; possibly gain momentum
Pressure changes affect movement Lower; Speed increases by +10 feet; Higher; Speed decreases by -10 foot (minimum Speed 5 feet) Lower; Speed increases by +15 feet; Higher; Speed decreases by -15 foot (minimum Speed 5 feet) Lower; Speed increases by +20 feet; Higher; Speed decreases by -20 foot (minimum Speed 0 feet) Lower; Speed increases by +25 feet; Higher; Speed decreases by -25 feet (minimum Speed 0 feet)
Effects of venting, e.g. acidic sulfuric fumes 5-by-30-foot line, 7 (2d6) acid or poison damage, DC 12 Dexterity saving throw for half 5-by-40-foot line, 10 (3d6) acid or poison damage, DC 14 Dexterity saving throw for half 10-by-40-foot line, 14 (4d6) acid or poison damage, DC 16 Dexterity saving throw for half 10-by-50-foot line, 17 (5d6) acid or poison damage, DC 18 Dexterity saving throw for half
Reduction in vision due to solids/steam Minor Cover, +1 bonus to AC and Dexterity saving throws Half cover Three-quarters cover Total cover
Black or white smokers E Both of “Minor” temperature change and venting effects Both of “Moderate” temperature change and venting effects Both of “Major” temperature change and venting effects Both of “Severe” temperature change and venting effects
Sudden and/or perpetual darkness Safe speed reduced by ¼, some light required Safe speed reduced by 1/2, vision as dim light Safe speed reduced by ¾, vision as darkness Safe speed reduced to 0 feet, effectively blinded
Increase in solidity due to freezing Speed reduces 15 feet (minimum Speed 0 feet) Temp. 10° C/50° F Speed reduces 20 feet (minimum Speed 0 feet) Temp. 5° C/41° F Speed reduces 25 feet (minimum Speed 0 feet) Temp. 0° C/32° F Speed reduces 30 feet (minimum Speed 0 feet) Temp. -5° C/23° F
Changes in salinity and toxicity DC 12 Constitution saving throw or suffer a level of exhaustion DC 16 Constitution saving throw or suffer a level of exhaustion; start at level 3, if less exhausted DC 18 Constitution saving throw or suffer a level of exhaustion, start at level 4 if less exhausted DC 20 Constitution saving throw or suffer a level of exhaustion, start at level 5 if less exhausted

E Black and white smokers are deep water vents that release super-heated water into the near-freezing depths in which the chimneys form. Black smokers, found in waters where the pressure is equivalent to depths of 1.25–1.8 miles/2–3 km on Earth, release materials with high levels of sulfur, such as zinc, copper, and iron.

White smokers emit materials lighter in color, including barium, calcium, and sodium. They are cooler than black smokers as they emerge further from a heat source. Either type may form as fields of shorter chimneys or one colossal structure many dozens of feet tall.

From a gaming standpoint, the site of a field of smokers is interesting in that it could be taken to be a nexus point for all four elements. With the release of super-heated, mineral-rich water, they clearly touch the Planes of Earth, Fire and Water in rapid succession, if not simultaneously, so it doesn’t take a lot to surmise that bubbles of air or other gases also exist in the mix.

On Earth, the fact that many strange and bizarre hybrid creatures live in and around these vents is also a reason to believe that not just the four main Elemental Planes, but also the quasi-elemental ones as well, can all be accessed from a single massive smoker. Reaching such an iconic natural nexus would be an immense challenge; facing the creatures that live around it another. The political and religious chicanery that took place on a day-to-day basis at such a site would put the events of, say, ancient Jerusalem, in the shade.

Elemental Boundaries: Earth

Mostly consisting of solid rock, home only to creatures that are able to burrow through dense material as if it wasn’t there, or are incorporeal beings able to exist in the slimmest of cracks and crevasses, these regions are extremely dangerous to most humanoids, open impassable. In either case, gaps created in the mass as a whole usually disappear in minutes, if not moments, and no space suitable for an average humanoid to move around in or along every persists for more than an hour.

Gateways are still found, however, especially where there is a change in composition of the dense metals and compact rock.

Table 12-4: Sample Hazards Experienced at Boundaries with the Plane of Earth
Hazard Minor Moderate Major Severe
Increasingly inviolable density 1/2 Speed without magic (minimum 5 feet) 1/3 Speed without magic (minimum 5 feet) ¼ Speed without magic (minimum 0 feet) 1/10 Speed without magic (minimum 0 feet)
Crushing pressure and suffocation DC 6 Constitution saving throw every hour or incapacitated DC 12 Constitution saving throw every hour or restrained DC 18 Constitution saving throw every hour or stunned DC 24 Constitution saving throw every hour or unconscious
Irresistible natural moving items F 100 feet/minute for 5d4 minutes; potentially gain momentum 150 feet/minute for 5d6 minutes; potentially gain momentum 200 feet/minute for 5d8 minutes; potentially gain momentum 250 feet/minute for 5d10 minutes; potentially gain momentum
Immovable natural objects Detour of 1d4 miles and/or 1d3 hours; potential of getting lost in the dark (Getting Lost, page 80) Detour of 2d4 miles and/or 1d4 hours; potential of getting lost in the dark (Getting Lost, page 80) Detour of 3d4 miles and/or 1d6 hours; potential of getting lost in the dark (Getting Lost, page 80) Detour of 4d4 miles and/or 1d8 hours; potential of getting lost in the dark (Getting Lost, page 80)
Metals in liquid and near-gaseous form DC 12 Dexterity saving throw or as fireball DC 14 Dexterity saving throw or as flame strike DC 16 Dexterity saving throw or as fire storm DC 18 Dexterity saving throw or as meteor swarm
Spontaneous deep-rooted plant life DC 12 Dexterity saving throw or as entangle DC 14 Dexterity saving throw or as plant growth DC 16 Dexterity saving throw or as wall of thorns using a 6th-level spell slot DC 18 Dexterity saving throw or as wall of thorns using a 9th-level spell slot
Too little water, so constantly stony ground +1 unit of stock/day required to stave off thirst +2 units of stock/day required to stave off thirst +3 units of stock/day required to stave off thirst +4 units of stock/day required to stave off thirst
Too much water, holds sewer plague DC 12 Constitution saving throw every day or fall ill in 1d4 days DC 14 Constitution saving throw every day or fall ill in 6d4 hours DC 16 Constitution saving throw every day or fall ill in 2d3 hours DC 18 Constitution saving throw every day or fall ill in 20d6 minutes
Earth as cold, dry black bile G DC 6 Wisdom saving throw every hour or affected by confusion DC 11 Wisdom saving throw every hour or affected by short-term madness DC 18 Wisdom saving throw every hour or affected by long-term madness DC 24 Wisdom saving throw every hour or affected by indefinite madness
“Falling earth” disorientates H DC 16 Intelligence saving throw realigns or confusion, lasting 2d4 rounds DC 18 Intelligence saving throw realigns or confusion, lasting 2d6 rounds DC 22 Intelligence saving throw realigns or confusion, lasting 2d8 rounds DC 26 Intelligence saving throw realigns or confusion, lasting 2d10 rounds

F These items include, but are not limited to: lava; banks of rocks and boulders; floors and ceilings each moving up or down; and solid walls that move across caves and along tunnels.

G One ancient belief about dark earth is that it represents melancholia in the form of a black bile. The hazard presented here is linked closely to the mental state of those who spend long tracts of time below ground when they are used to the light and warmth of the surface.

H There is an Aristotelian notion that earth is always falling and that it is difficult to go “up” unless the correct current is found. This can be put down to a number of possibilities including:

  • pockets of earth infused with wild elemental energy rapidly fluctuating their gravitational identity to the extent that even dwarves begin to lose their innate links with stone
  • minerals within the earth, for example arsenic, which seem to have a beneficial effect in small quantities, but damage functions of the brain in larger mounts
  • bacteria or viruses that either deaden or confound the brain’s sense of gravity
  • a psychological feeling that the “weight of the world” is bearing down on you
  • trace quantities of material similar to a lodestone that gradually add weight to muscles and bone

Of course, there are more applications for the hazard-engine. The ideas below are there to illustrate the point and show you how to, e.g., combine different engines; feel free to let your imagination run wild as the characters encounter the full otherworldliness of your Underworld.

Body Parts

The hazard engine can be used to create magical properties for organs of butchered creatures (Sustenance and Butchering) on the fly. Here are some examples:

Dragon Amygdala

Source dragon (any true dragon)
Identify DC 20; Negate DC 22
Minimum Cleaning Surgical Dissection

Effect The amygdala of a dragon may be consumed by a spellcaster, which takes 10 minutes of chewing. The spellcaster immediately regains a number of expended spell slots equal to the challenge rating of the dragon from which the amygdala was sourced.

Spore Pouch

Source varies, usually plant (any fungal creature)
Identify DC 10; Negate DC 12
Source fungal creature
Minimum Cleaning Efficient Cleaning

Effect The creature’s spore pouch holds acidic or poisonous spores, and may be thrown as a ranged attack, inflicting major acid or poison damage in a 10-foot-radius sphere. A successful Dexterity saving throw against a major environmental hazard DC results in half damage. Poisonous spores may inflict the poisoned condition on a failed Constitution saving throw against a moderate environmental hazard DC.

Tongue Cluster

Source aberration (gibbering mouther)
Identify DC 15; Negate DC 17
Minimum Cleaning Thorough Butchering

