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Perils

Perils are like natural traps, only they often appear spontaneously and are an inherent challenge in the wilderness. In this appendix, you will discover how to use this new game mechanic to help make long trips more challenging.

Using and Adapting Perils

Perils can be spotted, circumvented, or even destroyed. Sometimes, one can simply wait a peril out, such as a violent storm or landslide. The leader can adapt a peril’s challenge to their group and the needs of their campaign. Perils can also be used as story-writing tools, either by giving them a particular meaning or by using them to take the story in a particular direction. For example, an exceptional blizzard could suggest that something serious is happening, or a collapse could uncover ancient ruins unexplored for centuries.

While ordinary individuals might be caught at the worst possible moment and perish from a natural peril, your adventurers are Fate-chosen. As such, an untimely, unglamorous death is unsuited for them.

If you use this option, fate never challenges the adventurers with inescapable perils, nor will it leave them helpless. No matter the situation, there is always a way out or some stroke of luck that allows them to survive.

In the case of an avalanche, for instance, adventurers are never buried so deep that they can’t dig themselves out. Faced with a pyroclastic flow, they will always find shelter in which to take refuge. No volcanic eruption or tsunami will ever make them anonymous victims, swept away by these events.

Challenge Rating and Saving Throws

Like a creature, a peril has a CR measuring how dangerous it is and the appropriate party level for it. Among other things, the CR determines a peril’s proficiency bonus, which will be used to calculate the saving throw associated with that peril. A peril’s harmfulness comes into effect through hostile phenomena that the players will have to resist by making a saving throw with DC equal to 8 + the peril’s proficiency bonus + the peril’s dangerousness.

Dangerousness of the Peril

Perils have varying degrees of dangerousness. A peril can be benign (-1), common (+0), challenging (+1), harsh (+2), hazardous (+3), very hazardous (+4), or extreme (+5). These modifiers are added to the proficiency bonus to determine the peril’s DC or attack roll.

The Three Aspects of a Peril’s Dangerousness

A peril has three different aspects. Anticipation allows one to detect warning signs, to understand them, and to know how to react effectively.

It is based on knowledge of nature and terrain, and therefore generally requires Wisdom (Survival) or Intelligence (Nature) checks. PCs will thus be able to see a storm approaching, notice a heaviness in the air, discern signs of toxicity, etc. Some perils may call upon other skills, either to spot them or to deal with them.

Manifestation is the danger posed by the peril’s pure destruction and other undesirable effects. At this point, if the adventurers haven’t been able to avoid the peril, all they can do is try to survive. This is where saving throws come in.

The duration of a peril is the time during which a peril remains active.

Teamwork

If you use this option, an adventurer is chosen as a guide by the party. They alone make the anticipation checks, possibly with the help of another party member if deemed appropriate (typically if the assistant is proficient in the relevant skill), in which case the guide has advantage on anticipation checks. Thus, this role is of particular importance, and adventurers would be wise to have an experienced person to rely on.

Helpful Imperilment

You can use this option if you want to allow adventurers to help one another in the event of a peril.

Each party member can individually choose to put themselves in peril. This choice must be made upon the peril’s manifestation, before any ability checks or saving throws are made. An adventurer who puts themselves in peril has disadvantage on the related ability check or saving throw; in exchange, a creature of their choice gains advantage on the same roll.

As the party travels across pack ice, they are exposed to the thin ice peril. All party members must make a DC 14 Dexterity saving throw or fall through the ice! Acting on sheer courage, one of the adventurers chooses to leap and push one of his companions out of the dangerous area, thus putting himself in even more danger. The adventurer therefore has disadvantage on his Dexterity saving throw while his companion has advantage.

Simple and Complex Perils

Just like traps, perils can be simple or complex.

A simple peril is a one-time, immediate occurrence.

A complex peril works in much the same way, except that its effect repeats itself until the end of the phenomenon. This translates into a new aspect, repetition, which can occur once per round, per minute, per hour, etc.

The table below summarizes the possible CR and associated proficiency bonus and damage of a peril.