Effect A gibbering mouther’s tongue cluster allows you to wring sufficient spittle to either drink immediately and cast confusion with a moderate environmental hazard DC, or to save it for later to produce ink that can only be read by those affected by confusion or who currently suffer from the effects of a madness.

~~~ Helpful Hazards

Of course, some hazards may well be helpful for the party and act as terrain features that allow them to withstand overwhelming odds! Here is an example for such a feature:

Colloid Nexus

Huge Object

Armor Class 20
Hit Points 200 Damage Threshold 5 Damage Immunities: acid, radiant, poison; Damage Vulnerabilities thunder

A massive crystalline structure rising from the colloid, this structure pulses with electric surges that arc through it. So long as that the colloid is currently aware (Colloid Awareness) of the party or of enemies, it may choose to lend its aid. A character can touch a colloid nexus and direct it to fire its potent energies—the colloid is particularly likely to help annihilate the undead. A nexus blast has the following properties:

Nexus Blast. Ranged Spell Attack: +10 to hit (or the character’s to hit, if higher), range 200/800 ft., all targets in a 10-foot-wide line. Hit: 56 (16d6) radiant damage. Alternatively, the nexus blast can take the shape of an 80-foot-radius sphere surrounding the colloid nexus.

If the party’s actions are in opposition to the colloid’s machinations, it will not aid those attempting to use the nexus and may employ the spherical attack to protect the nexus if assaulted. Note that the colloid is opposed to killing and will always warn targets to surrender via proxies, if possible.

Underworld Campsites

There are new rules here for setting up camp and sleeping, to make the environment in which you rest and the quality of sleep matter more. These rules don’t have to be the end of it, though! Particularly while exploring new and wondrous vistas, you may well wish to add a further sense of excitement to the procedures, and make sure that campsites are sufficiently different from each other. Table 13-1 represents an application of the rules, with sample campsites and features provided. The table can be used in conjunction with the units of stock rules if you want, or without them and just the descriptions.

The following table is intended to represent camping environments in a general Underworld context and can be seen as a guideline. Based on this table, it’s easy enough to create further camping tables for specific biomes, such as for a fungal jungle, a subterranean ocean, or another region, should you desire to do so. The Foraging and Hunting Tables can provide further inspiration.

Roll 2d20 two or three times. Once to establish the site, and once or twice to get descriptions of its features.

For an unexpected challenge, consider adding one of the minor hazard entries from Tables 12-1 through 12-4.

5The ground of this site is wildly disturbed earth. A small, random, but incongruous trinket is found.

Table 13-1: Underworld Campsite Location and Features
2d20 Site Features
2 This cavern’s eerie, looming fungi have tendril-like appendages moving in barely visible slow-motion. They impose a -2 resting penalty modifier if seen. Long beards of mold dangle from the roof, with bulbs of phosphorescent nectar hanging from them. Forego either the food or the water unit of stock requirement for this rest.
3 A damp, mossy cave. Its soft ground grants a +1 resting penalty modifier, but dampness reduces the duration of any campfire by -1 hour. Mole burrows litter the walls. They hum softly and provide a +1 resting penalty modifier or impose a -1 resting penalty modifier, based on a character’s reaction.
4 The site is just a wide ditch or crevasse; the party must sleep in a line, with little room to turn over. Any soil present is a strange color. Roll 1d6: 1. Violet, 2. Blue, 3. Silver, 4. Turquoise, 5. Yellow, 6. White; GMs can decide if any are useful.
6 The site is beside a pathway; this increases the chance of encountering creatures, which may or may not demand a toll. The cave sports a wide rocky outcropping that gives a good view across it and prevents regular encounters if a watch if placed at its edge and doesn’t fall asleep.
7 Stalactites and stalagmites form a strange, natural cathedral with somber, yet soothing acoustics that grant a +1 resting penalty modifier. However, if loud enemy forces are nearby, it imposes a -1 resting penalty modifier to sleep as the amplified sound is very disturbing physically and mentally. Harmless axolotls thrive here, marching in hypnotic patterns alongside the walls. The chance to fall asleep during watch increases to 3-in-10, requiring the burning of 3 Hit Dice to negate this chance. But if succumbed to, the pattern evokes deep, refreshing sleep and grants a +3 resting penalty modifier.
8 A clearing that is littered with fallen trunks and bare stumps of fungi that inflict a -1 resting penalty modifier due to their unhelpful positions. Several rings of toadstools. Fey or funglets are nearby, increasing the chance of meeting either, if the GM chooses.
9 A tunnel covered in phosphorescent, but horrible-smelling fungi that impose a -1 resting penalty modifier. Later attempts to track the characters are made with advantage until they have bathed. Nests of eyeless termites try to spoil 1d6 days’ worth of provisions or units of stock each night. A DC 15 Wisdom (Perception) or Intelligence (Nature) check notices their presence before they ruin the goods.
10 A cavern overgrown with bramble-like growths that impose a -1 resting penalty modifier. Natural cisterns hold enough water filtered through the rocks for 1d3+1 characters to slake their thirst. Forego the water unit of stock requirement for each drinker.
11 A cramped cave that offers enough space for only 1d4+1 Medium-sized creatures. A planar instability opens a gate to a different plane for five minutes at the same moment every day.
12 Sturdy creepers allow for sleeping hammock-style above ground. While not comfortable (-1 resting penalty modifier), their elevation negates the chance of random encounters with most entities. A constant, somehow oddly soothing rumble suffuses the space, granting a +1 resting penalty modifier but imposing disadvantage on Perception checks that rely on hearing, and halving a creature’s tremorsense.
13 A supernaturally flat and smooth cave. Its sinister appearance and “otherworldliness” imposes a -1 resting penalty modifier on most characters; if a GM wishes, sorcerers and warlocks with suitably alien sorcerous origins or patrons instead gain a +2 resting penalty modifier. A troupe of multi-hued, unnaturally fast slime molds flits around the place. If fed with 1d3 days’ worth of food, they begin generating a dance that duplicates a constant hypnotic pattern (DC 18). This covers the whole cave as the party rests, granting a +2 resting penalty modifier to it but hampering intruders.
14 Black obsidian sand covers the floor (+2 resting penalty modifier). Mysteriously, creatures that can dine on blood (such as ahoolings or vampires) can draw sustenance from the place, requiring no additional food for 24 hours. A jet-black, moth-shaped hole flies through the dark. In reality it is a legendary insect that allows any who look through it to see in a straight line to the limit of their field of vision, no matter what would normally block their view: stone, metal or any other obstacles.
15 This hidden but narrow ledge imposes a -1 resting penalty modifier due to the fear of rolling off it. The floor is littered with traces of other creatures that may or may not visit, live or hunt in the vicinity.
16 This soft, sand-filled depression grants a +1 resting penalty modifier. A weapon drenched in fresh blood is fully encased in a strange, ancient, translucent stalagmite.
17 This space, overgrown with mildly acidic rhizomes, imposes a -3 resting penalty modifier unless a character is resistant or immune to acid damage. A single, colossal mushroom stands tall and proud in the middle of the space. It may have special powers beyond smelling of their home to anyone who takes a deep breath beneath it.
18 This cave is daubed with strange ideograms and motifs. Eerie, vivid dreams enter sleep, granting a calm +2 resting penalty modifier (50%) or imposing a foul -2 resting penalty modifier (50%). A kneeling, crystalline statue of a humanoid remains here, in a pose that suggests partaking in food or water. If anything, it looks utterly at peace. This may indicate the presence of the Colloid nearby.
19 A barren area razed by fire. Sleep may be upset. A calming drone comes from a nest of blind hornets.
20 This preternaturally arid tube has flumes directing hot winds through it. Infections inflicted by slimes and molds are cured after a long rest, but the water consumption to prevent thirst is doubled. The cave has natural salt deposits that are frequented by local animals. This increases the chance of a random encounter. The salt may or may not be of use for an alchemist or spellcaster.
21 This long and barren tunnel warps light. Whatever means of seeing is employed, the distance to notice approaching beings is doubled and checks to do so are made at advantage. Anything heading toward the party’s camp site encounters the same effect. A flammable gas, otherwise harmless, heats slowly over an hour, but then ignites suddenly as if an 8d6 fireball has exploded. A DC 10 Wisdom (Survival) or Intelligence (Nature) check senses it is present and the need to forego open flames when camping here.
22 While a recently-dug purple worm’s tunnel is bereft of other creatures, it does entail the risk of its creator returning to see if it has caught a meal (15% chance). A halfling’s petrified skeleton has been unearthed by a recent rockslide. It asks politely to be dug free. It is actually a dødelig.
23 This noisome, bog-like cave imposes a -1 resting penalty modifier. Without a way to ward off bugs, this becomes a -3 resting penalty modifier. Gnarly rhizomes endlessly twitch, extending fronded tendrils like alien tentacles grasping in slow motion. The effect imposes a -2 resting penalty modifier.
24 A low-ceilinged cave. Small-sized characters gain a +1 resting penalty modifier, but Medium-sized characters suffer a -1 resting penalty modifier. Plants sown here grow roughly 1d6 feet over night, and then become ambulatory, but not sentient. They just slowly wander off in a random direction.
25 Fluorescent ferns grow in this small cave, negating the need for a light source. The ferns are edible, allowing 1d6+1 characters to stave off starvation. Their glow penetrates the skin until digested. A ditch along one side of this cave contains shattered bones, carapaces and the like. It is a dumping ground for the grisly remains of the victims of some clearly thriving predator. Its wet spoors are in the ditch too.
26 A beautiful, crystalline version of a small fungus-copse grants peace, calm, and a +4 resting penalty modifier within the cave, but imposes the risk of incurring Colloid Melancholia. Several beasts lie here, neatly flayed and bloodless. The sight imposes a -4 resting penalty modifier, and this may be a place visited by Gholaad, the Wind of Wasting (Occult Secrets of the Underworld).
27 This cave’s dome has safe ledges but climbing up requires a DC 15 Strength (Athletics) check. The party is hard to see on them, granting a +1 resting penalty modifier, safety, and a good ambush spot. An overlap with the unstable Amber Roads allows for the mining of amber to make amber sticks—enough amber for 2d10+5 amber sticks may be gathered.
28 This cavern holds a partially collapsed structure of a once-powerful race. It might make a safe base. A beast’s broken and bloodied fang lies on the floor. It is 15 inches long and stiletto-deadly at its point.
29 This cave is littered with countless sharp stone barbs, imposing a -2 resting penalty modifier. Phosphorescent growths make it possible to forego resources to provide light. If picked, they fade swiftly.
30 A huge, hollow war-machine or iron statue lies torn apart, seamlessly integrating into the tunnel and granting additional metallic protection. An injured, riderless svirf slug mews pitifully. Healing, feeding and returning it may lead to the rider rewarding the party.
31 A cave with a fungus-shrouded pool that feels like an oasis and grants a +2 resting penalty modifier. Rat burrows, along with their detritus, litter this place; resting here may risk exposure to disease and the chance of attack.
32 Myriad molds and fungi fill this cave. There is a 25% chance each night they bloom and form clouds of spores too beautiful to behold. It grants a +3 resting penalty modifier but also requires a DC 15 Constitution saving throw to be made. On a success, a character can marvel at the wondrous display; on a failure, they take 7 (2d6) poison damage and are poisoned until they can bathe. A subsequent allergic reaction imposes a -2 resting penalty modifier. An elf-sized cocoon hangs in the middle of the cave. It has a 50% chance to hold the corpse of a delver (1d3 days’ provisions or units of stock left) or a cluster of spiders; they are harmless and delicious if roasted. If eaten, eliminate the need to consume food for the night. There is a 50% chance that cooking them attracts a creature, such as the fully-grown parent or another predator. If intelligent enough, the predator trades a unit of stock for 1d4+1 spiders.
33 This steep incline has winds blowing from above. This disperses insects and brings fresh air, but also threatens to blow away lightweights. Characters that weigh 150 pounds or more gain a +2 resting penalty modifier, while those that weigh less suffer a -1 resting penalty modifier. This cave’s floor slowly rises and falls. In fact, it is the back of a gargantuan subterranean kiwi-bird, torpidly dreaming the eons away. Its soft feathers grant a +4 resting penalty modifier; the place is snug without using further provisions. Fire may wake the dreamer before its time, leading to disastrous consequences.
34 Chipped dragon’s teeth move randomly in and out of this black-veined cave’s floor. There is a 75% chance they impose a -2 resting penalty modifier. A strange stone face is set into the walls. It may be natural or supernatural. Subject to GM’s approval, it might utter cryptic clues and/or prophecies.
35 A slick, muddy floor reduces campfire duration by -2 hours and imposes -1 resting penalty modifier. An interesting but out-of-place stone stands here. If split open, the intestines of a humanoid are apparent.
36 This supernaturally cold dead-end houses restless spirits, imposing a -2 resting penalty modifier if a campfire is set, but a -4 resting penalty modifier if heat is foregone. If the space is consecrated and blessed properly, characters resting here get a one-time +4 resting penalty modifier instead. Eyeless white crickets with instrument-like shapes on them live here. If fed a day’s worth of food, they chirp like a bucolic ensemble that by itself grants the boons of a +2 resting penalty modifier and they raise the mood via Camaraderie. If not fed, the noise just grates, imposing a -2 resting penalty modifier.
37 This spherical cave means characters roll together slowly when asleep. Sleep is only 50% effective. Natural depressions are used to hold blood. Buoys of inflated, sealed hearts keep them from coagulating.
38 White gypsum sand covers the cave, granting a +3 resting penalty modifier but adding 4 hours sleep. A red-eyed, two-tailed, jet squirrel with razor-sharp fangs sits watching the party. Then another appears, just as the first vanishes.
39 This cavern is crisscrossed with petrified roots that impose a -1 resting penalty modifier. Strange totems made of bone, sinew and viscera hint of the presence of a nearby primitive tribe.
40 This compact, serene, almost deific cavern houses a small pool of fresh water, much edible lichen, and numerous harmless fluorescent fungi. A stop here grants a +4 resting penalty modifier due to the calm. In addition, the cavern can provide light, food and water for 1d6+1 characters. After that, it requires a month to replenish its resources. A patch of springy, fluffy moss is big enough for 1d3 Small-sized characters to rest on; on a roll of 2 or 3, a Medium-sized character can sleep on it instead. Any user gets a +4 resting penalty modifier for doing so. But as the moss looks so inviting, those relaxing on it raise rancor and discord during the next rest, which imposes a -2 resting penalty modifier on everyone.
Table 14-1: Universal Foraging Table
d10 Possible Major Complication
1 Ambush. A group of predators, bandits or monsters follows the party and decides to strike.
2 Hopelessly Lost. The party is lost. For rules on getting lost, see Getting Lost, page 80. Unusually, the party is lost for at least 1d8 days.
3 Corrupting Exposure. The party is exposed to one of the various strange things “out there” OR the party is exposed to a hazard of the terrain.
4 Magic Land. Strange magics have warped this region. They fascinate 1d3 random party members, slowing everyone’s progress.
5 Awakened Threat. A powerful horror or beast is crossed or awakened and may stalk the party.
6 Painful Injury. A broken leg, a crushed hand or the like hamper a random party member. Healing magic and Wisdom (Medicine) are required during the night to treat the injury.
7 Competition. Someone or something else is tracking the Target! 8 Not Even One More Step. Whatever the reason, it is a truly grueling trek. All party members must make camp and consume double rations (or units of stock) OR a single character just eats quadruple rations, which may lead to discord when camping.
9 Crashing the Cabal. The party happens upon a faction or group of creatures engaged in a conspiracy, mating or similar activities, at which it doesn’t want any witnesses. However, the cabal invites the party to be part of its activity in a persuasive manner.
10 Supplies Destroyed. Robbed in the night, brutal mishap or the like. Lose 1d10 days’ worth of units of stock or provisions for 1d6 characters.
d10 Possible Minor Complication
1 Lost Supplies. The party loses 1d6 units of stock. At the GM’s discretion, there may be evidence of whom or what took the stock. If there is evidence, there is a 20% chance it leads to another minor complication.
2 Sleepless Night. There is a party-wide additional -1d4 resting penalty modifier during the next night. At the GM’s discretion, this may worsen the party’s mood so much it secretly diminishes the next use of Camaraderie.
3 Hostile Encounter. Local fauna or monsters attack. Roll for random encounters. However, there is a 5% chance the attack is in error and can be resolved after 2d2 rounds of combat with an offer of an appropriate number (GM’s discretion) of units of stock or other consumables. 4 Diseased Area. Whether an offal pit or a rank quagmire, the area is dangerous to traverse. It can be avoided, but one Foraging Success is lost when doing so. Braving the area results in potential exposure to the hazard.
5 Painful Terrain. Acidic fumes, razor-sharp stones or similar obstacles are painful to traverse. The problem can be avoided, but one Foraging Success is lost when doing so. Braving the area results in 5 (2d4) damage of the appropriate type.
6 Unfriendly Creatures. Threatening creatures or unfriendly intelligent beings inhabit the area. Combat may result unless either trade, parley or other negotiation that diffuses the situation is entered into.
7 Strenuous Terrain. The terrain traversed is particularly exhausting. The party may decide to take it slowly, requiring two days to traverse the region, accruing no Foraging Successes, or consume one additional unit of stock or provision per character to gain 2 Foraging Successes.
8 Lost. For rules on getting lost, see Getting Lost, page 80. Unlike what happens usually, the party is lost for at least 1d6 days.
9 Infestation. The party is infested with vermin, mold, or similar threats that may manifest as diseases, poisons, or 1d3 destroyed units of stock.
10 Lost Item. The party loses one minor item, such as a potion or similar. It may be retrieved by either losing one Foraging Success, or by later successfully Retracing the Path.
d10 Possible Reprieve
1 Shelter. A remote cabin, cavern or outpost provides roof over the characters’ heads. The GM determines the quality of rest and units of stock both present and consumed, but the overall effect of staying there is beneficial.
2 Hidden Cache. The party finds a hidden cache of units of stock or 1d2 other consumables. Taking them may result in their owner tracking the party.
3 Caught the Trail. The party gains an unexpected additional Foraging Success. At the GM’s discretion, the surprise find may bolster the party’s mood so much it secretly enhances the next use of Camaraderie.
4 Friendly Explorers. The party meets a group that offers to trade information, supplies and guard each other.
5 Spring of Life. A bubbling spring infused with strange properties is found.
6 Onwards. Any wildlife or monster seems to ignore the party despite passing within feet of at least one member. The party experiences no random encounters for 1d4 hours.
7 Mysterious Guide. A stranger offers to guide the party—for a price. Paying the price will provide 1d6 additional Foraging Successes.
8 Weird Rocks. A strange rock formation infused with beneficial properties is found. 9 Wealth of Targets. This has no immediate effect, but when the party finds the Target, the quantity available is doubled. This can only happen once per foraging. Reroll subsequent results.
10 Perfect Resting Place. The party happens upon the perfect resting place—it either does not consume units of stock or it ignores all negative resting penalty modifiers when setting up camp, but only for one night.
Table 14-2: Foraging Near Civilization/Trade Routes
d10 Possible Major Complication
1 Illegal. The Target is a controlled substance, unbeknown to the party. Alternatively, a major trading center or species has just declared the Target to be illegal.
2 Other Scavengers. Other scavengers, such as a beggar king’s troops or a hostile group, have the same Target as the party. If rolled towards the end of the foraging attempt, consider having the Target already picked and making its retrieval possible only via tracking or questing for it.
3 Disgusting Exposure. The party finds itself searching in an unsanitary environment, e.g. an offal pit, sewerage system, or other foul surroundings. The party is exposed to a disease and potentially some filth-related monsters or entities. If rolled towards the end of the foraging attempt, consider placing the Target in a particularly toxic environment. This complication may not be avoided.
4 Ambush. A group of predators, bandits or scavengers follows the party and decides to strike. Alternatively, consider that the Target may be bait left by certain groups, who have prepared an ambush for any seekers.
5 Guard Intervention. The guards of a nearby body of authority or well-connected caravan interfere with the party’s foraging attempt. This may just delay the party, or possibly cost it at least one Foraging Success.
6 Whisper Campaign. Someone just could not keep their mouth shut. A neighborhood, caravan or similar, sizable group becomes aware of the party’s goals and the vicinity of the Target and may help or hinder.