Peril Challenge Ratings
CR Proficiency Bonus Damage
0 +2 1
1/8 +2 2 (1d4)
1/4 +2 3 (1d6)
1/2 +2 4 (1d8)
1 +2 5 (1d10)
2 +2 11 (2d10)
3 +2 13 (2d12)
4 +2 16 (3d10)
5 +3 22 (4d10)
6 +3 27 (5d10)
7 +3 33 (6d10)
8 +3 38 (7d10)
9 +4 44 (8d10)
10 +4 49 (9d10)
11 +4 55 (10d10)
12 +4 60 (11d10)
13 +5 66 (12d10)
14 +5 71 (13d10)
15 +5 77 (14d10)
16 +5 88 (16d10)
17 +6 99 (18d10)
18 +6 110 (20d10)
19 +6 121 (22d10)
20 +6 132 (24d10)

Volcanic Gas

Hazardous peril, complex CR 3

Great sulfur concentrations in volcanic areas make the air difficult to breathe. Under normal circumstances, this merely leads to a temporary feeling of discomfort and shortness of breath, which is only dangerous in the event of prolonged exposure. However, in some areas (especially near cracks and crevices), sulfur is present in such large quantities that it makes the air toxic, exposing a hapless party to suffocation. Worse still, in a place so full of volatile gases, even the slightest flame can have disastrous results.

Anticipation. A successful DC 13 Intelligence (Nature) or Wisdom (Survival) check reveals the presence of a pocket of volcanic gas from a distance. A wise traveler will then take care to circumvent the area.

Manifestation. A creature in an area of volcanic gas can only hold its breath for a number of minutes equal to 1 + its Constitution modifier (minimum of 30 seconds) before suffocating. In addition, at the time of exposure, the creature must succeed on a DC 13 Constitution saving throw or take a level of exhaustion. Finally, the presence of a flame in the vicinity of the volcanic gas creates an explosion dealing 14 (4d6) fire damage in the whole area.

Repetition. Strictly speaking, this peril has no repeating effect, but the suffocating effect persists while in the area.

Duration. Permanent unless the gas is removed.

Ash Storm

Challenging peril, complex CR 3

Ash storms engulf vast areas in a cloud that greatly reduces visibility and can even blind travelers. Dust carried by high winds is abrasive and can even become dangerous when inhaled for too long.

Anticipation. A successful DC 11 Intelligence (Nature) or Wisdom (Survival) check anticipates an ash storm 1 hour in advance. Then, the safest option is finding an airtight shelter, whether a natural formation (such as a cave) or a tent adapted to this kind of weather.

Manifestation. Ash density makes the area lightly obscured in a 20 ft. radius around a creature and heavily obscured beyond that radius. In addition, any creature that breathes the air in the area must succeed on a DC 11 Constitution saving throw or lose 2 (1d4) hit points. If the save is failed by 5 or more, the creature is also poisoned until it finishes a short or long rest.

Repetition. Every minute.

Duration. An ash storm lasts 1d12 hours.

Thin Crust

Hazardous Peril, simple CR 4

The mountainous terrain of volcanic regions can give a deceptive impression of solidity.

Unwary travelers may easily forget that some areas consist only of a thin layer of minerals, which will collapse under the weight of a humanoid. If the individual is lucky, they will only suffer a harmless messy fall. However, the thin crust may also be located above a pool of lava or acid, sending the unfortunate individual right into a much more dreadful peril.

Anticipation. A successful DC 13 Intelligence (Investigation) or Wisdom (Survival) check reveals the fragility of the crust.

Manifestation. In the event of thin-crust collapse, a successful DC 13 Dexterity saving throw allows the creature to safely move away from the collapse zone. On a failure, the creature falls. The leader can determine what lies beneath the crust or leave it to chance.

Terrain Hidden Under Thin Crust
d12 Hidden Terrain Damage
1 to 6 Pit 1d4 × 10 ft. deep 1d6 bludgeoning damage for every 10 ft. fallen
7 to 10 Pool of burning acid 4 (1d8) acid damage and 2 (1d4) fire damage per round
11 to 12 Lava lake 71 (13d10) fire damage per round

Acid Lake

Common peril, complex CR 5

In volcanic areas, stagnant bodies of water can become laden with sulfurous gas. Over time, they can reach temperatures and acidity levels that are lethal to ordinary living beings. These acidic pools can reach lake-size proportions and are recognizable by their blue-green color, which is very different from ordinary water. They are hazardous to most forms of life, boiling and gnawing away at anyone unfortunate enough to fall in.