7 Bad Counteroffer. A hostile individual tries to coerce the party to hand the Target to them instead, on threat of consequences for failing to do so. This is no bluff on the coercer’s part, and things soon get ugly.
8 Not Even One More Step. Whatever the reason, it has been a truly grueling trek. All party members must make camp, find shelter, and consume double rations (or units of stock) OR a single character must consume quadruple rations without asking the others, but this may lead to discord when camping.
9 Illegal Activities. The party happens upon a group of creatures engaged in some sort of illegal activity. The creatures may not want witnesses but are as willing to buy off the party members as kill them.
10 Supplies Destroyed. The party is robbed in the night, suffers a brutal mishap, or the like. Lose 2d10 days’ worth of units of stock or provisions for all characters.
d10 Possible Minor Complication
1 Stolen Supplies. The party loses 1d4 units of stock. At the GM’s discretion, there may be evidence of whom or what took the stock. If there is evidence, there is a 20% chance it leads to another minor complication.
2 Annoying Noise. A lusty celebration, drunken revel, or rowdy nearby inn makes sleeping hard. If not dealt with, each imposes an additional -1d3 resting penalty modifier during the next night (i.e. a drunken celebration at a rowdy nearby inn imposes a -3d3 resting penalty modifier) 3 Parasites. The party is exposed to a parasite common to the region; if a previous complication involved individuals from another biome, the parasites may stem from this source instead and be surprisingly exotic.
4 Dangerous Area. The trail leads through a potentially hostile group’s checkpoint or turf. The dangerous area may be avoided but doing so entails the loss of a Foraging Success.
5 Polluted Area. The route that needs to be traversed has been polluted by alchemical ingredients, a plague-ridden mass-grave or similar issues. Braving this foul space results in exposure to a disease and/or 5 (2d4) damage of a suitable type. The perilous area may be avoided, but this entails the loss of a Foraging Success.
6 Sketchy Individuals. Unfriendly intelligent beings inhabit the area and demand a toll. Combat may result, but successful Intimidation could end it.
7 Embargo. A local political ruckus, activists or bandits block the trail. The party can attempt to use Charisma (Persuasion) or Charisma (Deception) to attempt to display sympathy, or pay off the individuals, or, they can attempt to bypass the embargo/blockage, but doing so entails the loss of a Foraging Success.
8 Strenuous Terrain. The terrain traversed is particularly exhausting. The party may decide to cross it slowly, requiring two days to traverse the region, accruing no Foraging Successes, or consume one additional unit of stock or provision per character to gain 2 Foraging Successes.
9 Infestation. The party is infested with vermin, mold, or similar threats that may manifest as diseases, poisons, or 1d3 destroyed units of stock.
10 Thieving Attempt. The party catches a thief in the act of trying to steal one minor item, such as a potion or the like. Combat may ensue, the item may be retrieved by trailing the thief, or the thief may join the characters at the request of either the thief or party itself.
d10 Possible Reprieve
1 Inebriated Stranger. A stranger under the influence of some sort of drug mistakes the party for friends. The stranger provides 1d3 units of stock.
2 Smuggler’s Cache. The party finds a hidden cache of illegal or common magical goods. Taking them may result in their owner tracking the party, unless the characters cover their trail very well.
3 Caught the Trail. The party gains an additional Foraging Success. 4 Friendly Faces. The party meets several friendly folk who offer to help the characters with some local issues. The party can call upon these beings to e.g. bypass an embargo or similar minor complication.
5 The King Knows. A beggar’s king, the master of a caravanserai or similar local individual hears of the group and lends their services indirectly. The party gains 1d3 additional Foraging Successes, or 2d6 additional Foraging Successes if they agree to perform a task for the entity in the future.
6 Under My Protection. The party is mistaken for being agents of some powerful being. No random encounters take place for 8d12 hours.
7 Shady Guide. A stranger offers to guide the party—for a price. Paying the price will provide 1d6 additional Foraging Successes. There is a 33% chance that the guide is a fraud who attempts to lure the party into a minor complication. If this is the case, reroll a reprieve once the minor complication is resolved.
8 Abandoned Trade Goods. A caravan seems to have abandoned its trade goods. Gain 1d6 units of stock.
9 Secondary Target. This has no immediate effect, but when the party finds the Target, the quantity available is doubled. This can only happen once per foraging; if an earlier complication indicated the Target was harvested previously, this entry means that there is a second, moderately well-hidden Target somewhere in the original Target’s area. Reroll subsequent results.
10 Abandoned Campsite. The party happens upon a resting place, such as a tent with bedrolls and the like. While no food is present, this satisfies the comfort/light cost in units of stock when camping here.
Table 14-3: Colloid Foraging
d10 Possible Major Complication
1 Merciful Infusion. Every party member must succeed on a Charisma saving throw against the moderate environmental hazard DC (Underworld Hazards), gaining the colliatur’s Sacred Life feature until they finish a long rest on a failure. If an affected character is already inflicted with Colloid Melancholia, the condition severity increases by one level. Every instance of a character violating the no-kill stipulation in the party imposes a cumulative -1 resting penalty modifier on the entire party at its next rest.
2 Undead Hunters. A hunting party of colliatur is scouring the area for undead. They may demand help with this task, or attack if the group contains undead or undead-creating entities (such as a dødelig or an obvious death god cleric or necromancer). The colliatur swap 1d4 units of stock for useful information on the whereabouts of undead. They hunt down anyone who lies to them or sends them into a trap. There is a 10% chance the hunting colliatur find the party at the worst possible moment rather than when the characters are otherwise undistracted.
3 Phantoms of the Lost. The party is haunted by visions of lost loved ones. Spellcasters must succeed on a DC 10 Constitution check to cast spells. Consuming a drug that sharpens awareness cancels this effect, but the user requires 2d3 extra hours of sleep at the next rest.
4 So Beautiful, It Hurts. The characters happen upon a serene, crystalline structure infused with veins of pure peace and bliss. The party may choose to rest, canceling all resting penalty modifiers they may suffer from and requiring only 2 units of stock per character, but doing so costs them 1d4 Foraging Successes.
5 An Awareness Stirs. Add +5 to the Colloid Awareness modifier.
6 Involuntary Teleport. The party stumbles into a colloid teleportation matrix crystal, teleporting them either towards (50%) or away from (50%) the Target. The party gains or loses 1d20 Foraging Successes, depending on whether they moved towards or away from the Target.
7 Take the Pain Away. Phantoms in the crystal promise to take the pain away. If the party makes camp, they lose 1d4 Foraging Successes, but gain advantage on either Strength, Dexterity or Constitution saving throws, as determined by the GM. This lasts until the party finishes a long rest. If an affected character already suffers from Colloid Melancholia, they increase the condition severity by one level.
8 Resonance. Strange harmonics prevent the use of Camaraderie. Attempts to do so instead result in discord. This lasts for 1d3 attempts to camp. Finding and hiring a local bard has a 50% chance of counteracting this.
9 Call of the Colloid. Treat the day spent as 1d6 days instead to determine the onset of Colloid Melancholia.
10 Not Even One More Step. Whatever the reason, the day’s travel has been a truly grueling trek. All party members must make camp, find shelter and consume double rations (or units of stock) OR a single character must consume quadruple rations. This may lead to discord (GM’s discretion) either when camping (40% chance), 1d3+1 hours into the next day’s travel (40% chance) or after the next fight, whenever it may take place (20% chance).

When playing with the wilderness rules presented in this site, note that the colloid tends to be relatively well-lit. Providing the climate is moderate and the party has bedrolls and agreeable means of resting, they do not need to pay a unit of stock for comfort while exploring the colloid.

d10 Possible Minor Complication
1 Lesser Call of the Colloid. Treat each day spent in the colloid from here on out as 1d3 days instead to determine the onset of Colloid Melancholia.
2 Haunting Calls. Long-dead friends call to the party. The imploring moans impose a -2 resting penalty modifier. 3 Sudden Bout of Mercy. Once during the next day, a character must succeed on a DC 15 Charisma saving throw when about to kill another living being. Failure to do so makes the character hesitate and reduces the number of days before the onset of Colloid Melancholia by 1d4. If the character already suffers from Colloid Melancholia, they instead increase their condition severity level by 1 on a failed saving throw.
4 Sharp Crystals. The trail leads through a grueling area of glowing, caltrop-like crystals. Crossing these deals slashing, piercing or radiant damage to all characters equal to the moderate environmental hazard damage entry (Underworld Hazards). Avoiding the perilous area entails the loss of a Foraging Success.
5 Colloid Infection. 2d6 units of stock representing the party’s water is infected by the colloid. Drinking the water counts as exposure to Colloid Melancholia.
6 Undead in Peril. A mighty undead creature, one that is usually hostile towards the living, appears before the characters ragged and half-destroyed, begging them to escort it out of “this crystalline hellscape!” 7 Can We Talk to You About “The Colloid”? A colliatur Messiah and its entourage want to talk to the party about their violent tendencies and their needless bloodshed. They do not take “no” for an answer.
8 Infestation Foiled. Lice, bugs, and similar pests infesting the characters are crystallized by the colloid. This rids them of the infestation, but also exposes them to the colloid, reducing the amount of days before they suffer Colloid Melancholia by 1d6.
9 One Final Gift. A character gifts a random, minor item to one of the phantoms resembling an old friend or loved one from the colloid. The item is irrevocably lost, but at the GM’s discretion, the character may receive a return gift in the form of insight or inspiration at some point over the next 1d4 days.
10 Strenuous Colloid Terrain. The region the characters are traversing is especially tiring. They may decide to go slowly, taking two days to cross it and accruing no Foraging Successes, or consume 1 additional unit of stock or provision per character to gain 2 Foraging Successes. If they listen, the colloid phantoms tell how to bypass the difficulty. This reduces their amount of days before suffering Colloid Melancholia by 1d8.
d10 Possible Reprieve
1 Nexus Knot. The party happens upon a nexus knot of the colloid, a powerful source of magical energy that may be used to emit massive blasts of destructive force. A friendly colloid phantom allows the party to fully control the nexus knot (Underworld Hazards).
2 Gift from Beyond. One of the colloid phantoms, its beloved still among the non-transcended, leaves a gift for it. The party gains a minor item, subject to the GM’s discretion.
3 Desperate Undead. A mighty undead creature, frozen in place by the colloid, is close to being annihilated. It promises all its worldly riches to be saved, and it is so desperate, it may actually stick to the bargain.
4 The Titan Slumbers. The Colloid Awareness modifier decreases by 1d4.
5 Under My Protection. Colloid crystals have grown on the party’s weaponry. Until they finish a long rest, the characters inflict an additional +1d4 radiant damage with their weapon attacks.
6 Holy of Holies. The next area the party makes camp in is treated as consecrated ground, and units of stock may be used as holy water until the party next finishes a long rest.
7 Caught the Trail. The party gains an additional Foraging Success. 8 Secret from Beyond. The party runs into the phantom of a beaten creature. It reveals a secret only it knew. The secret may energize (10%), help (50%), hinder (20%), haunt (15%) or imperil (5%) each character on an individual basis.
9 Colloid Utopia. The party happens upon the perfect resting place; it either does not consume units of stock or can ignore all negative resting penalty modifiers after setting up camp. Also, any reduction to maximum hit points incurred from undead, such as a vampire’s Blood Drain or ongoing necrotic damage, are negated.
10 Colloid Duplication. The colloid has duplicated the Target 1d4 times. The additional Targets may be plucked, but for each one plucked, the character plucking it must agree to a brief mental contact, which bestows one level of Colloid Melancholia (no save).

When playing with the wilderness rules presented in this site, note that the fungal jungle is an extraordinarily rich biome. At the GM’s discretion, consider foregoing the need to spend units of stock for food. In markedly humid regions with plenty of fresh water unspoiled by spores and rhizomes, also reduce the need to spend units of stock for water. It is suggested instead to use of the numerous tables of weird magical effects to account for the results of drinking and eating magical fungi.

Table 14-4: Fungal Jungle Foraging
d10 Possible Major Complication
1 Shroomitis! The party is affected by a concentrated spore cloud that reacts violently with its members’ physiologies. This requires a Constitution saving throw against a moderate environmental hazard DC (Underworld Hazards). On a failure, a character increases the condition severity of Shroomitis by +1.
2 Psychedelic Dreams of Narcosa. The characters are hit by a concentrated blooming of psychotropic spores that make them believe they are somewhere else. (Note to GMs: Got that one adventure that won’t fit the tone of your campaign? Need a change of pace? This is your chance to insert that oddball escapade!) 3 Hay Fever. Endless exposure to vast clouds of irritating spores leads one character to suffer a violent allergic reaction. A random character must succeed on a Constitution saving throw against a severe environmental hazard DC (Underworld Hazards). On a failure, they suffer severe environmental hazard damage (Underworld Hazards), with damage determined by the allergic reaction, spores, and character. Acid, poison and necrotic damage make the most sense.
4 The Densest Haze. The party strays into a super-dense haze of spores, so heavy it can cause dust explosions if met with open flame. The party senses this with a Wisdom (Survival) or Intelligence (Nature) check against a moderate environmental hazard DC (Underworld Hazards). On a failure, the whole cloud ignites, causing severe environmental hazard (Underworld Hazards) fire damage to all within the blast. A Dexterity saving throw against the moderate environmental hazard save DC halves the damage incurred. 5 Temporal Distortion. The spores, their drone-song telling of mystic, ages-transcending rhyzalla, distort time itself. Until the party finishes a long rest, every member must make a successful Wisdom saving throw at the start of each combat, with a moderate environmental hazard DC (Underworld Hazards). On a failure, they are affected as if by a slow spell that cannot be dispelled for 1 minute. This is canceled by the benevolent temporal distortion reprieve.
6 Fungal Teleport. The party stumbles into a volatile fungus that dismantles their bodily structure and rebuilds them elsewhere in the rhizome, seemingly teleporting them to the new point. This is false. The “teleported” characters are in fact fungal clones. Unbeknown to the players, the original party very much remains alive but is unconscious for a day. Let the players play the fungal clones until they reach the Target, then have the original party show up. Now revert control of the original party. The fungal clones are 100% like the normal characters but turn hostile towards their duplicates; there can be only one. If an original character dies, their duplicate fungal clone instantly helps the original party against the other clones. Does the group take a fungal clone on board?
7 It Tastes Just Like…! The characters find a massive, bulbous fungus that smells to each of them like their favorite, long-missed food. Delicious and irresistible, it can yield the equivalent of 6 units of stock that can only be used for food or water. Consuming a dose of this mushroom makes the characters sluggish and constipated. Every day they consume a unit of stock sourced from the mushroom, they lose one Foraging Success. 8 Not Even One More Step. Whatever the reason, the day’s travel has been a truly grueling trek. All party members must make camp, find shelter and consume double rations (or units of stock) OR a single character must consume quadruple rations. This may lead to discord (GM’s discretion) either when camping (40% chance), 1d3+1 hours into the next day’s travel (40% chance) or 2 rounds into the next fight (20% chance).
9 Mellow Aura. Calming colors and dim phosphorescence enhance the use of Camaraderie. Attempts to do so improve the mood by an additional step, but a character’s efforts also result in fits of giggling and laughter, increasing the chance of random encounters. This also imposes disadvantage on Dexterity (Stealth) checks to move silently. The fits of giggling last for 1d3 attempts to set up camp.
10 Shroom Caretakers. The party is considered to be intruders by the psilocybists or spore-cerers that rule the region. Tribute or persuasive reasons need to be given for these rulers to allow the party to progress.
d10 Possible Minor Complication
1 Minor Shroomitis. The party is hit by a potent burst of spores that react harshly with its members’ physiologies. This requires a Constitution saving throw against a minor environmental hazard DC (Underworld Hazards). On a failure, a character increases the condition severity of Shroomitis by +1.
2 Spitting Shrooms. The trail leads through a horribly dangerous area of volatile spores. Crossing it deals acid, poison or necrotic damage to all characters equal to the moderate environmental hazard damage entry (Underworld Hazards). Avoiding the area entails the loss of a Foraging Success.
3 Infested Magic. Spellcasters have their minds infested with spores of magical fungi. As they cast their next 1d6 spells, they must succeed on a Constitution saving throw against a minor environmental hazard DC (Underworld Hazards) or suffer the effects of either a confusion spell or gain the hallucinating condition (see below) for 1 round.
4 Fungal Mindshift. Spores convince random characters that they are plant beings, making them: behave as if only magic affecting plants can affect them; believe that they must bury their feet to rest; accept only liquefied food. The delusion is short-lived, but imposes a -2 resting penalty modifier on the party and may result in discord.
5 Strenuous Shroom Terrain. The terrain traversed is particularly exhausting. The party may decide to take it slow, requiring two days to traverse the region, accruing no Foraging Successes, or consume one additional unit of stock or provision per character to gain 2 Foraging Successes. Alternatively, each character may choose to take an energizing drug and forge a new path across the terrain, but doing so obviously exposes the party to the narcotic.
6 Fungal Corrosion. One random, minor item is irrevocably corroded or consumed by exposure to the fungi.
7 Biting Insects. The annoying insects infecting the region impose a -3 resting penalty modifier.
8 Shroomitis Victim. Someone infected by Shroomitis staggers towards the party. Possibly mad, psychotic or just desperate, they need to get out of the jungle.
9 Dreamlike Haze. Multi-hued clouds of disorienting spores make navigation hard. The party must succeed on a Wisdom (Survival) check against a minor environmental hazard DC (Underworld Hazards). On a failure, the characters become lost for 1d4 days (Getting Lost, page 80).
10 Fungal Corruption. 2d6 units of stock representing the party’s food are infected by the spores. Eating the food counts as exposure to Shroomitis or to another poison or disease, subject to the GM’s discretion.
d10 Possible Reprieve
1 Yummy Shrooms. The party finds particularly tasty edible mushrooms. This grants them 1d6 units of stock that must be used to sate hunger. If every character eats one of the delicious mushrooms, the party mood improves by an additional step (Camaraderie, page 90).
2 Fungal Fountain. The party finds a cluster of benevolent magical mushrooms (GM’s choice of boon).
3 Time Bent Benevolently. The characters act in line with rhyzalla’s wishes, following the inscrutable agenda of the time-spanning rhizome; at the start of the next 1d6 combats, they have a 50% chance of being subjected to the effects of a haste spell that can’t be dispelled.
4 More Virulent Than Expected. One dose of acid or poison the party has in its possession is infected with rhizomes that enhance its potency. The saving throw made against the substance is made at disadvantage.
5 Something’s Sprouting on my Weapons! Fungi grow on the party’s weapons. Until they finish a long rest, each character inflicts an additional +1d4 acid or poison (subject to GM’s discretion) damage with weapon attacks.
6 More Widespread Than Expected. One dose of acid or poison the party has is infected with rhizomes that enhance its area of effect. The saving throw against the substance is made by everybody in a 10-foot radius.
7 Fungal Oasis. The party finds the perfect fungal resting place: fluorescence; a warm, soft floor; fresh water; and edible mushrooms, all at once! The party doesn’t need to consume any units of stock and ignores any negative resting penalty modifiers, but only for one night. The oasis requires 1d10 days to replenish its resources.
8 At Least Those Are Medicine. The party loses 1d6 units of stock, as mushrooms grow from them. However, the mushrooms act as a potion of healing. One potion is gained per unit of stock destroyed this way.
9 Caught the Trail. The party gains an additional Foraging Success. At the GM’s discretion, this may bolster the party’s mood so much it secretly enhances the next use of Camaraderie.
10 Warm, Mossy Bed. The party happens upon a fungal glade with a soft floor and edible mushrooms. The party doesn’t need to spend units of stock for comfort or food, but only for a single night. The glade takes 1d4 days to replenish its resources.

Hallucinating

A hallucinating creature can’t concentrate, has a passive Perception of 0, and has disadvantage on Intelligence, Wisdom, and Charisma checks.