Anticipation. This peril and its danger are easily recognizable with a successful DC 11 Intelligence (Nature) or Wisdom (Survival) check. Only careless travelers would deliberately approach it.

Manifestation. Immersion in an acid lake deals 4 (1d8) acid damage and 2 (1d4) fire damage.

Repetition. Every round.

Duration. Until the creature leaves the area.

Lava Flow

Hazardous peril, complex CR 14

Lava is an amalgamation of molten rock. It can easily reach temperatures as high as 2,000°F, leaving no chance of survival for anyone exposed to it, except the most extraordinarily resistant creatures, or those immune to fire.

Lava is often pictured in the form of static molten lakes, but this volcanic peril can also be a moving danger. Lava flows can pour down for tens of miles around a volcano and can reach speeds of up to 30 miles per hour. They can catch adventurers off guard and kill an entire party if they are excessively unwary or unlucky.

Anticipation. A successful DC 16 Intelligence (Nature) or Wisdom (Survival) check anticipates the lava flow 2d4 minutes in advance. On a failure, the traveler only has 2d4 rounds of advance warning, and if the check is failed by 5 or more, they will be surprised by the lava flow, spotting it only when it is almost upon them. If the party is threatened by a lava flow, the leader may allow a DC 16 Wisdom (Survival) check to find a safe place to take shelter. Said shelter can be as simple as an outcropping around which the lava will flow.

Manifestation. Creatures exposed to a lava flow must succeed on a DC 16 Dexterity saving throw or take 71 (13d10) fire damage, or half as much damage on a success.

Repetition. Every round.

Duration. Until the creature leaves the area. Lava flows can occur at any time in an active volcano, and the lava can take years to cool down, forming impressive fiery rivers.

Pyroclastic Flow

Extreme peril, simple CR 18

Some volcanoes don’t just spew out lava or rocks: their eruptions take the form of terrifying pyroclastic flows of unimaginable violence. They tumble down slopes at speeds up to 100 miles per hour, carrying huge amounts of destructive debris while temperatures reach up to 1,000°F. Even worse, the cloud is so large that it can engulf entire small towns.

Anticipation. A successful DC 19 Intelligence (Nature) or Wisdom (Survival) check anticipates the pyroclastic flow 2d12 minutes in advance. On a failure, the traveler only has 2d12 rounds of advance warning, and if the check is failed by 5 or more, they will be surprised by the pyroclastic flow, spotting it only when it is almost on them. If the party is threatened by a pyroclastic flow, the leader may allow a DC 19 Wisdom (Survival) check to find a safe place where they can take shelter. Only very strong stone structures can offer protection against such devastation.

Manifestation. Exposed creatures must succeed on a DC 19 Dexterity saving throw or take 49 (9d10) fire damage, and on a DC 19 Constitution saving throw or take an additional 65 (10d12) bludgeoning damage, or half as much on a success in both cases. Additionally, the area is heavily obscured because of the flow’s burning ashes.

Duration. The pyroclastic flow descends the slope and submerges everything in its path, then dissipates.

The phenomenon rarely lasts longer than 1 minute.

Mountain Perils

Presenting difficult, untamed terrain, mountains include a variety of perils that complicate expeditions and forbid the use of heavy vehicles. Even seasoned adventurers will be at best slowed down by such an environment, and will have to remain vigilant lest they rush into a potentially deadly natural trap.

Indeed, given their high altitude, falling down from a mountain is an accident few can survive.

Treacherous Terrain

Harsh peril, simple CR 1

Mountains are dotted with uneven and unstable terrain, and so travelers must be particularly wary or risk a fall. At best, sprains, strains, or soreness from a sudden fall are inconveniences that simply slow a traveler down—even causing laughter or embarrassment in most benign cases—but, at worst, they can spell the doom of a vulnerable or weakened individual.

Anticipation. With a successful daily DC 12 Wisdom (Survival) check, a traveler will take all appropriate precautions: walk on the safest paths, spot natural obstacles, adjust their companions’ equipment to guarantee better stability, etc. These effective methods grant the party advantage on the Dexterity (Acrobatics or Athletics) check below. A climber’s kit can also be a boon.

Manifestation. Overcoming the peril of treacherous terrain requires a successful DC 12 Dexterity (Acrobatics or Athletics) check. Typically, this check need only be performed once or twice a day. However. the leader may repeat it if the terrain is particularly rough or the context particularly perilous (weather conditions are bad, the party is in a hurry, etc.). On a failed check, the creature falls. Fall damage depends on the circumstances but can default to 7 (2d6) bludgeoning damage. If the check is failed by 5 or more, the creature falls in such a way that its mobility is affected (dislocated ankle, sprained leg, damaged knee, etc.), reducing its speed by 10 ft. until it completes a short or long rest.

Altitude Sickness

Harsh peril, simple CR 3

Altitude sickness is the result of a number of complications due to oxygen deprivation at high altitudes. After a steep and rapid ascent, starting from 6,500 feet, some people may experience problems such as extreme fatigue, headaches, and disorientation. The sickness can also take more serious forms. It can considerably weaken a traveler and thus impede the party’s progress.

The simple peril described here applies to an altitude of 6,500 feet, but it also occurs at higher altitudes, with a proportionate DC increase. For each additional 2,000 feet climbed, the DC increases by 1 (13 for 8,500 ft., 14 for 10,500 ft., etc.).

Anticipation. If a traveler follows a route that would expose them to altitude sickness, a successful DC 12 Wisdom (Survival) check allows them to realize it. If creatures begin to show symptoms of altitude sickness, a successful DC 12 Wisdom (Medicine) check detects these warning signs before the sickness sets in. On a failure, a check that is failed by 5 or less still allows the traveler to notice and understand the sickness, though too late to remedy it.

In any case, stopping or slowing down the progress of the party can help to prevent altitude sickness or keep it from worsening.

Manifestation. A creature exposed to this peril must make a DC 12 Constitution saving throw.

On a failure, the creature takes a level of exhaustion. While suffering from this level of exhaustion, it can’t benefit from taking long rests at that altitude or higher, and it can only lose it by taking a long rest at a lower altitude. Once the creature has lost the level of exhaustion, if it encounters this peril at the same altitude, it has advantage on the saving throw.

Avalanche

Hazardous peril, simple CR 7

Avalanches are the most well-known peril in mountainous areas. An avalanche occurs when an unstable mass of rock, earth, rubble, and other miscellaneous material breaks off from a section of the mountain, picking up everything in its path. As with many other perils, the best travelers can do against an avalanche is often to avoid triggering it, and a party would be well advised to avoid noisy or unstable spells, especially those dealing thunder damage, lest they bring this peril upon themselves. Some particularly industrious and intrepid dwarven builders and rock gnomes deliberately cause avalanches by means of undermining activities or explosives, neutralizing the threat these perils pose by triggering them in controlled ways.

The avalanches described here apply to mountainous terrain, but the same rules can be used for a mudslide or snow avalanche.

Anticipation. A successful DC 14 Intelligence (Nature) or Wisdom (Survival) check allows a traveler to discern whether they are in an avalanche-prone area. In these circumstances, the leader may ask the party for a DC 10 Dexterity (Acrobatics or Stealth) group check in order not to trigger an avalanche. If the party is threatened by an avalanche, the leader may allow a DC 14 Wisdom (Survival) check to find a safe place where they can take shelter.

Manifestation. A creature exposed to an avalanche will be swept away by the rocky wave and tossed in all directions, with the risk of being buried under the mass. It must succeed on a DC 14 Dexterity saving throw or take 33 (6d10) bludgeoning damage and be buried. On a success, the creature takes half as much damage and is not buried. A buried creature must succeed on a DC 14 Strength (Athletics) check to free itself from the debris, or start suffocating.

Duration. An avalanche can last from less than a minute to about ten minutes in the case of particularly unstable terrain.

Cold Perils

Cold perils are natural hazards that result from exposure to cold. The leader can handle this hazard in two ways, depending on whether they wish to take a gritty or heroic approach. The default method is the style, which deals cold damage.

Snow Avalanche

Using this option adds special features to avalanches, making them formidable even for an experienced group. In this version, this alternative peril’s manifestation replaces that of the ordinary avalanche and applies only to snow-covered terrain. It is in part because of snow avalanches that dwarven guesthouses are set up close to the most dangerous passes. The locals train large dogs that are well adapted to the mountains so they can quickly find victims and provide assistance. A creature exposed to the snow avalanche must succeed on a DC 14 Dexterity saving throw or take 9 (2d8) bludgeoning damage and be buried under the avalanche (see below). On a success, it takes half as much damage and is not buried. A creature swallowed by the avalanche must succeed on a DC 14 Constitution saving throw.