The GM determines exactly what the creature sees, hears, and feels, as well as any additional conditions the creature might suffer while hallucinating. Table 14-5 provides some ideas.

Table 14-5: Hallucinations
d6 You see…
1 You’re sinking into quicksand!
2 You’re being swarmed by tiny spiders!
3 An item you’re holding turns into a viper!
4 The air is suffering as you breath it!
5 You’ve shrunk to the size of an acorn!
6 Gravity has reversed! Hold on!

It is straightforward to devise custom hunting tables for a specific biome, and there is some intended overlap with those tables presented for foraging. These are general tables suitable for hunts in any Underworld environment. As with foraging, each biome has major and minor complications listed, and then various possible reprieves.

Table 14-6: Universal Hunting Table
d10 Possible Major Complication
1 Ambush. A group of predators, bandits or monsters follows the party and decides to strike—or, perhaps a Quarry decides to turn the tables on the hunters! 2 Hopelessly Lost. The party is lost. Unlike the usual state of affairs, the party is lost for at least 1d8 days.
3 Corrupting Exposure. The party is exposed to one of the many strange things “out there”, such as a hazard of the terrain the hunt takes place in. Alternatively, party members begin to look like creatures they have recently killed, leading to effects similar to those of a confusion spell.
4 Magic Land. Strange magics have warped this region so there is a wild element to its use. This element can be a GM’s decision, but the sorcerer’s Wild Magic Surge table is a good place to start.
5 Awakened Threat. A powerful horror or beast is angered or awakened and may stalk the party, hunting them with as a Quarry! 6 Painful Injury. A broken leg, a crushed hand or the like hamper a random adventurer. Healing magic and Wisdom (Medicine) are required during the night to treat the injury, or else the condition takes twice the effort to cure.
7 Competition. Someone or something else is tracking the Quarry! This creature may switch its attention to the party.
8 Not Even One More Step. Whatever the reason, the party’s journey is a truly grueling trek. All party members must make camp and consume double rations (or units of stock) OR a single character must consume quadruple rations, but this may lead to discord when camping.
9 Crashing the Cabal. The party happens upon a group or group of creatures engaged in a conspiracy, mating or similar activities in which they don’t want any witnesses. However, the cabal invites the party to be part of its activity in a persuasive manner.
10 Supplies Destroyed. Robbed in the night, brutal mishap or the like. Lose 1d10 days’ worth of units of stock or provisions for 1d6 characters.
d10 Possible Minor Complication
1 Lost Supplies. Party loses 1d6 units of stock.
2 Sleepless Night. Additional -1d4 resting penalty modifier during the next night.
3 Hostile Encounter. Local fauna or monsters attack. Roll for random encounters.
4 Diseased Area. Whether an offal pit or foul quagmire, the area is dangerous to cross. It can be avoided, but one Hunting Success is lost when doing so. Braving the area results in potential exposure to the hazard. If unaware, the Quarry gains a Wisdom (Perception) check to notice it is being hunted.
5 Painful Terrain. Acidic fumes, razor-sharp stones or similar are painful to cross. It can be avoided, but one Hunting Success is lost when doing so. Braving the area results in 5 (2d4) damage of the appropriate type.
6 Unfriendly Creatures. Threatening beasts or unfriendly intelligent beings live here. Combat may result, but successful intimidation could end it.
7 Strenuous Terrain. The terrain traversed is particularly exhausting. The party may decide to take it slow, requiring two days to cross the region, accruing no Hunting Successes, or consume one additional unit of stock or provision per character to gain 2 Hunting Successes.
8 Lost. The party is lost for at least 1d6 days.
9 Infestation. The party is infested with vermin, mold, or similar threats that may manifest as diseases, poisons, or 1d3 destroyed units of stock.
10 Lost Item. The party loses one minor item, such as a potion or the like. It may be retrieved by either losing one Hunting Success, or by later successfully Retracing the Path.
d10 Possible Reprieve
1 Shelter. A remote cabin, cavern or outpost provides roof over the characters’ heads. The GM determines the quality of rest and units of stock present, as well as the number the party consumes.
2 Hidden Cache. The party finds a hidden cache of units of stock or 1d2 other consumables. Taking them may result in their owner tracking the party.
3 Caught the Trail. The party gains an additional Hunting Success. At the GM’s discretion, this may bolster the party’s mood so much it secretly enhances the next use of Camaraderie.
4 Friendly Explorers. The party meets a group of friendly explorers that offers to trade information, supplies and guard each other.
5 Fumble. The Quarry has either hurt itself or encountered a complication that hampers its abilities to evade capture. Subject to the GM’s discretion, this cancels one random bonus the Quarry has from Table 8-5: Quarry Capabilities. If you’re not playing with them, instead grant the party 1d6 Hunting Successes.
6 Onwards. Any wildlife or monster seems to ignore the characters. The party does not have any random encounters. The same usually does not hold true for the Quarry—unless it is an apex predator in its current biome (subject to GM discretion), the hunting party also gains 1d3 Hunting Successes.
7 Mysterious Guide. A stranger offers to guide the party—for a price…Paying the price will provide 1d6 additional Hunting Successes.
8 Weird Rocks. A strange rock formation infused with beneficial properties is found. The list for a wand of wonder is a helpful guide.
9 Quarries Have Bad Days, too. The Quarry makes a series of bad decisions and loses ground. The party gains 1d4 Hunting Successes.
10 Perfect Resting Place. The party happens upon the perfect resting place. Either it does not consume units of stock or it ignores all negative resting penalty modifiers when setting up camp, but only for one night.
Table 14-7: Hunting Near Civilization/Trade Routes
d10 Possible Major Complication
1 Protected Status. The Quarry crosses a region inhabited by beings that consider it to be sacred or worthy of protection. Ranging from environmentalists and scholars to primitive tribes, the inhabitants have a staunch belief in defending the Quarry and attempt to hamper the party at best, and eliminate it at worst.
2 Harrying. Whether intentional or as a result of its nature and environment (from howls to magical effects) the party finds its sleep hampered severely by the unsettling mood created by proximity to the Quarry. The party suffers a -1d6 resting penalty modifier.
3 Home Advantage. The Quarry escapes through a terrain that doesn’t hurt or hamper it, but which may prove hazardous or even insurmountable to the party. This may result in the Quarry’s modes of movement coming into play. This complication may not be avoided.
4 Ambush. A group of predators, bandits or scavengers follows the party and decides to strike. Alternatively, provided the Quarry is aware of being hunted, consider that it may attempt to use certain groups or areas to hamper the party. 5 Associates. Whether subservient creatures, symbiotic lifeforms or similar beings, the Quarry has happened upon a group of creatures that will attempt to hamper the party. These allies slow down the party, costing it 1d4 Hunting Successes.
6 Suspicion. Someone just couldn’t keep their mouth shut, or the Quarry has by some other means determined that not all is as it should be. The quarry awareness increases by one step, up to a maximum of alerted. If already at this state, increase the number of days it remains alerted (Table 8-5: Quarry Capabilities) by 1d6 days instead.
7 Increased Resources. The Quarry happens upon some kind of resource that it can use to become more potent. Subject to the GM’s discretion, this either adds a new trap or hazard (Underworld Hazards) to the encounter with the Quarry, grants the Quarry a new lair or legendary action, or decreases the number of actions that a legendary action (one that usually requires multiple actions to perform) takes to complete by one action, to a minimum of one action.
8 The Definition of Grueling. Pursuing the Quarry strains the party to the breaking point. All party members must make camp, find shelter and consume triple rations (or units of stock) OR a single character must consume quintuple rations, but this may lead to discord when camping. This may lead to further discord (GM’s discretion) either when camping (40% chance), 1d3+1 hours into the next day’s travel (40% chance) or after the next fight whenever it may take place (20% chance).
9 Authority Intervention. The local ruler or body of government attempts to intervene with the hunt. Resolving things properly is possible, but costs the party 1d6 days of red tape, haggling and paperwork. For every day spent on this, the party loses 1d3 Hunting Successes. Alternatively, the party may choose to ignore the intervention, but risk being branded as criminals or face similar legal sanctions.
10 Worst Case Scenario. Whether an alerted Quarry or atrocious luck is to blame, the party loses all units of stock—they are dropped, spoiled, infested, and so on. A merciful GM may rule that each character gets to keep no more than 1d2 units of stock. This should only happen once per in-game year; subsequent results should instead either cost 1d6 units of stock or be rerolled.
d10 Possible Minor Complication
1 Tainted Supplies. 1d4 units of stock are tainted. They may be consumed, but doing so may result in exposure to diseases or similar effects.
2 Loud Celebration. A clan celebration, drunkards or a nearby inn make sleeping hard. If not dealt with, the party suffers an additional -1d3 resting penalty modifier during the next night. Dealing with the celebrants alerts the Quarry that something is amiss, rendering it suspicious it if was unaware (Table 8-5: Quarry Capabilities).
3 Dangerous Area. The trail leads through a potentially hostile group’s checkpoint or turf. The dangerous area may be avoided, but doing so entails the loss of a Hunting Success. Additionally, depending on how the group perceives the Quarry, this may render the Quarry aware (Table 8-5: Quarry Capabilities) of being hunted.
4 Bothersome Parasites. The party is exposed to one type of parasite common for the region; if a previous complication involved traders or travelers from another biome, the parasites may stem from this source instead and be rather exotic. Treating the infection may involve painful procedures or rather obvious procedures, rending the Quarry suspicious it if was unaware (Table 8-5: Quarry Capabilities).
5 Sketchy Individuals. Unfriendly intelligent beings inhabit the area and demand a toll. Combat may result, which in turn may render the Quarry suspicious or even alerted (Table 8-5: Quarry Capabilities). Successfully intimidating the beings could end all of this before it starts.
6 Quarry Boon. The Quarry happens upon a minor magic item it can use when finally caught. If it is less intelligent, this may represent having consumed strange things to gain a one-use reaction that e.g. duplicates a potion of superior healing or similar item.
7 Polluted Area. The area that needs to be traversed has been polluted by alchemical ingredients, a plague-ridden mass-grave or similar issues. Braving the polluted area results in exposure to a disease and/or exposure to a minor environmental hazard (Underworld Hazards). The Quarry is also exposed to this pollution. If it is fully affected by the area, the party gains one Hunting Success. The dangerous area may be avoided, but doing so entails the loss of 1d2 Hunting Successes.
8 Strenuous Terrain. The terrain traversed is particularly exhausting. The party may decide to take it slow, requiring two days to traverse the region, accruing no Hunting Successes, or consume one additional unit of stock or provision per character to gain 2 Hunting Successes. Note that, depending on the modes of movement the Quarry has, this delay may apply to the Quarry as well.
9 Blockade. Individuals potentially associated with the Quarry in some way block the trail. The party can attempt to use Charisma (Persuasion) or Charisma (Deception) to attempt to display sympathy or pay off the individuals. Alternatively, they can attempt to bypass the embargo/blockage, but doing so entails the loss of a Hunting Success. Additionally, if the individuals have not been made friendly, they may attempt to render the Quarry suspicious or even alerted (Table 8-5: Quarry Capabilities). If the blocking individuals are hostile to the Quarry, the party instead gains 1d2 Hunting Successes.
10 Yummy Infestation. The party is infested with vermin, mold, or similar threats that may manifest as diseases, poisons, or 1d3 destroyed units of stock per character. Worse, the creatures infesting the party are actually part of the Quarry’s diet, which may result in it having advantage on checks made to notice that it is being hunted for 1d6 days.

When playing with the wilderness rules presented in this site, note that the colloid tends to be relatively well-lit. Providing the climate is moderate and the party has bedrolls and agreeable means of resting, they do not need to pay a unit of stock for comfort while exploring the colloid.

d10 Possible Reprieve
1 Veteran. The party meets a veteran, who can give pointers to tracking down the Quarry. If made friendly, the veteran grants the party 1d2 Hunting Successes or can teach them a trick that will work one time for the current Quarry and reduce quarry awareness by one step.
2 Teleportation Shut-down. The party meets a potent spellcaster or entity, which agrees to prevent the Quarry from using teleportation for 1d6 days.
3 Stealthy Runners. The party has a run of good luck regarding being inconspicuous. The Quarry’s awareness level is reduced by one step.
4 Under My Protection. The party is mistaken for being agents of some powerful being. The characters faces no random encounters for a short period of time (GM’s discretion).
5 Biome Anomaly. Even if the Quarry is usually familiar with the biome it’s in, there is an anomaly that makes it stick out. The Quarry is treated as unfamiliar with the biome for 1d2 days.
6 Friendly Faces. The party meets a group of friendly folks who offer to help it with some local issues. The characters can call upon these beings to, e.g., bypass an embargo or similar minor complication. Alternatively, the group can use its connections to deprive the Quarry of one of its modes of movement for 1d4 days.
7 Lucky Find. The party happens upon a stash of materials which provides 1d3 units of stock.
8 Caught the Trail. The party gains an additional Hunting Success. At the GM’s discretion, this may bolster the party’s mood so much it secretly enhances the next use of Camaraderie.
9 Obliviousness. Whether via a drug, a distraction or something else, the Quarry immediately becomes unaware of the party. If already unaware, the party instead gains 1d4 Hunting Successes.
10 Liability. The Quarry has some sort of liability—harmless young, a sick partner, a fragile item that it wants to protect—and this liability can be exploited during the final confrontation. This result can only be rolled once; reroll any further results.
Table 14-8: Hunting in the Colloid
d10 Possible Major Complication
1 Echoes of Hunters. 1d6 jealous hunters, slain by the Quarry, rise from the colloid, hampering the party’s progress. They behave as hard light phantoms, and unless defeated they cost the party 1d2 Hunting Successes per day they are not dealt with.
2 Phantoms of the Hunted. The entire region is haunted by visions of slain creatures. The Quarry is notified of the presence of the hunting party and their numbers, and becomes alerted (Table 8-5: Quarry Capabilities). Every subsequent roll provides information to the Quarry regarding the look and gear of a single character, allowing intelligent Quarries to make estimates regarding class and capability of the hunting party.
3 War Party. A full-blown war troop of colliatur is setting out for a crystade, an extermination attempt against an undead lair. The troop may attempt to forcefully conscript or attack if the party contains undead or undead-creating entities (such as a dødelig or an obvious death god cleric or necromancer). If the Quarry is undead, they may attempt to slay and utterly annihilate it instead. The Quarry is automatically rendered suspicious (Table 8-5: Quarry Capabilities) by the presence of the massive war party.
4 Infused Teleport. The colloid suffuses the space that both exists between and permeates the party and the Quarry. Attempting to teleport results in exposure to the colloid’s mind, increasing the severity of Colloid Melancholia by +1, no save. This infusion with colloid only resets after leaving the colloid for a month or more.
5 Godless. Divine magic is hampered by the mental might of the colloid suffusing the region. Any healing spell cast by a cleric or druid requires a DC 15 Constitution check to work properly. In addition, devout characters suffer a -4 resting penalty modifier while they hunt in the colloid. These effects extend to the Quarry, if applicable.
6 Shared Awareness. If the Quarry is suspicious, increase the colloid awareness modifiers by +2; if the Quarry is alerted (Table 8-5: Quarry Capabilities), increase the colloid awareness modifier by +4 instead.
7 Haunting Accusations. Phantoms of the slain haunt the characters when they camp for the next 1d3 times, imposing a -6 resting penalty modifier each time due to mild telekinetic harassment, whispered threats and similar unpleasant experiences.
8 Grand Call of the Colloid. Treat the next full day as 2d6 days instead to determine the onset of Colloid Melancholia. If a character already suffers from Colloid Melancholia, they must succeed on a Wisdom saving throw against a major environmental hazard DC (Underworld Hazards) or increase the condition’s severity by +1.
9 Purge the Taint. An area of the colloid is suffused by searing energy. Both hunting party and Quarry must pass through it, which requires a Constitution saving throw against a major environmental hazard DC (Underworld Hazards), taking radiant damage, or half as much on a successful saving throw. Every creature affected is purged of one disease, poison or similar infection. If the Quarry does cross through the hazard, the group loses 1d4 Hunting Successes if they decide to avoid the region. If the Quarry does avoid the region and the party soldiers through it, they gain 1d2 Hunting Successes.
10 Dark Whispers. Phantoms whisper dark impulses to everyone. The mood decreases one step during attempts to make camp, and the party suffers automatically from discord. This lasts for 1d4 attempts to set up camp.
d10 Possible Minor Complication
1 Calls from the Slain. Beseeching wails of slain creatures call out to those who are resting, accompanied by mild telekinetic phenomena that impose a -3 resting penalty modifier.
2 Judgment of the Colloid. The colloid judges all inside it. If the party has killed another sentient creature with an Intelligence of 3 or greater within the last 24 hours, they decrease the onset of Colloid Melancholia by 1d3 days for each sentient creature slain. This also applies to the Quarry. If a creature is already suffering from a stage of Colloid Melancholia, they instead have to immediately make a saving throw against Colloid Melancholia or increase the condition’s severity level by +1.
3 Burning Rays. The trail leads through a potentially grueling area of crystal pylons emitting random beams of concentrated light. Traversing these deals radiant or fire damage to all characters equal to the moderate environmental hazard damage entry (Underworld Hazards). The dangerous area may be avoided, but doing so entails the loss of a Hunting Success.
4 Saved by the Colloid. Once during the next day, a character has to succeed on a DC 15 Charisma saving throw to kill another living being. Failure to do so renders the character incapable of killing the creature. Subduing it is possible. If another character kills the spared creature, the character who failed the saving throw immediately decreases the onset of Colloid Melancholia by 1d10 days. If the character already is suffering from Colloid Melancholia, the condition’s severity level instead increases by 1.
5 End of Life. A single being from a nearby civilization or culture, nearing the end of its life, has been “sent to the colloid” to become one with it, perhaps for being infirm or old. The creature may or may not be willing, but either way, it begs the characters for their help.
6 Infestation Purgative. The party happens upon a natural cauldron containing diamond-like shards of colloid that react violently with slimes and infestations such as insects or parasites. The party may extract 1d6 doses of purgative, which can be used as a thrown weapon against oozes and similar creatures, inflicting severe environmental hazard (Underworld Hazards) acid or radiant (subject to GM’s discretion, whichever would be more suitable or benevolent) damage on a successful saving throw, or half as much on a successful one. The purgative may also be ingested, eliminating an ongoing poison or affliction that causes continuous poison or necrotic damage, but also exposes them to the colloid, reducing their amount of days before suffering Colloid Melancholia by 1d6.
7 Celebrants. A colliatur Messiah is conducting a service reminiscent of attending worship in a deity’s temple. The congregation does not take kindly to having “blood-spillers” and the “murder-minded” interrupt their solemn communion, but can be appeased by displays of party contrition.
8 Colloid Infection. 2d6 units of stock representing part of the party’s water are infected by the colloid. Drinking the water counts as exposure to Colloid Melancholia.
9 Blackmail from Beyond. A hard light phantom of a vanquished enemy manifests, and demands to receive an item as recompense. Failure to comply will have the phantom harry the party for 1d4 days, imposing a -2 resting penalty modifier. Additionally, the phantom will raise the colloid awareness modifier by +1d4.
10 Phantom Guides Through Strenuous Colloid Terrain. The terrain traversed is particularly exhausting. The party may decide to take it slow, requiring two days to traverse the region, accruing no Hunting Successes, or consume one additional unit of stock or provision per character to gain 2 Hunting Successes. Alternatively, they may listen to the phantoms in the colloid to bypass the complication but doing so reduces their amount of days before suffering the onset of Colloid Melancholia by 1d8.
d10 Possible Reprieve
1 Temporary Colloid Apotheosis. Any character suffering from at least one level of Colloid Melancholia gets to choose either swimming speed, climbing speed or burrowing speed, at their full base speed, for 1d8 days while in the colloid. Alternatively, they gain crystalline wings for a flying speed equal to base speed, but the wings only last for 1d3 days. This can mitigate the advantages of the Quarry’s modes of movement.
2 Pyrrhic Victory. The party discovers a slain group of adventurers, turned into parts of the colloid but with serene and content smiles on their faces. The undead creature that defeated the band lies shattered amid the group, destroyed by the power of the colloid. The colloid has absorbed some parts of the adventurers’ gear, but appropriate contact may negotiate the release of an item or two at least.
3 Harried Quarry. Colloid phantoms harry the Quarry, negating one of the modes of movement the Quarry has for 1d2 days.
4 The Colloid’s Gaze. The colloid considers itself to be benevolent and attempts to judge the characters as such. For 1d6 days, whenever the party spares a sentient creature they vanquish, the colloid’s awareness modifier decreases by 1d4.
5 Aid of the Colloid. The colloid points the party towards the target. The party gains an additional Hunting Success equal to 1/2 of the current colloid awareness modifier they have, minimum 1.
6 Well of Light. The party happens upon a well that collects pure colloid energy in a funnel-like structure. Placing a weapon inside will convert its physical form into hard light, changing the damage it inflicts permanently to radiant damage. It takes a month for the energy to replenish itself. A phantom may be present to explain this, subject to the GM’s discretion. Gaining this reprieve’s benefits may require fulfilling a task for the inscrutable colloid, also described by the guardian phantom.
7 Colloid Infection. The Quarry is infected with the colloid, and loses one of its lair or legendary actions, or, if it does not have either, one of its other special abilities. It is regained after the Quarry abstains from visiting the colloid for a month or more.
8 Quarry Delay. The Quarry is temporarily disabled, encased in crystal, or utterly flabbergasted by hard light phantoms. The party gains 1d4 Hunting Successes.
9 A Second Chance. The party happens upon a man-sized, crystalline, capsule-like structure, its door standing open. If a creature enters it, a wave of light glides over the creature. At any point thereafter, if the creature is slain, a colliatur duplicate forms in the capsule. This reprieve may only be encountered once per hunting attempt. Reroll further results.
10 Enhanced Armor. Colloid crystals have grown on the party’s armor and clothing. Until they finish a long rest, they increase their AC by +2. Additionally, the party has advantage on Charisma (Deception) checks made to pass as colliatur.

If using the wilderness rules presented in this site, recall that the fungal jungle is a truly rich biome. Subject to the GM’s discretion, consider foregoing the need to spend units of stock to provide food, and potentially, in particularly humid regions with plentiful fresh water unspoiled by spores and rhizomes, having to spend units of stock for water as well. Instead, use one of your tables for weird magic effects to represent the effects of consuming magical fungi. Table 14-9: Fungal Jungle Hunting

d10 Possible Major Complication
1 Invasive Spore Shower. A colossal mushroom rains invasive, rapacious spores onto the area. This requires a Constitution saving throw against a moderate environmental hazard DC (Underworld Hazards). On a failure, victims take moderate environmental hazard damage (Underworld Hazards), or half as much on a successful saving throw. Acid, poison and necrotic damage are appropriate types.
2 Mushroom Honey. The party chances on a slow-moving waterfall of golden, honey-like substance, dripping from a massive mushroom. It cannot be harvested as it spoils quickly, although it can meet the party’s needs for food and water (it can forego eating and drinking if it camps here). But it is addictive and psychotropic; if just one character eats the honey, the party loses 1d4 Hunting Successes. However, subject to the GM’s discretion, the Quarry may have eaten the honey too when passing by, which means, the party also gains 1d2 Hunting Successes due to the Quarry being drugged and decreasing quarry awareness by one step.
3 Rhizomes in the Magic. An odd, magical rhizome infects a random character capable of spellcasting. When they next cast a spell, they must succeed on an ability check against a moderate environmental hazard DC (Underworld Hazards), using their spellcasting ability modifier. On a failure, the rhizome binds itself to the creature’s spellcasting until they finish a long rest. While their magic is infested, when casting a spell, they must make a Constitution saving throw against a moderate environmental hazard DC (Underworld Hazards). On a failed save, they are afflicted with Shroomitis.
4 Comfortable, But Infested. Soft, fluffy mushrooms that make great bedding cover the floor and cancel any negative resting penalty modifiers that stem from discomfort not based on humidity. But if the party rests here, it is infected by a parasite or disease, or is subjected to Shroomitis, subject to the GM’s discretion.
5 Smoldering Fungal Fire. A dust explosion due to spores has created swaths of smoldering fungal material, choked in greasy smoke. This smoke makes perceiving or tracking targets by scent impossible and imposes disadvantage on Wisdom (Perception) checks based on sight. Traversing the area deals fire or poison damage to all characters equal to the moderate environmental hazard damage entry (Underworld Hazards). The dangerous area may be avoided, but doing so entails the loss of 2 Hunting Success.
6 Temporal Quarry Boon. A mysterious strand of the time-spanning rhyzalla-rhizome determines that the Quarry is of benefit to its interests and deserves help. For 1d10 days, the Quarry is treated as if subject to a haste spell that may not be dispelled.
7 Rhizome Tangle. A massive tangle of fungal tendrils and trunk-like rhizomes blocks all paths. The party needs to have a burrowing or flying speed to navigate the blockage. Subject to the GM’s discretion, other creative means of bypassing the tangle may work as well. The area may be avoided, but doing so entails the loss of a Hunting Success. If the Quarry has a means to bypass the area via burrowing or flying speed, the party loses an additional 1d2 Hunting Successes.
8 Quarry Fungal Teleport. The Quarry stumbles into a volatile fungus that dismantles its bodily structure and reassembles it in another part of the rhizome; it seems the Quarry teleports towards the party. The party immediately encounters the fungal copy of the Quarry, but it dissolves into fetid fungal sludge upon being slain. Meantime, the real Quarry gains ground on the party, decreasing its Hunting Successes by 1d4.
9 Break-Down. Select 1d3 random items that have moving parts, such as crossbows, firearms, or the like. These items are infested with fungi, imposing disadvantage on any check or roll featuring them.
10 Conflux of Doom. The forces guiding the growth of flora determine that the hunting party threatens the integrity of the jungle. As such, the floor seems stickier, dangerous spore-clouds seem to drift towards the party, and everything seems to go wrong. For 1d6 days, abilities or features that allow a character to take no damage on a successful saving throw instead of half damage fail to work and disadvantage is imposed one random saving throw per day. (d6:

1: Strength; 2: Dexterity; 3: Constitution; 4: Intelligence; 5: Wisdom; 6: Charisma) Continued on next page.

d10 Possible Minor Complication
1 Itchy Moss. The floor is littered with moss that emits spores which cause incredibly itchy rashes when trodden on. Unless the party flies above the region, they suffer a -3 resting penalty modifier the next 1d3 times they make camp. An Intelligence (Nature) check against a minor environmental hazard DC (Underworld Hazards) warns the party of this property.
2 Partial Amnesia. The spores can cause temporary and selective amnesia. Each character must succeed on a Constitution saving throw against a moderate environmental hazard DC (Underworld Hazards). On a failed save, the target loses a random proficiency or ability to cast a random spell. The character is not aware of this loss, until they try to use the check or cast the spell. This loss lasts for 1d3 days.
3 Winding Labyrinth. The winding paths of the rhizome make traversing the area slow and laborious, costing the party 1d3-1 Hunting Successes. The area may be avoided, but doing so entails the loss of 2 Hunting Successes.
4 The Dragon’s Mists. Multi-hued banks of fog make navigation nigh impossible. The party must succeed on a Wisdom (Survival) check against a severe environmental hazard DC (Underworld Hazards). On a failure, the characters become lost for 1d3 days, and potentially exposes the party to a disease or poison.
5 Shroomitis Camp. A caravan of various individuals rests here, too weak to go on. The members of the expedition have been infected with Shroomitis and need help to get out of the fungal jungle.
6 Fungal Chasm. The rhizomes of two unimaginably colossal competing mushrooms have torn asunder the earth, creating a massive chasm that must be crossed. Climbing down and up again is slow, requiring two days to traverse the region and accruing no Hunting Successes. Otherwise, the party may consume one additional unit of stock or provision per person to power through the climb and gain 2 Hunting Successes. If the party has means to fly or a climbing speed to bypass the region, it can forego the additional cost in units of stock. Alternatively, the entire party may consume some energizing drug and suddenly find a way. Doing so exposes any users to potential drug addiction.
7 Fungal Corruption. 2d6 units of stock representing the party’s food are infected by the spores. Eating the food counts as exposure to Shroomitis or to another poison or disease, subject to the GM’s discretion. The Quarry fares slightly better, only losing 1d6 units of stock, should the GM be tracking the resource for the Quarry. If not tracking units of stock for the Quarry, grant the hunting party one Hunting Success to represent the Quarry’s need to resupply.
8 This Corrosion. One random full outfit of armor is infected with corrosive mushrooms, rendering it unusable until it has been properly restored by a specialist.
9 Infested Magic. Spellcasters have their magic infested with spores of magical shrooms. On casting their next 1d10 spells, they must succeed on a Constitution saving throw against a minor environmental hazard DC (Underworld Hazards) or suffer hallucinations. Alternatively, use the confusion spell’s effects instead.
10 Fungfusion! Strange spores affect the party! Two randomly chosen characters must succeed on a Charisma saving throw against a severe environmental hazard DC (Underworld Hazards). Nothing happens if only one character fails the saving throw; if both characters fail the saving throw, take the character sheets from the players and have them exchange the characters played—their minds have been switched! If a character with a switched mind dies, their body dies as well. This mind-switch lasts for 1d10 days. Subject to the GM’s discretion, a remove curse spell or similar magic may revert this, if the players absolutely hate the notion.
d10 Possible Reprieve
1 Soothing Mushrooms. The slightly fluorescent mushrooms make it possible for the party to forgo expending units of stock for resting. Additionally, the calming glow improves the party’s mood by one additional step if the characters employ Camaraderie. 2 Stock Out of Time. The temporal distortions caused by rhyzalla dump a totally unexpected 1d10 units of stock right in the middle of a fungal glen. The units of stock are perfectly safe to consume, but their sheer oddness may mean that the party prefers to leave them behind.
3 Caught a Break. The party finds a trail the Quarry has overlooked; the party gains 1d2 additional Hunting Success. At the GM’s discretion, this may bolster the party’s mood so much it secretly enhances the next use of Camaraderie.
4 Fungus-Enhanced Immune System. The party is infected with a benevolent fungal condition that, alas, is short-lived. For the next 1d3 days, the party has advantage on saving throws against diseases, poison and the poisoned condition.
5 Delicious Slurry. The party finds particularly nutritious fungal slurry. This grants them 1d6 units of stock that must be used to slake thirst. If each character drinks from the mellowing slurry, the party mood improves by an additional step, and they gain a +2 resting penalty modifier for the night.
6 Gland Infection. If the Quarry has poison or the ability to inflict acid damage via nonmagical means, the Quarry loses this ability for 1d6 days.
7 Unwise Decisions. The Quarry has partaken of strange mushrooms. It acts as though affected by confusion if tracked down this day.
8 Corrupted Lair. The Quarry is infected with spores that hamper its ability to use some of the features of its lair. The Quarry loses one lair action or legendary action it has; if the Quarry has neither, it loses one of its regular features, resistances or immunities instead, subject to the GM’s discretion.
9 Corrosive Bulbs. The hunting party and the Quarry both lose 1d6 units of stock, but gain 1d6 fungal bulbs. These bulbs may be smeared on a weapon as an action to add +1d4 acid or poison damage to the next 1d6 attacks made with the weapon.
10 Mushroom Paradise. The party finds a region that just exudes bliss and serenity by a combination of spores, available creature comforts and, perhaps, magic! The characters ignore any negative resting penalty modifiers and increase their mood to cheerful.

Hel is a very real place in Aventyr; its desolate shores and Gitwerc cities are considered hell on earth. The planar energies of Hel suffuse the region, making it particularly dangerous to those that do not share the alignment of Hel, Lawful Evil—this holds true for both the party and its Quarry. In order to keep these tables universally useful, and to account for other types of Underworld, the following tables refer to dominant alignment as a term to denote these energies. When Hel’s Taint is referenced, use a substitute condition if you are representing another planar influence. Table 14-10: Hunting in Regions Adjacent to Hel

d10 Possible Major Complication
1 Souls of the Hunted. Whether intentional or as a result of its nature and environment, the Quarry’s presence has resulted in lost souls rising. Their keening is detrimental to attempts to sleep, imposing a -2d4 resting penalty modifier.
2 Tainted Quarry. The Quarry has been exposed to a critical amount of Hel’s Taint. The effects of this may result in alliances with locals, changes in behavior, and so on. If the Quarry is slain and butchered, those carrying parts of it are also exposed to Hel’s Taint, requiring one saving throw per day to avoid increasing the condition severity by one.
3 Waters from Beyond. The Quarry is in a particularly dangerous environment, a place suffused with waters from one of the arms of the mythological rivers like Styx or Lethe. It may be on an islet, on the shore, or in the spray of a rapid. If the Quarry is aware (Table 8-5: Quarry Capabilities) of being hunted, it may use this region for a particularly deadly place to make its stand.
4 Military Drill. The Quarry crosses an area that is used by some highly-organized culture, such as the gitwerc or devils, for an extended military drill. Depending on the nature of the Quarry, this may result in it being slain, causing chaos, or joining or being supported by the local forces! 5 Hunting Rights. The party happens upon two mighty factions discussing the technicalities of who has the hunting rights in the region. They turn towards the party to solve the dispute, and those not properly favored will hold a grudge. Additionally, the victors of the dispute will be in competition with the party. Depending on the Quarry’s nature, it may join forces with either or both of the two factions, perhaps even playing them off against each other while laying the blame at the characters’ feet.
6 Protected Status. The Quarry crosses a region inhabited by beings that consider it either to be allied with a superior or worthy of protection. Ranging from devils to gitwerc, the group will have a staunch belief in defending the Quarry and attempt to hamper and/or eliminate the party.
7 Tainted Supplies. Some of the units of stock of both party and Quarry have been contaminated by Hel’s Taint. Until they are purified in a temple, any character consuming a unit of stock must roll 1d20. On a “1”, the character increases the condition severity of Hel’s Taint by one (no save).
8 Hunting Party of Servants. A magically enslaved pack of creatures, hunting party or group of lost souls has been tasked by its infernal overseer to hunt down the Quarry. This competing hunting group may be willing to bargain to a degree, citing the horrible repercussions the overseer promised for failure.
9 Helish Commander. The Quarry submits to the will of a devil or similarly fiendish entity, or to be enslaved or charmed by it. The entity demands an exorbitant price in exchange for the Quarry, if it is willing to bargain at all.
10 Calls of the Damned. Both the party and Quarry are haunted by the voices of the raging souls of vanquished foes. Any negative resting penalty modifiers are doubled unless a ritual to calm the spirits is performed. This takes a total of 1d4 days and a successful Intelligence (Religion) check against a major environment hazard save DC (Underworld Hazards). The ritual does not have to be performed on consecutive days, but the penalty persists for either as long as it has not been completed or until the affected party leaves the biome.
d10 Possible Minor Complication
1 Infernal Market. The trail leads through a neutral ground of sorts, where the devils and dark masters of Hel barter souls and magic. Engaging in bartering extends the twisted sanctity of the region for the party, but requires trading a soul or magic item. Subject to the GM’s discretion, the market will offer units of stock and mighty, if dark, magics. Depending on the nature of the Quarry, it may resupply, hire henchmen, or attempt to lure the party into breaking the peace accord here. The area may be avoided, but doing so entails the loss of a Hunting Success.
2 Soul Toll. The trail leads through a potentially hostile group’s checkpoint or turf. The group is demanding a soul as a tithe and may be avoided, but doing so entails the loss of a Hunting Success. Additionally, depending on how the group perceives the Quarry, this may render the Quarry aware (Table 8-5: Quarry Capabilities) of being hunted.
3 Infernal Pollution. The area that needs to be traversed has been polluted by infernal sludge from the gitwerc’s forges, toxic protoplasm or similar things. Braving the polluted area results in exposure to both a disease and/or a moderate environmental hazard (Underworld Hazards). The Quarry is also exposed to this pollution. If it is fully affected by the area, the party gains one Hunting Success. The dangerous area may be avoided, but doing so entails the loss of 1d2 Hunting Successes.
4 Tainted Area. The area that needs to be traversed has been tainted by the powers of Hel. Traversing it requires a saving throw against a moderate environmental hazard DC (Underworld Hazards) from both the party and the Quarry. On a failure, 1d3 characters increase the condition severity of Hel’s Taint by one. The dangerous area may be avoided, but doing so entails the loss of a Hunting Success.
5 Avarice. A subtle, unconscious impulse of miserliness overcomes one character, who then squirrels 1d3 units of stock away. The character is not aware of this, but the units of stock may be found, resulting potentially in discord. Unless the party is acting because the Quarry is alerted (Table 8-5: Quarry Capabilities), the character will spend 1d3 days hoarding units of stock.
6 River of Flame. The trail is blocked by a stream or lake of fire or lava, with some means to cross it: a toll bridge, a ferryman, or similar. Both the party and the Quarry can try to use Charisma (Persuasion) or Charisma (Deception) to prevent hostilities and negotiate a means to cross the obstacle. Alternatively, they can attempt to bypass the region, but doing so entails the loss of two Hunting Successes. If the Quarry is aware (Table 8-5: Quarry Capabilities) of being hunted, it may use this region for a particularly deadly place to make its stand.
7 Vermin Ghosts. The party is infested with the tiny ghosts of vermin that manifest as diseases, poisons, or an ethereal Helish miasma that destroys 1d3 units of stock per character. Worse is that despite being ghostly, the creatures infesting the party are actually part of the Quarry’s diet, which may result in it having advantage on checks made to notice that it’s being hunted for 1d6 days.
8 Quarry Boon. The Quarry happens upon an uncommon magic item it can use when finally caught. If it is less intelligent, this may represent having consumed strange things to gain a one-use reaction that, e.g., duplicates a potion of superior healing or similar item. Alternatively, some undead may have joined forces with the Quarry.
9 Strenuous Terrain. The terrain traversed is particularly exhausting. The party may decide to go slowly, requiring two days to traverse the region, accruing no Hunting Successes, or consume one additional unit of stock or provision per character to gain 2 Hunting Successes. Note that depending on the modes of movement the Quarry has, this delay may apply to the Quarry as well.
10 Spiteful Spirits. Souls of the party’s foes seek out the Quarry, attempting to warn it. While incapable of speech, the strange phenomena alert the Quarry that something is amiss, rendering it suspicious it if was unaware (Table 8-5: Quarry Capabilities).
d10 Possible Reprieve
1 Infernal Hunter. The party meets a veteran who can give pointers to tracking down the Quarry—for a price. If the party complies, the hunter grants the party either 1d4 Hunting Successes or can teach them a trick that will work once against the current Quarry and reduce Quarry awareness by one step.
2 Logical Trail. The party, unexpectedly infused with planar energies, suddenly understands the inherent logic of the unfamiliar terrain. If the Quarry does not share the dominant alignment, the party discovers that over the subsequent days, each time it gains a Hunting Success, a second Hunting Success is gained at the same time for no additional effort.
3 Lucky Find. The party happens upon a stash of materials which provide 1d3 units of stock. At the GM’s discretion, this may bolster the party’s mood so much it secretly enhances the next use of Camaraderie.
4 Chained by Hel. The party meets a potent spellcaster or entity who agrees to prevent the Quarry from using teleportation for 1d6 days. Additionally, the Quarry is incapable from leaving the biome for this time.
5 Soul Hounds. The characters meet a group of damned souls they may or may not know. Seeking redemption, the souls offer their help, acting as hounds—all for being allowed to bond with a piece of equipment and be carried out of the biome. Their help manifests in the Quarry being harried. The Quarry loses the party’s choice of either 1d4 units of stock, or its quarry awareness level decreases by one step due to the distractions caused by the souls. Alternatively, the party can call upon these beings to, e.g., bypass a minor complication. Particularly vile parties may barter these souls to the grisly masters of Hel.