Trapped in the snow, the creature has 15 minutes of air on a failed Constitution save, 90 minutes on a success. After this time, the creature starts suffocating.

A trapped creature is buried at a depth of 1d12 × feet. To extract itself, it can make one DC 14 Strength (Athletics) check every minute to dig through 1 foot of snow.

Rescuing a buried creature is difficult, as there are no visible clues on the surface to tell where it is under the loose snow. It is still possible to search for it with a DC 14 Intelligence (Investigation) or Wisdom (Survival) check, but this takes 10 minutes and is made with disadvantage. Creatures with the Keen Smell or Keen Hearing traits can automatically spot a life form in a 10-foot radius around them. Like the buried creature, rescuers can make a DC 14 Strength (Athletics) check every minute to dig through 1 foot of snow until the creature is free.

Cold Damage

On a failed Constitution saving throw against cold, the creature takes cold damage. If the save is failed by 5 or more, it also becomes numb.

If you use this option, very dangerous perils for low-level adventurers will become harmful but non-life-threatening annoyances for high-level heroes. On the other hand, many NPCs (such as commoners, which make up the bulk of the population) may succumb at the first saving throw.

This approach treats perils as an obstacle to be overcome, making them part of the succession of battles and heroic ordeals that the group will have to face.

Numbness

On the first failed Constitution save against cold, the creature becomes numb. If a creature fails a Constitution save against cold while already numb, it takes a level of exhaustion.

If you use this option, high-level adventurers will still fear the cold, as even they are never safe from an unlucky saving throw.

Minor Cold

Challenging peril, complex CR 1/2

Minor cold refers to the usual weather conditions of the dead of winter in the Septentrion.

It applies starting from 30°F.

Anticipation. Appropriate equipment and good survival habits (requiring a successful daily DC 11 Wisdom (Survival) check) grant advantage on the saving throw against this peril.

Manifestation. A creature must succeed on a DC 11 Constitution saving throw or take 4 (1d8) cold damage. If the save is failed by 5 or more, the creature is also numb. A creature must succeed on a DC 11 Constitution saving throw or become numb. If the save is failed by 5 or more, the creature also takes a level of exhaustion.

Repetition. Every 3 hours.

Duration. Permanent as long as the temperature remains below 30°F.

Northern Lights

Hazardous peril, complex CR 1/4

Northern lights sometimes appear, arousing fascination. The appearance of northern lights depends on the solar cycle, meaning they can be rare in some years and much more frequent in others. They are especially common in the polar circle. This sight is as enchanting as it is dangerous.

Anticipation. A successful DC 13 Intelligence (Nature) check anticipates the appearance of northern lights ten minutes in advance. For a group of travelers, it is recommended to make a stop to avoid being disoriented by the northern lights and taking the wrong route.

Manifestation. Creatures exposed to northern lights must succeed on a DC 13 Intelligence saving throw or become subject to sensory disturbances in the form of auditory illusions and difficulties in orienting themselves, resulting in disadvantage on Wisdom (Perception and Survival) checks. This disadvantage persists until they complete a short or long rest.

Repetition. Every 10 minutes.

Duration. Northern lights last for up to 30 minutes before fading away. They may reappear here or there a few hours later.

Crisis of the Long Night

Challenging peril, complex CR 1

Exposure to polar winter and its very long periods without sunshine is an ordeal that affects both morale and physique. The days start to shorten as soon as the summer solstice passes, but the night becomes longer than the day from the autumn equinox to the spring equinox. At the height of winter, night duration depends on latitude. Inhabitants face this adversity by holding many celebrations during winter: sports events, music competitions, banquets, etc. They take any opportunity for gatherings and entertainment, helping them make it through this dark season. However, the danger is much more serious in the wilderness, as the random occurrence of crises can have dramatic consequences.

Anticipation. The crisis of the long night affects people who are physically or morally isolated, such as hermits, adventurers tormented by guilt, a couple in the middle of a lover’s quarrel, etc. Rarely does it affect an entire group at once; rather, it occurs as a succession of small crises. Since the affliction is tied to loneliness and feelings of vulnerability, it can be warded off by actions that promote party unity (joint singing, games, etc.). A successful DC 11 Wisdom (Intuition) check helps recognize the first signs of agitation.

Manifestation. Creatures that have been isolated for a week must succeed on a DC 11 Wisdom saving throw or suffer from short-term madness, or long-term madness on a natural 1. After the save has been made, the onset of the crisis is left to the leader’s discretion, though it should preferably occur at a stressful time.

Repetition. Every week as long as isolation persists.

Duration. The duration of the peril depends on location and time of the season.

Icy Mists

Hazardous peril, complex CR 2

Occurring both on land and at sea, the icy mists of the Septentrion are well known. When they appear, they can completely immobilize entire groups. They are particularly dangerous when they appear along with creatures such as wails of the wastes, or near chasms.

Anticipation. A successful DC 13 Intelligence (Nature) or Wisdom (Survival) check anticipates the arrival of a patch of fog 1 hour in advance. This time can be reduced if the weather conditions are particularly conducive to a sudden appearance. The phenomenon first affects low altitude areas and the bottom of valleys. In particularly unfavorable circumstances, even an experienced explorer can only spot the phenomenon about 15 minutes in advance.

Manifestation. The mist is so dense that the area is heavily obscured. Furthermore, a creature that spends 10 minutes in an icy mist must succeed on a DC 13 Constitution saving throw or become numb.

Repetition. Every 10 minutes.

Duration. On average, a patch of icy mist persists for a 30 minutes over an area that spans a few hundred feet, but this may increase depending on local conditions and the possible intervention of tides of magic.

Thin Ice

Very hazardous peril, complex CR 4

Many people in the Septentrion use lakes, rivers, and ice floes as transportation routes, the flat surfaces being suitable for sleds or skis. Walking is also easier than in the woods, where one often encounters deep snows and obstacles. Unfortunately, the ice can be much thinner in some places than in others. This may be due to currents or a shallower depth, or because it’s still early winter and the cold has not yet set in. In the spring, when the ice begins to melt, this peril is also common.

Anticipation. Thin ice is treacherous, and even a seasoned traveler will have trouble spotting it. A successful DC 14 Intelligence (Investigation) or Wisdom (Survival) check reveals the fragility of the ice.

Manifestation. When the ice begins to crack, a successful DC 14 Dexterity saving throw allows the creature to safely move away from the cracks. On a failure, the creature falls into the water and becomes exposed to the following effects:

  • Drifting. Underwater, the creature must succeed on a DC 14 Wisdom (Athletics) check at the start of its turn to resurface where it fell. On a failure, the creature gets lost and hits the surface ice. It can attempt the same Wisdom (Athletics) check again each round to return to the surface, either where it fell in or elsewhere, but with disadvantage.
  • Drowning. As soon as it becomes submerged, the creature is at risk of suffocation.
  • Hypothermia. The creature suffers the effects of icy water (refer to this peril for its effects, repetition, and duration).

Dangerous Cold

Hazardous peril, complex CR 4

On some clear nights, or when the polar wind blows, the cold is so intense that it immediately becomes dangerous. Suitable clothes are essential for survival. Typically, these consist of thick furs made of reindeer hide or sealskin, with hoods and gloves. The usual equipment for adventurers in temperate zones is of little use in these conditions. This danger applies starting from a temperature of -20°F.

Anticipation. It is possible to anticipate the arrival of dangerous cold with a successful DC 14 Intelligence (Nature) or Wisdom (Survival) check. Appropriate equipment and good survival habits (requiring a successful daily DC 14 Wisdom (Survival) check) grant advantage on the saving throw against this peril.

Manifestation. A creature must succeed on a DC 14 Constitution saving throw or take 5 (1d10) cold damage. If the save is failed by 5 or more, the creature is also numb. A creature must succeed on a DC 14 Constitution saving throw or become numb. If the save against this peril fails while the creature is already numb, it also takes a level of exhaustion.

Repetition. Every hour.

Duration. Permanent as long as the temperature remains below -20°F.

Icy Water

Very hazardous peril, complex CR 5

Immersion in icy water is a well-known peril in cold regions. Numbness rapidly sets in, and death by hypothermia follows soon after.