6 Soulless Quarry. The Quarry loses parts of its soul. The party gains a Hunting Success, and the Quarry is more likely to stand and fight. However, the Quarry also gains resistance to necrotic damage, or immunity if it already has resistance to necrotic damage.
7 Not Rightfully Hel’s. The party meets a mighty bureaucrat of darksome regions of Hel. If the Quarry gains the benefits of having, e.g., Hel’s Taint making it count as having the dominant alignment, or some other form of protection, the bureaucrat offers to remove these benefits for a price.
8 Chained Abilities. The Quarry had to make a bad trade with a powerful entity of Hel. It loses access to one of its features for the duration of the hunting attempt.
9 Stealthy Runners. The party has a run of good luck regarding being inconspicuous. The Quarry’s awareness level is reduced by one step.
10 Echoes of the Lair. The Quarry is fooled by the spirits of Hel, believing to have found its lair. It behaves and fights as though it has lair actions and the benefits of its lair, but it doesn’t actually have them.

When playing with the wilderness rules presented in this site, note that these tables imply being on or adjacent to a large body of water, which in many instances will be fresh water. Unless the GM decides the water is salty, or a complication indicates it is undrinkable for some other reason, the party need not consume units of stock to quench their thirst, providing it has a means to make a fire and properly ensure the water doesn’t contain anything detrimental.

More so than in other biomes, the natures of both the Quarry and the party are important. If the Quarry is aquatic, the party must have ways to navigate reliably on and in the water, as well as be able to compete under the surface, in order to win. Successful hunts in this region often require belonging to a species adapted to the biome, or powerful magics to make up for shortcomings, such as an inability to withstand water pressure. A Quarry not adapted to the biome may find itself easily cornered.

Table 14-11: Subterranean Shores Hunting
d10 Possible Major Complication
1 Unnerving Murmurs. The waves lapping in the dark seem to murmur of events and secrets best left forgotten. The party takes a cumulative -1 resting penalty modifier for the next 1d4 days, and the Quarry becomes suspicious if it had been unaware (Table 8-5: Quarry Capabilities).
2 Phantom Ferryman. A hooded ferryman offers to carry the party to their goal for the low price of a soul or two copper coins per head—and he is the real deal. The phantom ferryman can help the characters make up for one or more modes of movement that the Quarry has and they lack. He can even bring them unharmed to the bottom of any body of water, whatever the depth.
3 Apex Predator. A massive creature has taken an interest in the Quarry and begins hunting it at the same time as the party. This creature only needs to gain 3d4 Hunting Successes to catch the Quarry. If the Quarry leaves the biome, the apex predator doesn’t follow it.
4 The Call of the Flyers. Bats, strange eyeless birds, or insects hum with trepidation. Increase the quarry awareness by one step.
5 Bound Feast. The Quarry happened upon an execution or sacrifice in progress; a being is bound against the rocks to be engulfed by the waves, or has been left as an oblation to something from the depths. The Quarry consumes or otherwise benefits from the creature, gaining 2d6 units of stock.
6 Lives, Like Foam. The strange gloom of the darkened waves mesmerizes of the Quarry. It decides to make a lair here and stop running.
7 Jellyfish Epidemic. A huge swarm of jellyfish passes or washes ashore. Eating the jellyfish without examining them first with a successful Intelligence (Nature) or Wisdom (Survival) check against a severe environmental hazard DC (Underworld Hazards) causes the party to be so sluggish it won’t make any progress on the day following the consumption of the fish. The Quarry may also fail to realize the nature of the jellyfish. If the Quarry fails and the characters don’t, they gain 1d2 Hunting Successes.
8 Melancholic Waves. The slow lapping of subterranean waves in the dark below can create a curious effect on mortals, instilling a painful sense of longing. The mood cannot rise above Normal for 1d6 days. If the Quarry is intelligent, the party gains a Hunting Success.
9 Bad Waters. Whether due to unpredictable currents, navigational failures, wet and heavy sand or worse along the shore, or some other restrictive event, no progress of any great worth is made during the day. The party loses a Hunting Success.
10 Mating Frenzy. A dangerous aquatic creature has its mating season, making the water seemingly boil with the frenzied beasts. The phenomenon lasts for 1d6 days. During this time, combat encounters with the creatures should be thrice as likely as usual. Depending on the nature of the Quarry, it may be similarly delayed or bypass the frenzy unhindered. Traversing the region is not wise. Making a detour to avoid it costs the party 2 Hunting Successes.
d10 Possible Minor Complication
1 Endless Drone. An otherworldly drone from the water’s darkest depths carries across the waves, inflicting -2 resting penalty modifier.
2 Minerals in the Water. While not deadly, the water here seems to have been tainted by some minerals that are harder for most species to process, inflicting the poisoned condition on a failed Constitution saving throw against a moderate environmental hazard DC (Underworld Hazards) for 24 hours on any that drink it. An Intelligence (Nature) or Wisdom (Survival) check against a moderate environmental hazard DC (Underworld Hazards) realizes this. Consuming units of stock instead of drinking the water prevents this. The Quarry may or may not instinctively know about this, especially if it is not familiar with the biome.
3 Sharp Shores/Rocks. The path leads through a potentially grueling area of sharp, caltrop-like shells or other, dangerously sharp rocks. Traversing these deals slashing, piercing or poison damage to all characters equal to the moderate environmental hazard damage entry (Underworld Hazards). The dangerous area may be avoided at the cost of a loss of a Hunting Success. The Quarry is also exposed to this and takes damage for crossing this region. If injured thus, it may be tracked more easily for 1d3 days.
4 Eel Infestation. The region is infested by an uncountable number of particularly disgusting eels. Unless kept at bay, they transmit diseases (GM’s choice). If the Quarry is aware (Table 8-5: Quarry Capabilities) of being hunted, it will weaponize the eels as a lair action if it stands and fights.
5 Shipwrecked. A creature survived a shipwreck. Depending on the nature of the Quarry, it may have caused the shipwreck or even saved the creature. In the former case, the Quarry gains 1d3 units of stock; in the latter, it has just gained a faithful minion.
6 Sucked Below. The Quarry is sucked below the waves, only to have something unexpected occur, such as stumbling upon an ancient ruin or the like. Getting to it will become harder, as whatever it found makes for a great place to build a lair. If the Quarry is incapable of breathing underwater, either it has perished here (50% chance) or discovered somewhere that some form of readily available and constantly replenished air (50% chance).
7 Cursed Treasure. The Quarry has inadvertently vanquished a cursed guardian of something powerful. Either that potent creature or item is released, or the Quarry becomes the new guardian, which includes developing dangerous new abilities and lair actions.
8 Clambush. The Quarry was swallowed by a gigantic clam, either managing to get behind the party (if aware, see Table 8-5: Quarry Capabilities) or to be transformed into something strange. It may well turn the tide in the fight against the party.
9 20,000 Leagues Below. The Quarry has happened upon a device or magical stream that carried it to the depths of the ocean, yet protected it from the crushing pressure. This may make it unreachable for the party, unless it can identify the phenomenon or have alternative means to get below.
10 Maelstrom. Somewhere in the distance, a massive vortex spontaneously generates. This may block passage for 1d6 days, shipwreck the party, wash creatures ashore, or worse. The Quarry is not exempt from the effects.
d10 Possible Reprieve
1 Vestraadi. The party happens upon a settlement or hunting group of vestraadi, that is willing to help the party with its hunt. The vestraadi can provide the means to breathe water and adapt to the depths, and provide 1d4 Hunting Successes.
2 Lucky Tides. A series of good winds and waves carry the characters towards their destination. They gain a Hunting Success.
3 Sargasso Doom. The Quarry is entangled within a massive field of sargasso. It is restrained and incapable of running farther.
4 The Sea’s Bounty. Both the Quarry and the party receive 2d6 units of stock.
5 Mating Season Aftermath. A vast shoal of creatures has just ended its mating frenzy, littering the waters with victims of the tumult. While it tastes foul, the free feast means that no hunters will track the party for 1d2 days. The lack of other threats means that the Quarry is more keenly aware of being followed. It should be considered to be at least suspicious, and any checks it makes to notice being hunted are made at advantage.
6 Powerful Flotsam. The party finds a powerful, potentially magical piece of flotsam. At the GM’s discretion, this may bolster the party’s mood so much it secretly enhances the next use of Camaraderie. 7 The Sea’s Protection. Salt crystals or similar mineral growths have formed on the characters’ armor and clothing, as well as on the Quarry. Until they finish a long rest, they increase their AC by +2.
8 Fey of the Darkened Waters. A fey creature offers to aid the party in tracking down the Quarry, in exchange for a shadow. If the party accepts, the fey can provide the means to breathe water, withstand pressure, and swim faster. This, at the very least, grants 1d6 Hunting Successes.
9 Kraidyl Survivors. The Quarry has stumbled into an ambush of the bloodthirsty kraidyl, severely wounding most of them. The kraidyl can point the party in the right direction and do not attack them—for now. The Quarry took damage equal to half of its current hit points in the altercation.
10 Elemental Cascade. The water and a barely-submerged volcano generate a constant steamy and searing-hot interplay of fire and water that is both wondrous to witness and exceedingly deadly. Unless the Quarry is familiar with the biome, it takes 1d6 days to bypass this region. If the Quarry is native to the biome, aware (Table 8-5: Quarry Capabilities) of being hunted, and capable of withstanding the deadly elemental forces at play, it may decide to make a stand here.

The most dangerous and deepest regions of the Underworld are sparse, deadly, and potentially maddening. There is no light in these depths, at least none that would be benevolent. An uncanny silence, broken only by the deep thrum of seismic activity, permeates this hostile region. Consider asking for saving throws to prevent madness if the party lingers for too long in this biome and does not keep its mood at Good or better. If the party is left stranded in the dark, insanity or death are all but guaranteed. Unless truly desperate, insane, or native to this biome, few Quarries will attempt to flee here—many sentient creatures prefer dying to venturing into these most desolate and forlorn places, all too aware of the chance of being lost forever. The Darkness is also present.

Table 14-12: Lightless Abyss Hunting
d10 Possible Major Complication
1 Essence of Paranoia. The disquieting, stark darkness infuses everything. 1d3 characters must succeed on a Wisdom saving throw against a severe environmental hazard DC (Underworld Hazards) or suffer from the effects of paranoia. The Quarry permanently becomes suspicious if it was previously unaware, or permanently alerted, if it was suspicious (Table 8-5: Quarry Capabilities).
2 Weaver in the Black. The Quarry is trapped in a cocoon made from fine strands of Darkness. This changes the Quarry into a grotesque arachnid over the course of 1d2 days. After this, the Quarry may await the hunting party in its web of dense tenebrosity (if aware of being hunted) or proceed. Whichever, it gains a climbing speed equal to its base Speed, can pass through webs or the like unimpeded, and may develop other new abilities.
3 Fear of the Light. The Quarry, touched by the Darkness, becomes horribly afraid of the light. After 1d6 days, its eyes grow shut and it gains blindsight 120 feet as well as a Keen Sense of Hearing and Smell.
4 Clashed Eons. The Darkness warps time itself! Until they each finish their next long rest, both the party and the Quarry find they must make a Wisdom saving throw at the start of each combat, with a moderate environmental hazard DC (Underworld Hazards). Creatures that fail are struck as if by a slow spell for 1 minute, which cannot be dispelled. At the GM’s discretion, the party and/or the Quarry arrive in another age. A Quarry visiting the past may change history or return from the future with powers that will not be known for eons, while the party may meet itself before (in the past) or after (in the future) this fight.
5 Skittering Darkness. In the heavy gloom, cavorting shades and menacing shadows prevent the use of Camaraderie, as barely-perceived adumbrations constantly skitter at the edge of vision, and attempts to improve the mood this way by even a single step immediately fail for the next 1d6 days. Additionally, both hunting party and the Quarry suffer a -3 resting penalty modifier.
6 Better the Dark than You. The Quarry plunges willingly into a chasm of Darkness. If the characters jump, each of them emerges from a fault perfectly shaped like them, next to a hole shaped like the Quarry. They seem to have teleported and only require 1 Hunting Success to catch the Quarry. But features are off: scars are missing, beauty spots misplaced, wrinkles formed more deeply, and so on. From there on in, there is something wrong, and the characters regularly dream of falling endlessly through the maddening Darkness. They have to roll once on Table 15-9: Call of the Lightless Abyss and may only ever lose the result by direct divine intervention.
7 A Call of Deafening Silence. The somniferous quiescence insinuates its way into the minds of both the characters and the Quarry, implanting dread thoughts and sinister suggestions. All those affected must roll twice on Table 15-9: Call of the Lightless Abyss.
8 Claustrophobic Trek. The caves and tunnels narrow to a constricting chasm, through which the larger party members and the Quarry can barely move. Subject to the GM’s discretion and size categories involved, it may be a dead end for all those too big to pass through its confines. Escaping the fissure takes 1d3 days. You can’t turn back, and on emerging, any who dared the chasm must succeed on a Wisdom saving throw against a major environmental hazard DC (Underworld Hazards) or suffer from claustrophobia, becoming frightened in any tunnel tight enough to require squeezing.
9 A Chthonic Hunger. Something horrible, never encountered before, stirs in the Darkness, aroused by the party’s hurried passage. It craves the warmth of life, and starts to hunt the party as a Quarry, requiring a number of Hunting Successes equal to the members’ combined Wisdom modifiers, plus their average proficiency modifier (round down).
10 Cursed Dark. During the party’s first long rest after this roll, the very force that created the Darkness comes to the characters in their dreams and warns them, as “mere mortals”, not to venture foolishly into its depths. But it is too late! For 1d6 days, any ability or feature of the party or Quarry that allows them to take no damage on a successful saving throw instead of half damage ceases to work. Additionally, for the same number of days, this imposes disadvantage on a random saving throw each day. (d6: 1: Strength; 2: Dexterity; 3: Constitution; 4: Intelligence; 5: Wisdom; 6: Charisma) Continued on next page.
d10 Possible Minor Complication
1 Memories Lost. The Darkness makes it easy to forget. About light. About laughter. Who you are. Each character must succeed on a Constitution saving throw against a moderate environmental hazard DC (Underworld Hazards). On a failed save, the target loses a random proficiency or ability to cast a random spell. The character is not aware of this loss, until they try to use the check or cast the spell. This loss lasts for 1d3 days. Depending on the nature of the Quarry, it may be affected as well. Some whisper that such memories will coalesce into congealed, doppelganger-like demons, devoted to hunting down their source.
2 The Quarry and the Lost. A creature lost to the call of the Lightless Abyss stumbles from the cloying Darkness—it claims to be one of the characters or a well-known NPC, returned as the grotesquely changed sole survivor from hunting the Quarry. It seems to have an uncanny knowledge of the party and its Quarry, and beseeches the characters to abort the hunt before they end up suffering its fate.
3 Radiation. This region emits a harmful, if not deadly radiation. Unless the party flies above it or has suitable precautions, such as force effects or sheets of lead to put below their mattresses, they suffer a -3 resting penalty modifier the next 1d3 times they make camp. A successful Intelligence (Nature) check against a minor environmental hazard DC (Underworld Hazards) warns the party of this property. The Quarry suffers the same effects unless it makes its saving throw.
4 Non-Euclidian Paths. The rules of gravity and perspective break down. The region becomes mind-boggling, an Escher-like panoply of impossible, intersecting tunnels. Make a contested Wisdom check between the Quarry and the character with the highest Wisdom. The loser must roll on Table 15-9: Call of the Lightless Abyss. If the character loses the contested check, the party gains 1d4 Hunting Success due to the tainted insight. If the Quarry loses the contested check, the hunting party instead loses 1d4 Hunting Successes, as the Quarry can use its insane insight to navigate the nightmarish labyrinth.
5 Escape. The Quarry finds a path into another biome. Depending on its nature, it may attempt to disguise or even seal off the escape route. Clearing the route costs the party 1d3 Hunting Successes.
6 Vantablack Magic. A spellcaster’s magic is imbued with the sentience of Darkness; when they cast their next 1d6 spells they chose whether to harness this fell power. If they do, they must succeed on a Constitution saving throw against a minor environmental hazard DC (Underworld Hazards). If successful, they don’t have to expend spell slots when casting. If unsuccessful, they roll on Table 15-9: Call of the Lightless Abyss. If a successful caster then chooses NOT to use the Darkness to cast a single spell from the allotted 1d6, it becomes angry, if such an emotion is ascribable to it, and grants its spellcasting benefits to the Quarry for 1d6 days, whether the creature’s casting is learned or innate.
7 Rapid Calcification. The Quarry has contracted a strange disease that renders is nigh-impervious to damage, as it is encased in jet-like minerals formed of solid Darkness. Its Speed decreases by 5 feet each day for 1d6 + 1 days, but it also gains immunity to bludgeoning, piercing and slashing damage. If its Speed reaches 0 feet, it is petrified. At the GM’s discretion, the light-absorbing mineral coating renders it effectively invisible as well.
8 Supernatural Darkness. The Darkness cloaks an entire region. Navigation needs to be by senses other than sight. Having a vestraadi guide with their sonar grants the party 2 Hunting Successes unless the Quarry benefits from some means to navigate in utter blackness. Without a guide, it takes a Wisdom (Survival) check against a severe environmental hazard DC (Underworld Hazards) or the party takes 1d6 days to navigate through the all-encompassing Darkness.
9 Tithe of the Abyss. 2d6 units of stock fall into a chasm. No sound of it hitting the ground is ever heard, as the rift is apparently bottomless. However, it must lead somewhere…

At the GM’s discretion, a character can go after to catch them; refer to Table 2-2 if you want to increase the tension of the attempt to recover the lost stock.10Time’s Toll. One random item or 1d6 units of stock is affected by a localized bubble of sped-up time and crumbles to dust, irrevocably lost.

d10 Possible Reprieve
1 A Champion of an Age Long Gone. The Quarry stumbles across the ageless champion of a culture from a previous age. It triumphs or escapes, but only barely. Reduce the Quarry’s hit points to 1d4 until it finishes a long rest.
2 Glimpse of the Future. A character sees a vision of the future in the Darkness—tell them one of the abilities of the Quarry that the party does not know about. Alternatively, have the party roll a d20, record the result, and allow them to use that roll anywhere in the encounter once they catch up to the Quarry.
3 Snap. The Quarry breaks one of its appendages that becomes trapped in a jagged crack. Its Speed is halved.
4 Shrouded Memories. The Quarry forgets that it is being hunted. Its quarry awareness level reverts to unaware (Table 8-5: Quarry Capabilities).
5 Comforting Darkness. The Darkness cradles its children. Every character must roll on Table 15-9: Call of the Lightless Abyss, but every affected character also has advantage on all saving throws for 1d6 days after that.
6 Time Hungers. The Darkness swallows the present and future moments in time spent drinking and feasting, consuming 1d6 units of stock. However, for every unit of stock thus lost, one randomly-chosen character does not need to eat or drink for 1d6 days.
7 Aggressive Minerals. The hunting party and the Quarry both lose 1d6 units of stock, but start developing aggressively-growing mineral shards. These shards may be smeared on a weapon as an action to add +1d4 piercing or slashing damage to the next 1d6 attacks made with the weapon.
8 No Home. The Darkness is home to none. The Quarry loses one lair action or legendary action it has; if the Quarry has neither, it loses one of its regular features, resistances or immunities instead, subject to the GM’s discretion.
9 Devolution. The Quarry loses one of its limbs, as it degenerates rapidly back through time and reverts to being a gruesomely disfigured lump of useless flesh.
10 No Way Back. A distortion in either time, space, or both, permanently cuts off the trail back. It also twists the Quarry’s path in a loop, granting the hunting party 1d4 Hunting Successes.

Underworld Environmental Conditions

Hyperthermia & Hypothermia

It’s clear that delving through the Underworld’s depths will bring its own tests; as such, the following optional conditions can help differentiate between biomes. Unless another condition or a GM’s decision states otherwise, characters exposed to one of the following must succeed on a Constitution saving throw against a severe environmental hazard DC (Underworld Hazards) to avoid their debilitating effects. These conditions function much like the 6-level exhaustion condition. Hyperthermia—elevated body temperature—occurs when thermoregulation fails and a body produces or absorbs more heat than it dissipates. Extreme temperatures quickly become emergencies needing urgent treatment to prevent disability or death. See Table 16-1. Hyperpyrexia is an extreme form of hyperthermia that occurs in the harshest hot environs. Prior to death victims may experience their blood boiling or becoming a column of flames. Hypothermia—reduced body temperature—happens when a body dissipates more heat than it absorbs and its core falls below 35.0 °C (95.0 °F). Symptoms again quickly worsen and need rapid healing. Table 16-2 describes its effects.

Table 15-2: Hypothermia Condition
Level Effect
1 Frost-touched. Skin itches but hurts when scratched, before slowly becoming numb. Characters suffer a -2 penalty on Strength and Dexterity checks.
2 Bleached. Yellow and white patches begin to form on the skin; these rapidly lose feeling. The character has a 50% chance to shiver uncontrollably when attempting a Strength or Dexterity check or saving throw, making the check or saving throw with disadvantage.
3 Shivering. The character now shivers constantly, their teeth chattering. A shivering spellcaster must make a DC 10 Constitution check to cast a spell with a verbal or somatic component; on a failed check, the spell slot is expended. Tasks that require manual precision, such as opening a lock or getting into or out of armor take twice as long. The character may also begin suffering from short-term madness on a failed saving throw, with most common examples being paradoxical undressing, terminal burrowing, or wendigo-psychosis.
4 Hypothermia. The character gains a level of exhaustion and can’t recover from exhaustion until after a long rest in a warm environment. The skin develops black blisters, but also becomes entirely numb. A hypothermic character is only tangentially aware of their surroundings and is incapable of benefiting from passive Perception—only actively straining for something will yield information about dangers. Additionally, even the simplest activities requiring manual Dexterity now require a DC 10 Dexterity check to perform; on a failure, the character fumbles, dropping the item. Complex tasks, such as opening a lock, become impossible.
5 Frostbitten. The character is incapacitated and gains another level of exhaustion. As time passes organs begin to fail, digits are lost as fingers and toes break off, and other permanent injuries happen. The GM is the final arbiter of the full effects of such injuries, but a permanent reduction of maximum Hit Points by 1d6 per day spent frostbitten is a good suggestion.
6 Frozen Solid. The character is frozen solid and their death is almost certainly guaranteed. Subject to the GM’s discretion, however, magical cold may cryogenically petrify creatures instead, allowing them to be thawed at a later stage and be returned to life.
Table 15-1: Hyperthermia Condition
Level Effect
1 Heat-touched. Concentration starts to suffer slightly; profuse sweating and mild headaches begin. Heat-touched characters have a -2 penalty on Intelligence and Wisdom checks.
2 Dehydrated. The character begins to have trouble focusing on tasks. Activities requiring lengthy concentration take twice as long to complete successfully as the mind wanders. A dehydrated spellcaster must succeed on a DC 10 Constitution check to cast any spell with a casting time greater than 1 action. On a failure, the spell slot is expended.
3 Hyperthermia. The character gains a level of exhaustion and can’t recover from exhaustion until after a long rest in sufficiently cool environments and with sufficient hydration. The number of units of stock of fluid required equals the victim’s level of exhaustion. The liquid is consumed over the course of a long rest. Head-aches become crippling, and the character suffers a -2 penalty to Charisma and Dexterity checks. Additionally, whenever the character moves more than half their Speed in a given round, they must subtract 1d4 from all d20 rolls until the start of their next turn.
4 Heatstroke. The character can barely walk anymore and has disadvantage on all Strength and Dexterity checks and saving throws. Every time the character takes a reaction or bonus action in addition to their regular action and movement in a given round, they reduce their maximum Hit Points by 1d6. This reduction stacks with itself and remains in effect until the character no longer suffers from hyperthermia.
5 Barely Coherent. The character gains a level of exhaustion, and even simple tasks such as drawing a weapon, notching an arrow or retrieving something from a backpack require a successful DC 10 Intelligence or Wisdom check (at disadvantage due to exhaustion) to accomplish without fumbling and dropping the item, not finding it no matter how long it is searched for, or forgetting what one wanted to retrieve in the first place.
6 Death. The character dies.

Hel’s Taint

Far below the surface there is a region beyond the sprawling, subterranean civilizations, a mythic Underworld closer to the realms of deities than to that of mortals. Suffused with the power engendered from the beliefs of untold numbers of civilizations, this region may overlap with the realms of the dead, see the grand extraplanar rivers Styx or Lethe flow through, or feature the hellish vistas of the Lower Planes. Indeed, there is a rich tradition of overlaps between the regions—in Aventyr, this locale is known as Hel, and it is where the loathsome gitwerc and their infernal masters toil. Proximity and prolonged exposure to these quasi-infernal regions can result in mortals being tainted by the foul energies that suffuse their darkened halls. While Hel’s Taint assumes the cosmology of Aventyr as a default, the condition may be used to represent any type of mythic Underworld that is associated with notions of hell or a similarly dire place.

As a place allied with a particular Lower Plane, first determine an alignment to be the one suffusing this place. In the case of Hel, this would be Lawful Evil, but if you want to depict an Underworld overlapped by the Abyss, it would be Chaotic Evil. It should be noted that, with a little work, you could theoretically use this framework to depict Neutral taints for your Underworlds, or areas overlapping with the Upper Planes. For the purpose of the rules in this chapter, Lawful Evil is the dominant alignment for the condition. When changing the condition to represent, e.g., Chaotic Evil, consider including effects such as bursts of random violence or pettiness as a replacement for the very “Lawful” effects below.

Long-term exposure to the tainted energies of Hel is measured in six levels. If you are using Hel’s Taint as a condition for brief trips into such regions (for example a single adventure or a couple of dungeon levels), all effects that would increase exhaustion levels should instead increase Hel’s Taint. As a default, a character can usually travel through the tainted area for a number of days equal to their proficiency bonus + their Charisma modifier, as stronger personalities have an easier time resisting a change to their personality structures. After that, one saving throw after each long rest is suggested.

Similarly, if you simply want to simulate survival in such regions, you should use this method. Note that certain hazards and creatures may expose characters to Hel’s Taint, regardless of this period. If the character fails their saving throw, they are affected by Hel’s Taint, regardless of how many days of passive exposure they would still have. Particularly Lawful Evil actions should incur the risk of immediate exposure.

If your game involves a mythic number associated with legendary journeys through the Underworld, consider using that number instead of the suggested method. For example, if your game features an Orpheus and Eurydice-based adventure, where Orpheus spends eight days in the Underworld rescuing Eurydice, or if you follow an Aztec-themed journey for the soul of four years before it reaches its final destination, let Hel’s Taint function as a timer of sorts, marking the passage of an ever-progressing condition. Hel’s Taint would be incurable while in the afterlife, and progress at least one level after each quarter of the mythic number: that means one step every two days for Orpheus, and one step every year for an Aztec venturing into the Underworld, for example. This would also explain why individual souls hurry towards journey’s end; if a soul lingers for the maximum time, it’ll progress four steps.

Hel’s Taint is an affliction that represents being tainted with planar energies of one specific alignment, namely Lawful Evil—this is the dominant alignment, and creatures of this alignment are immune to the effects of Hel’s Taint. Such creatures do not become immune to Hel’s Taint, just its effects, and can gain exhaustion as usual.

After the grace period of exposure to Hel’s Taint has elapsed, a character must succeed on a DC 15 Charisma saving throw or contract a level of Hel’s Taint. Since Hel’s Taint is a spiritual affliction, certain behaviors can make it harder to resist. The increases should be cumulative, and per instance. Several suggestions are presented on Table 15-3.

Hel’s Taint is not a disease, being closer to a curse or a stain upon the soul. As such, it cannot be cured with the usual methods, and does not simply vanish. Instead, selfless and chaotic behavior, such as breaking your word, refusing to obey or acts of meaningful revolution, preferably at the cost of personal distress, reduce the current level of Hel’s Taint by 1. Subject to the GM’s discretion, one casting of remove curse or similar magic may reduce the level of Hel’s Taint by 1.

Subject to the GM’s discretion, particularly chaotic or good actions may offset these increases or provide reductions to the saving throw DC to resist Hel’s Taint.

Table 15-3: Hel’s Taint DC by Behavior Behavior Saving Throw DC modifications
Intimidating those weaker to prevent hostilities/harm +1
Adhering to the wording of an agreement, not its intent +1
Tyrannical, authoritarian behavior +1
Following orders, in spite of disagreeing with them +1
Deception through technicalities in wording +2
Intimidating those weaker for selfish gains +2
Using subordinates/others to divert harm +2
Showing a callous lack of compassion +2
Enslaving a creature +3
Summoning a devil or Lawful Evil fiend +3
Severely harming or killing an enslaved creature +4
Consuming/condemning a soul for personal gain +5
Table 15-4: Hel’s Taint Levels
Level Effect
1 Tainted. Your soul has been tainted by the region’s darkened energies. For the purpose of spells and effects, you are treated as Lawful Evil if doing so would be more detrimental to you, regardless of your actual alignment.
2 Hierarchical Mind I. You become frightened more easily, but only by creatures stronger than you. You increase the duration of the frightened condition you suffer from any effect by 1 round. If the effect is dispelled, you continue to be frightened for 1 round after it is dispelled. Additionally, if you have immunity to fire or necrotic damage, you reduce one (GM’s choice) of them to having only resistance to it.
3 Hierarchical Mind II. You suffer from disadvantage on saving throws to resist spells and features that impose the frightened condition. However, you have advantage on saving throws against spells and features that impose the frightened condition if the originating creature seems to be weaker than you. Additionally, if you have resistance to fire or necrotic damage (including from the 2nd level of the Hel’s Taint condition), you lose one of them (GM’s choice).
4 Merciless. You have to succeed on a Charisma saving throw against the last Hel’s Taint saving throw you made in order to grant quarter and refrain from killing a creature. On a failed save, you cannot abide the weak and vanquished remaining alive, and will attempt to eliminate them.
5 Total Obedience. You have to succeed on a Charisma saving throw against the last Hel’s Taint saving throw you made to engage in any illicit behavior, or to refuse any order. You are essentially permanently charmed by any order issued with authority. Only an order issued from a being with superior authority can offset this—immunity to being charmed does not protect against this compulsion. Subject to the GM’s discretion, remove curse may suppress one order for a day.
6 Tyrant. You become Lawful Evil, with a firmness of conviction rivaling that of devils. Subject to the GM’s discretion, this may mean that the character becomes an NPC, or that a major quest is in order to help the character atone.

Shroomitis

Fern-like growths and timorous, ill-colored cilia sprouting from where they shouldn’t be; porous boils oozing dark fluid with a stench of rot; a wheezing cough—a seasoned Underworld explorer knows a hunchbacked Shroomitis victim for what they are and duly gives them a wide berth. Guards prevent the infected from entering settlements, and adventurers finding complexes bereft of people, but with disturbingly face-like patterns in the overgrown rhizomes, have all learned to fear the plague that is Shroomitis. While the condition per se is well-known, it is actually a misnomer—there is no singular disease, but rather a vast array of different conditions that are collectively referred to as Shroomitis due to their shared origin. The combination of abundant magical energies in the Underworld and the huge number of different spores found in the fungal jungles often react in unique and frightening ways, sometimes compromising the immune systems of those exposed to them—often with truly frightening effects. What starts as little more than an allergic reaction can swiftly become a cataclysmic contagion, and many a scholar of the subterranean races is devoted to finding means to combat the inevitable pandemic that is bound to hit sooner or later. Shroomitis is not the reaction to a single microorganism, but to a vast collection of spores, rhizomes and magical energies.

Since Shroomitis is not a singular affliction, the GM may choose to develop a plethora of variations that may or may not be cured or have its level decreased with applications of a DC 15 Wisdom (Medicine) check, various native remedies, or by magical means. As an obstacle that is part of a journey, Shroomitis should be treatable by mundane and magical means. A magic-resistant, particularly nasty strain, on the other hand, may require the help of a funglet spore-cerer (Occult Secrets of the Underworld, page 34), rare ingredients, or similar quests to cure it. Funglets are immune to all known variants of Shroomitis, but this does not mean they are resistant to new strains…

Long-term exposure to the virulent spores of a fungal jungle is measured in six levels. If you are using Shroomitis as a condition for brief trips into such regions (for example a single adventure or a couple of dungeon levels), all effects that would increase exhaustion levels should instead worsen the Shroomitis-infection. Unless the GM is looking for a particularly grueling trek, combining Shroomitis with exhaustion is not recommended for short-term infections.

As a default, a character can usually travel through the constant barrage of spores for a number of days equal to their proficiency bonus + their Constitution modifier. After that, one saving throw after each long rest is suggested. Immunity to diseases does not grant immunity to Shroomitis, as fungi can invade and grow on, or in, virtually anything. If you simply want to simulate survival in fungal jungles, you should use this method. Note that certain hazards and creatures may expose characters to Shroomitis, regardless of this initial period. If the character fails their saving throw, they are affected by Shroomitis, regardless of how many days of passive exposure they had left to experience.

If you’re using a magic-resistant Shroomitis for a pandemic scenario, you should instead contemplate using it as a timer of sorts, calling for saving throws according to the demands of your respective timeline. The default Constitution saving throw DC for Shroomitis is 15, though more virulent varieties are known. There also have been reports of psychically-charged strains of Shroomitis that affect the mind, requiring a Wisdom saving throw instead. Strains that infect both body and mind are rumored to exist, but so far have not been successfully documented by survivors.

A horrible property of Shroomitis that makes it particularly feared among adventurers is the tendency of the affliction to actually benefit from curative magic. As the infection is a living collective entity slowly fusing with the host body and overwriting it, curative magic that closes wounds can actually hasten and worsen the affliction. Whenever an affected creature is magically healed, be it from potions or spells, its next saving throw DC to resist the progression of Shroomitis increases according to Table 15-5. This increase resets if Shroomitis progresses to a new level.

Table 15-5: Increase in Shroomitis Virulence Due to Curative Magics
Hit Points Magically Healed Since Last Long Rest Saving Throw DC
0 +0
1-10 +1
11-20 +2
21-30 +3
31-40 +4
41-50 +5

On the Use of the Infested

Particularly evil or amoral individuals have taken to the practice of using spore-slaves to explore overly poisonous or acidic environments—both drow and funglets (the former out of sheer sadism, the latter out of an alien pragmatism) have been known to infect captives in a controlled manner to allow them to explore regions that would spell death to the uninfected. This is a highly risky endeavor, even with magic overriding the Shroomitis infection’s drive to spread, and has spelled doom for many an expedition. Of course a few victims escape and survive, which has lead some foolhardy groups of adventurers to use the same strategy: infecting themselves to explore some of the most hostile regions of the Underworld, but there are no records of any of them resurfacing.

Table 15-6: Shroomitis Levels
Level Effect
1 Infected. Your eyes water and itch, you swell up, and patches of your skin become raw. You have disadvantage on Constitution checks and Wisdom (Perception) checks relying on sight. The distance you can see with darkvision and similar modes of vision relying on sight is halved.
2 Compromised. Parts of your body continue to swell to the degree where you cannot stand upright anymore, so you adopt a hunched gait. You may no longer use the Dash action. A DC 15 Wisdom (Medicine) check with a heated lancet may be used to pop these swellings, spreading pus and spores in a 5-foot radius. This reduces your maximum hit points by 1d6 until you are fully cured of Shroomitis, but also prevents you from having to save against the condition the next time you finish a long rest. However, the infection does fortify you against toxins—you gain advantage on saving throws against the poisoned condition.
3 Carrier. Your frame is bent over and hunched by the fat, spore-filled boils growing on your back. Armor barely fits and is uncomfortable, squeezing the throbbing furuncles into your flesh. The pustules may no longer be lanced in a contained manner, but the rhizomes bonding with your nervous system gives you limited control over these boils. When taking fire damage, you can use your reaction to have the boils pop in a spurt of pus and emit a miasmic spore cloud in a 30-foot-radius sphere centered on you. The cloud grants you, and only you, half cover, and exposes anybody inside it to Shroomitis. You may do this a number of times equal to your Constitution modifier before requiring a long rest to replenish the pustules. Strong wind disperses the cloud. Your Speed is halved due to the pain of moving with your boils, whether closed or open.
4 Sentient Vector. The spore cloud from the third condition level now grants you three-quarters cover. Additionally, you gain resistance to poison and acid damage, as well as immunity to the poisoned condition. However, the invasive rhizomes have begun affecting your reasoning. The infection coerces you to seek magical healing for injuries whenever possible. This, of course, exacerbates the problem, as outlined on Table 15-5. In addition, you are drawn to areas of warmth, particularly ones containing a lot of sentient creatures. If inside such an area, you have to succeed on your choice of a Constitution or Wisdom saving throw against the current Shroomitis saving throw DC, or involuntarily emit a spore-cloud—Shroomitis seeks to spread and infect as many creatures as possible. You risk involuntarily emitting a spore-cloud a number of times per day equal to your Constitution modifier, but do so at least once per day.
5 Shroom-Slave. You become immune to acid and poison damage, but also are permanently charmed by the Shroomitis infection, seeking to blight as many creatures as possible. The charmed condition is due to the rhizomes infesting your nervous system, and as such, this overrides any immunity to the charmed condition a creature might have. Unlike regular charmed creatures, you remain fully sentient of your body’s behavior, and may speak as normal, warning people away. Subject to the GM’s discretion and cruelty, you may need to succeed on a Wisdom saving throw to warn, e.g., loved ones away, as the infection perniciously and slowly convinces you that they’re better off as part of the rhizome—they become one with you, after all… 6 Apotheosis. The character is functionally dead. Different strains of Shroomitis have different apotheosis stages, but all leave the infected host permanently changed. Most strains either dissolve the individual into a part of an evergrowing, cancerous and usually sentient rhizome. Other strains transform the victim into what is essentially a cordyceps-like fungal zombie lurching about, hungry for the sustenance and mulch that sentient lifeforms provide. This often ends with the host suicidally assaulting mighty entities like purple worms or dragons in the hopes of infecting them. Finally, it is rumored that funglet spore-cerers are working on a new strain of Shroomitis that allows fleshy life-forms to become funglets instead of dying. (This is a great way to explain why the new funglet character knows everything the previous character did.) As noted before, no two cases of Shroomitis are the same. As a result, whether magic works, and what salves can help cure the affliction will be determined on a case by case basis by the GM.

Colloid Melancholia

Colloid Melancholia is an affliction that befalls those who travel the colloid’s gorgeous landscapes for too long. Those who grieve or are of an excessively gloomy disposition (such as, ironically, dour destroyers) are particularly susceptible to Colloid Melancholia. Usually, travelers can cross the colloid for 2 days unimpeded, plus a number of days equal to their proficiency bonus + their Wisdom modifier. After that, one saving throw after each long rest is suggested. The character must succeed on a DC 15 + the colloid awareness score (see below) Wisdom saving throw, contracting Colloid Melancholia on a failure. Very few things can hasten the onset of Colloid Melancholia, but the colloid works in mysterious ways, and some hazards have been known to speed up the onset.