Anticipation. An obvious prevention is simply to avoid falling into the water. In northern regions, when it is necessary to cross a stream, it is customary to undress, cross it quickly while keeping one’s equipment dry, and redress just as quickly.

Manifestation. In case of immersion in icy water, the creature must succeed on a DC 15 Constitution saving throw or become numb. If the save is failed by 5 or more, or if the creature was already numb, the creature also takes a level of exhaustion.

Repetition. Every 5 minutes in the water; every 15 minutes once the creature is out of the water but remains wet.

Duration. The peril persists as long as the creature is in the water or soaking wet. Any means that would end the numb condition also ends this peril.

Blizzard

Hazardous peril, complex CR 6

A blizzard is a well-known and feared meteorological phenomenon, so much so that no Septentrion inhabitant would dare venture outdoors in such conditions. Communities shut themselves away and wait for the storm to pass, and every traveler knows that they must find shelter as quickly as possible or risk certain death. Even creatures immune to the cold are reluctant to go out while a blizzard rages.

Anticipation. A successful DC 14 Intelligence (Nature) or Wisdom (Survival) check made the day before the phenomenon predicts its approximate appearance the next day. The same check can be made again a few hours before the blizzard.

Manifestation. An area caught in a blizzard is lightly obscured, or even heavily obscured in the case of a particularly violent blizzard. A creature caught in a blizzard must succeed on a DC 14 Constitution saving throw or take 5 (1d10) cold damage, plus 2 (1d4) bludgeoning damage, or half as much damage on a success. The blizzard peril is also accompanied by a cold peril of a level relevant to the weather (minor, dangerous, deadly, or planar).

Repetition. Every 30 minutes.

Duration. The duration of a blizzard varies greatly. It may last only a few hours, or it may last for days, but the average duration is half a day. The leader can roll 2d12 if they want to estimate this duration.

Deadly Cold

Very hazardous peril, complex CR 9

The deadly cold afflicts the most hostile areas of the Septentrion, and is sometimes said to be the breath of the Gemoniae crossing the icy planar portal of the far north. Only the hardiest and most well-equipped individuals can venture outdoors at such temperatures, and only for limited periods of time. Thus, it is advised to wrap oneself from head to toe in the warmest clothes, to eat well, and to avoid areas exposed to the wind. Creatures that survive in these conditions do so by virtue of their physical features and life-saving habits, or simply due to their cold immunity. This peril applies starting from a temperature of -75°F.

Anticipation. It is possible to anticipate the arrival of a deadly cold with a successful DC 16 Intelligence (Nature) or Wisdom (Survival) check. Appropriate equipment and good survival habits (requiring a successful daily DC 16 Wisdom (Survival) check) grant advantage on the saving throw against this peril.

Manifestation. A creature must succeed on a DC 16 Constitution saving throw or take 11 (2d10) cold damage. If the save is failed by 5 or more, the creature is also numb. In addition, all non-magic items exposed to the deadly cold acquire the fragile property.

This property is lost once exposure to the deadly cold is over. A creature must succeed on a DC 16 Constitution saving throw or become numb. If the save fails against this peril while the creature is already numb, it also takes one level of exhaustion.

Repetition. Every 30 minutes.

Duration. Permanent as long as the temperature remains below -75°F.

Extraplanar Cold

Extreme peril, complex CR 14

This nightmarish cold is so extreme that it only occurs in the immediate vicinity of an icy planar portal of the far north.

As the name suggests, this peril is permanent in Gemoniae, where only creatures immune to the cold can survive. Temperatures are so extreme that there is no known way to measure them.

Anticipation. Appropriate equipment and good survival habits (requiring a successful daily DC 18 Wisdom (Survival) check) grant advantage on the saving throw against this peril.

Manifestation. A creature must succeed on a DC 18 Constitution saving throw or take 16 (3d10) cold damage. If the save is failed by 5 or more, the creature is also numb. In addition, all non-magic items exposed to the planar cold acquire the fragile property. This property is lost once exposure to the cold is over. A creature must succeed on a DC 18 Constitution saving throw or become numb. If the save fails against this peril while the creature is already numb, it also takes one level of exhaustion.

Repetition. Every 15 minutes.

Duration. Permanent in some areas.

Section 15: Copyright Notice

The Creatures Rulebook for the Fateforge Role-Playing Game Copyright © 2021 Studio Agate.