Long-term exposure to the colloid is measured in six levels. While afflicted with Colloid Melancholia, all effects that would increase exhaustion levels instead increase your Colloid Melancholia. Previously incurred exhaustion can be converted into Colloid Melancholia, subject to the GM’s discretion (Note: immunity to Colloid Melancholia prevents this conversion).

Colliatur are immune to Colloid Melancholia. A creature suffers from its current level of Colloid Melancholia as well as all lower levels. After infection, which is resisted with Wisdom, Colloid Melancholia is resisted with a Charisma saving throw, as it subverts the personality of the afflicted. For DCs, use exhaustion as guidelines.

Colloid Melancholia is a pernicious affliction: it takes a whole week’s worth of long rests to recover from it; only after having abstained from seeing the colloid for a whole week do Colloid Melancholia levels begin to vanish. On the 7th day of abstinence, 1 level is removed after finishing a long rest. Even brief exposure to the colloid’s beautiful form resets this duration.

Table 15-7: Colloid Melancholia
Level Effect
1 Mercy. You suddenly value life. You gain the colliatur’s Sacred Life racial feature.
2 Numbed. Your mind drifts towards paths you did not take and people you lost along the way. You have a -2 penalty on Wisdom and Charisma checks.
3 Wandering Mind. You have a hard time focusing on the present, as you see ghosts of your past everywhere. Tasks that take longer than one action take you twice as long to perform. Spellcasters must succeed a DC 10 Constitution check to cast spells.
4 Weakened. You can hardly be bothered to lift your feet—your will to exist in this world of pain is weakened greatly. Your Speed is halved and you have disadvantage on all attack rolls and damage rolls. Spellcasters now have disadvantage on their DC 10 Constitution check to cast spells.
5 Despondent. You sob and cry at the pain of existence and beam blissfully when witnessing the phantoms and joy hinted at by the colloid. The DC to cast spells increases to 20. You suffer from disadvantage on all attack rolls and saving throws. You will barter and beg to walk into the colloid and be left alone.
6 Lured. You lose all detrimental effects of Colloid Melancholia, but are plagued by only one thought: become part of the colloid. You will do absolutely everything you can to walk into the colloid. Unless extreme measures are taken (subject to GM’s discretion), you are effectively first an NPC, and then decisively dead. Those consumed by the colloid may not be returned to life, save as colliatur—and nobody knows if the colliatur returning are truly the beings that went into the colloid.

Colloid Awareness

Usually the colloid behaves as a static backdrop. However, if the characters travel through it accompanied by undead, or when they directly act against its interests, it may become aware of them and turn hostile. You can track the colloid’s awareness of the party with a simple mechanic. For each day the characters travel through colloid terrain, roll 1d20 and add the colloid awareness modifier, which begins at +0. Increases of the colloid awareness multiplier are cumulative. The default DC is 20, but you may modify that according to your needs. The deeds of the adventurers while in the colloid influence the colloid’s awareness.

If the colloid becomes aware, it may hamper the party, should it determine that they are a threat. The following should be taken as guidelines for further effects and may be used as lair or legendary actions by allies of the colloid.

  • Melancholia Burst. The colloid forces one creature to make a saving throw against Colloid Melancholia.
  • Fortification. The colloid grants one of its agents advantage on all saving throws until the end of the creature’s next turn.
  • Teleport The colloid absorbs one creature and instantly reassembles it, as per teleport.
  • Hard Light Phantom. The colloid can use its crystalline surface to create tangible, very real bodies of creatures. The colloid can duplicate pretty much any creature that has, at some point, been absorbed by it. (Which is pretty much any non-undead creature the GM can fathom, regardless of native biome.) These phantoms are immune to being blinded, deafened, charmed, exhausted, frightened or poisoned. They are immune to radiant and poison damage, but suffer from vulnerability to necrotic damage. Destroyed phantoms immediately discorporate into harmless fragments of light. GMs, this is carte blanch to introduce all manner of weird creatures!
Table 15-8: Colloid Awareness
PC Actions Colloid Awareness Modifier
Kill a sentient, intelligent being +1
Spare a defeated enemy -1
Travel with an undead +1 per undead, up to a maximum of +5
Travel with a dour destroyer/agent of the Grand Void1 +1
Cast a necromancy spell using a 7th level or higher spell slot +1
Kill a colliatur +1
Accompanied by an allied colliatur -1 per colliatur, up to a maximum of -3
Create/animate an undead +3
Excessive destruction of colloid terrain +1 to +10, depending on the level of destruction caused
Trying to extract someone suffering colloid melancholia + condition severity level of colloid melancholia suffered

1 The Darkness is beyond the limits of horror and imagination of all but the most disturbed individuals. Instead, in the way most cultures attempt to explain the unimaginable in terms they comprehend, many humanoids talk of the Grand Void—an endless, sunless, dark gray desert where the sand meets the sky at an undelineated horizon and the evidence of eons of entropy breaks the depressive monotony in the form of colossal ruins.

Call of the Lightless Abyss

There is something peculiar and frightening about picturing the lightless Endless Black, set far below even the realms of drow and dvergr; a place more hostile than any desert—cramped tunnels, vast fault lines, and the silent, patient, ceaseless Darkness. Staying too long in this region can affect even the most stalwart of beings, changing them in uncanny ways—the descent mirroring at once a retreat into the unconscious and a constant sense of debilitating trepidation in the face of magical devolution.

Table 15-9 is designed to represent a variety of effects and things that can happen to those that venture into the deep frontier. As this table directly influences the psyche and body of the affected, we have elected to keep it as rules-light as possible. It is the authors’ hope that this will retain its usefulness for years to come and allow you to use it in a variety of ways. For example, providing a bite attack for sharpened teeth may make sense to some groups, less so for others. Some groups may want to enforce madness with the rules systems provided by the game, while others may want to focus on roleplaying such changes.

Similarly, there are no hard rules to get rid of these changes—some groups may prefer having them be permanent and irrevocable, while others may want them to recede after staying away from the Darkness for prolonged periods of time. Other groups may favor having healing magic or spells that can break curses get rid of these effects. A number of the entries are deliberately vague and do not specify whether they are a delusion, a true change, or both—we leave such decisions in your capable hands. If an entry is rolled multiple times, the effects are cumulative, if that makes sense. If not, reroll.

Table 15-9: Call of the Lightless Abyss
d% Effect
1 Rockskin. Your skin takes on the hue and texture of rock in the area, but not its hardness. Your fine motor skills may be impeded, but you can consume one specific type of rock as a substitute for water.
2 Cosmic Perspective. With an air of fatalism, you accept your insignificance, becoming inured to your own suffering and that of others.
3 Odd Echolocation. You can open your mouth and emit click-clacking sounds, believing that your teeth vibrate and help you find creatures. Subject to the GM’s discretion, you might gain the Vestraadi’s sonar.
4 Haunted. You believe that you are followed by the sable ghost of a slain Underworld being. As time goes by it talks with you, and its advice sounds pertinent in comparison to that of your allies.
5 Ear to the Rock. You can predict cave-ins. 1 in 20 of the predictions are incorrect with regards to when they occur by 1d10 hours, or where they occur by 1d10 miles.
6 Song of the Deeps. You can hear the lullaby of the deep frontier. When you close your eyes and hum along, you may glean knowledge from the rumbling strata.
7 Hypersensitive Ears. You become exceedingly sensitive to even the slightest sound. Regular conversation hurts your ears, while other noises cause greater distress and even debilitation.
8 Hatred. You develop a hatred for one of the subterranean civilizations that have tainted the purity of the Darkness. Your shadow, if ever seen, is that of the civilization’s greatest foe.
9 Photophobia. Light means danger. Light means death. Light is the most hated enemy of all spelunkers who understand that the Underworld is the one true home for delvers; this view brooks no dissent.
10 Truth in Flesh. You feel compelled to carve important information into your skin. You may record spells onto your body, if a spellcaster. Next time you roll on this table, you may instead choose to automatically gain effect 23, “Read by Eating.”
11 Terrible Word. A dark and horrid series of syllables consumes your thoughts. You must, once per day, scream it at the top of your lungs…or things will happen. The syllables might be contagious.
12 Lengthened Body Hair. Your body hair grows at thrice the rate, to thrice the usual maximum length.
13 Insect Diet. The only proteins you can process are sourced from insects.
14 Eyeless. Your eyes seal up. You “see” with your sense of smell and keen hearing instead, gaining blindsight in a 30-foot radius. If you roll this result an additional time, increase the radius by 30 feet.
15 No Waste. You develop a compulsion to use EVERY part of a slain creature.
16 Obsessive Hunter. You must hunt whenever given the chance. You give no quarter.
17 Horns. Sharp and twisted horns protrude from your forehead. If you roll this a second time, they become long enough to act as a weapon for gore attacks, dealing 1d6 piercing damage. You are proficient with your horns.
18 Hear their Hearts. You can hear the heartbeats of living beings within a certain radius, usually 15 feet. Being surrounded by too many of them is maddening.
19 Perfect Olfactory Memory. You never forget a smell. Never.
20 Reptilian. You can taste blood in the air. By taking one minute and tasting the air, you can discern if there has been bloodshed within 100 feet of you, and potentially follow the taste of wounded targets.
21 Bone Sucker. You believe that sucking the marrow from bones will make you stronger. You feel weaker when deprived of bone marrow for a prolonged period of time.
22 Twitchy Eyes. Your eyes twitch like those of a madman, allowing you to quickly discern details, but making it hard to focus on the big picture of complex situations. Your passive Perception no longer discerns what it usually does, instead noticing things that would require an Intelligence (Investigation) check.
23 Read by Eating. If you eat a text that is written in any language you can speak, you immediately understand its content. Next time you roll on this table, you may instead choose to automatically gain effect 10, “Truth in Flesh.”
24 Language of Dark. You believe you can communicate with the Darkness and/or the deep frontier.
25 Tumorous Growths. You heal twice as quickly when resting, but also grow disfiguring tumors instead of regular scar tissue.
26 Claws. Your fingernails grow into grotesque, splintered, but functional claws. These claws deal 1d4 piercing or slashing damage (chosen when this result is rolled), and you are proficient with them.
27 Quadruped. You can move on all fours, courtesy of your unnaturally long and thin appendages. Your Speed increases by +10 feet while moving on all fours.
28 Osteo-Obsession. Collect one bone from everything you kill.
29 Tapeworm Friend. You have a tapeworm like no other. You must consume twice as much food. Your worm sometimes shows its face through your mouth or emerges from your bellybutton. You believe it is sentient and knows occult secrets.
30 Extreme Stoicism. It becomes all but impossible to affect you with any type of emotion, be it positive or negative. You have advantage on all saving throws against effects that try to instill these emotions in you.
31 Wild Mood Swings. You oscillate between being horribly depressed and manic.
32 Blood of the Earth. Your blood becomes a valued source of nutrients. One pint of your blood can nourish the water and food requirements of any creature, yourself included, as though they were 2 units of stock. Each pint thus consumed reduces your Hit Dice by 1 until you had a week to regain your strength in a civilized environment.
33 Mysterious Petroglyphs. Parts of your skin begin to peel off, revealing strange petroglyphs that seem to have been carved from the inside.
34 Call of Metals. You can hear one type of precious metal singing from behind the rocks. This may help you find seams of ore, subject to the GM’s approval.
35 Pale Eyes. Your irises and pupils vanish, leaving only a stark white cornea. You can see better in the dark.
36 Nyctophobia. The Darkness itself is hunting you. You try to avoid being submerged in it at any cost.
37 Feral Hunger. Whenever something falls unconscious or dies near you, you must succeed on a saving throw (GM’s choice) to refrain from attempting to gorge yourself on its raw flesh.
38 Blood-Drinker. You refuse to drink water—only blood will do.
39 Mute. You lose your voice. If you are a spellcaster, you can emit guttural groans to cast spells with verbal components.
40 Savage Meals. You become incapable of processing cooked food.
41 Dreams. Your dreams are haunted by strange and wondrous things, making you perpetually tired and longing to return to the light. Your dreams may provide prophetic visions.
42 Vermin-Whisperer. You believe you can talk to vermin. You may be right—but do they understand?
43 Ringmouth. Over several days your mouth transforms painfully into a circular, lamprey-like orifice including flexible muscle ridges that allow your three rows of teeth to rotate.
44 Collapsed Immune System. You experience an immune system dysfunction and have disadvantage on any saving throws against diseases you have to make. If you roll this result a second time, you automatically are subjected to every disease you encounter.
45 Climbing Claws. Your fingers bend into crooked claws that help climbing. You gain a climbing speed equal to 1/2 of your regular speed. Your fingers can’t stretch anymore.
46 Eroded Sense of Time. You can’t discern the difference between 1 and up to 72 hours.
47 Predator Delusion. You compulsively file your teeth.
48 Darkness Inside. When you open your mouth, magical darkness seeps out once per day. You have no control over when this happens.
49 Praise the Flame. You worship fire as a deity. Extinguishing one is blasphemy, seeing one go out is a tragedy.
50 Odorless Blood. Your blood turns into a transparent soup, making you look perpetually unhealthy and pale. You blood has no scent or flavor and you can’t be tracked by smelling or tasting your blood.
51 Riddle-Obsession. You must compulsively answer any riddle posed and concede to doing as asked if someone answers a riddle you pose.
52 Hoarder of Secrets. You compulsively hoard secrets and must succeed on a saving throw to share one.
53 Friendly Ropes. You believe that ropes are sentient. You must name every single one you encounter; if you do this and the rope is within 30 feet, you can command it to knot, unknot, or help you. They might betray you.
54 Eternal Hunger. You are perpetually hungry, but nothing even remotely satiates you.
55 Shifted Spectrum. Your vision spectrum drops to a shade of red. You gain Infravision, but lose the ability to discern blue or components of colors containing blue. Purple, for example, looks red to you.
56 Lost Species. You no longer are capable of behaving as your race. You lose one of the abilities your species usually has.
57 Waste No Allies. You are compelled to eat the fallen of your party.
58 Olfactory Identity. Visual identity ceases to have meaning for you—only the smell of other creatures allows you to identify them as specific individuals.
59 Tactile Identity. Visual identity ceases to have meaning for you—only touching them all over allows you to identify other creatures as specific individuals.
60 Traitorous Paper. You distrust paper and anything on, in or made of paper. Maps and map-makers are especially untrustworthy.
61 Bone Ridges. You develop ridges of bone on some part of your part of your body. If you roll this a second time, they become pronounced enough on your head or shoulders to act as a weapon for ram attacks, dealing 1d6 bludgeoning damage. You are proficient with your bone ridges.
62 Loss of the Sun. You lose any memory of the sun.
63 Pigmentation Shift. Your skin pigmentation grows lighter—if your skin is already white, you first become albino white, then translucent.
64 Unearthly Colors. You start seeing the colors dolm and jale.
65 Weight Obsession. You must constantly find ways to lighten your load, potentially throwing items away.
66 Paranoia. You become convinced that somebody is hiding something from you. Unless you get a fellow party member or ally to admit to a secret, you cannot advance a level.
67 Shapeless World. You can’t recall the name of anything you look at unless you make a miniature version of it out of mud or clay.
68 Body Magnetism. You can feel magnetic fields. Metal is evil.
69 Love the Flame. You become enamored with one type of thing that burns such as torches, camp fires, or candles. When your beloved item is extinguished, it’s as if they’ve been murdered; when it burns away completely, you feel abandoned.
70 Fused Legs. Your legs fuse together into a slug-like lump of flesh. You can only move by wriggling.
71 Hollow Needle Tongue. Your tongue elongates to a length of 5 feet, lolling from your mouth. It ends in a sharpened bone-ridge that has a compartment that can be filled with liquids, such as poisons without the risk of poisoning yourself.
72 Evil Mirrors. Reflections are potentially hardlight phantom spies, sent by the Colloid. Never discuss important matters in their presence.
73 True Narcissism. You believe that your reflection is a distinct entity and treat it as such.
74 Abnormal Body Temperature. Your body temperature cools to that of your surroundings when you are not exerting yourself. You may never warm others and feel cold to the touch.
75 Acidic Sweat. Your sweat becomes mildly acidic and irritating. Roll this again, and it deals 2 (1d4) acid damage per full round of contact.
76 Vector. You have become the vector for a strange virus or fungus. It wants you to help it spread.
77 Twilight’s Foe. Twilight is pure evil. You cannot sleep in dim light; either bright light or total darkness is needed.
78 Conserve the Self. You become obsessed about retaining the integrity of one of your body parts, such as your face, an arm, your torso, etc. You attempt to create an item that looks like it and wear it at every opportunity.
79 Consume Sounds. You can draw sustenance from sounds. Those that utter them forget the words that you eat. A dozen words are a unit of stock for you.
80 Fungal Symbiosis. A strange fungus rots your nose from within, but also protects you against a variety of inhaled toxins. Eventually a large gnarled toadstool replaces you nose.
81 Horrible Twitch. You may enter a state wherein you twitch unnaturally like a grotesque otherworldly beast. While moving, it makes it almost impossible to target you with ranged attacks. But you forget one important memory every time you use this power. Afterward, you know you have forgotten something vital, but may never thereafter retain that information no matter how many times you are retold it.
82 The Enemy’s Name. You lose any identification with your own name. You instead believe your name to be that of a horrible monster/villain.
83 Stained. You are perpetually stained, and the stains never come off. If rolled again, the stains are your blood. If again, the blood is from those you have killed. A fourth time and it is the blood of an innocent victim.
84 Second Pupils. You gain unearthly, second pupils in your eyes. What they see is up to the GM.
85 Visions of Eternity. Your pupils are shaped like hourglasses. You see everything age and decay when looking at them. Blinking resets the vision.
86 Hostile Color. Choose a color not usually found in the dark, such as blue or yellow. This color is the enemy and identifies their agents—you should do something about them…
87 Silent Breath. Your breathing no longer makes any sound whatsoever.
88 Be Still my Beating Heart. You no longer have a heartbeat. Strangely, this does not seem to impede you in any way.
89 Quills. You grow strange, porcupine-like quills from one part of your body. If you roll this a second time, they become long enough to act as a source of Barbed Hide (as barbed devil) attacks, dealing 1d6 piercing damage to any creature that grapples you.
90 Slug-Slime. Your sweat becomes sticky, disgusting mucus. Enemies with a Keen Sense of Smell have advantage on tracking you by smell, and you cannot conceal your smell. Unless you have washed in the last 2 hours, you are automatically noticed by creatures with a Keen Sense of Smell within 60 ft. of you.
91 Geometric Obsession. Choose a geometric shape not usually encountered in the Lightless Abyss, such as a perfect square or a spiral. You see the shape everywhere, becoming convinced that it holds a cosmic secret.
92 Hello Darkness, My Old Friend. You give names to different levels of Darkness and talk to them.
93 Translucent Lids. Your eyelids become translucent. You can’t sleep in bright light.
94 Ascension. You believe you need to become an angel to escape the dark that stained you. You attempt to assemble an angel from the body parts of your fallen foes and whatever you can scavenge. If you ever finish the angel-body, you might consider killing yourself to inhabit the “superior” body.
95 Pseudo-Phylactery. You believe that your soul is housed in one of your items, and that your body will regrow if you are slain, provided your “phylactery” is nearby. The trouble is, you don’t know which of your items holds your soul.
96 Stake ‘Em. You need to stake any unconscious creature you encounter. They are vampires. Other party members are exempt, so long as they can convince you every now and then that they are not vampires.
97 Summon Corruption. Creatures you summon, or those that are summoned, within 200 feet of you are replaced with THINGS. These may or may not be under the control of their respective summoner.
98 Forever Thirsty. Your thirst can never be slaked. Your voice turns to a dry rasping. If you roll this a second time, you stop sweating.
99 Perfect Digestion. You digest everything. You no longer produce feces.
00 Sedate Me. You develop an addiction to one substance. You need that substance to function.
Section 15: Copyright Notice
Survivalist's Guide to Spelunking. © 2021, AAW Games; Thilo Graf, Doug Niles, Stephen Yeardley. Underworld Races and Classes © 2017 AAW Games LLC; Designers: Thilo Graf and Mike Myler